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Is 2 Year Old Beer Drinkable?

Poll Results: Well, what do you say?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 45% (19)
    It's still drinkable.
  • 16% (7)
    Toss it.
  • 38% (16)
    You should drink it as punishment.
42 Total Votes  
post #1 of 76
Thread Starter 
So yes, this is a travesty and I probably don't deserve an answer to this question.

However, I have neglected half a case of Molson in my closet. I'd like to say "misplaced" or "forgotten" but honestly I just don't drink beer much in my apartment during the semester. I was elsewhere last summer, and the same pattern repeated itself this past year. But now I'm here and wondering how drinkable 2 year old beer is. I just bought a case of Sam Adams Summer Styles (Boston Lager, Light, Hefeweizen, Summer Ale, Cherry Wheat, Pale Ale) and a case of Coors Light (the 16 ounce plastic bottles... quality ) so my guess is that I can slip the old beer under people's alcohol-deadened taste buds after a while.

What do you think?
post #2 of 76
I once found a 5-year old case of beer. It wasn't bad. Of course, we drank it. Poor college students will drink anything, especially if it's free!
post #3 of 76
Thread Starter 
Nice!

I should add that the beer was in a case in a dark closet, so there you go just in case anyone has any questions about whether it was exposed to light.
post #4 of 76
Beer is a Perishable Product

Beer is a foodstuff. As with most foodstuffs, beer is perishable-it deteriorates as a result of the action of bacteria, light, and air. However, unlike other food products, packaged beer is not legally mandated to carry a "sell by" date. Nonetheless, some domestic beer sold in the United States does carry a freshness date. The Boston Beer Company was among the first to use freshness dating, as far back as 1985. Anheuser-Busch has followed suit with its much-publicized "born on" dates. There are still many breweries, large and small, which do not send all their beers to market with a freshness date, but the trend is certainly moving in the right direction.
Stabilization
Prior to bottling, a typical commercial ale or lager will undergo some form of stabilization to extend its shelf life. The two primary forms of stabilization are sterile filtration, in which the beer is passed through a microporous filter that will not let through any "crunchy bits" larger than 0.5 microns; and pasteurization, whereby the beer is heated briefly to kill any microbial wildlife. Both approaches are widely used, though a number of brewers have noted that sterile filtration strips some hop flavors from their ales. A third, traditional option for preparing a beer for its journey in a bottle to your glass, "bottle conditioning," is dealt with later.

Freshness period: The drinking window

The length of time it takes for a beer to become stale (a papery note, dulled hop character, or other off flavors) is determined by the alcoholic strength and hopping level of the beer. Both alcohol and hops help preserve beer. Thus hoppier, stronger beers keep for longer. Typically, the freshness period for a lager is four months; for stronger craft-brewed ales, five months. High-gravity, high-strength beers such as doppelbocks typically carry a six- to twelve-month freshness period. All of the preceding assumes proper handling of the beer.

How can you determine the "drinking window" of a beer? It depends on the dating system used by the brewery. Taking a typical example of Boston Beers Samuel Adams brands, the freshness period is the time between shipment from the brewery and the freshness date, or "consume by" date, marked on the label or capsule. In the case of a beer with a "born on" date (Anheuser-Busch products, for example), the freshness period is approximately four months after the date on the label.
Imports: A note of caution

Imported beer can have a rough ride on its way to your local retailer. First, it must undergo a sea voyage, hopefully in temperature-controlled containers, or "reefers," in industry parlance. After sitting in the bonded customs warehouse (hopefully, air conditioned), it must pass through an importers warehouse and then be shipped to a wholesalers warehouse. In the best case, the local wholesaler will have temperature-controlled storage and an efficient stock

control system, although this is an area of commerce that is not renowned for sympathetic handling of product or startling efficiency with stock. One thing is for sure-at any moment of time in the Byzantine system of beer distribution in the United States, a prodigious amount of imported beer is sitting in warehouses slowly undergoing the inexorable effects of aging.

This is not to suggest that many imported beers do not find their way to us in perfect condition. However, one is not reassured by the reluctance of virtually all beer importers to put freshness dating on the wares that they import. Beers produced for consumption in European Union countries are mandated to have an expiration date on the packaging. When the same breweries produce a batch for export to the United States, too often, off comes the expiration dating and on goes the Surgeon Generals warning.

It must be said that some imported beers do carry a freshness date, but they are vastly outnumbered by those that do not. Thus a consumer purchasing a six pack of imported Czech pilsner or English bitter may have no idea as to how long the product has been in the chain of distribution. In both examples freshness is as important as with any domestic ale or lager. Dust or label discoloration may give a clue that a beer has been too long on a retailers shelf, but even these are not always reliable indicators. At the Beverage Testing Institute it has been noticed that a number of bottles purchased at retail have failed the freshness test, sometimes to the point of being undrinkable. Ultimately, market pressure will be the only factor that will promote wide-scale introduction of useful freshness dating for imported beers. Until such time, consumers can use the following commonsense approaches to avoid being shortchanged with stale imported beer.

1. Try to purchase imports from reputable specialty stores with enthusiastic and knowledgeable staff.
2. Check the crown cap seal (if it is a bottled product) to see if there has been any seepage. If there has, then the bottle most likely has been subjected to heat abuse.
3. Dusty, discolored labels should not inspire confidence.
4. Always insist on returning skunky, out-of-condition beer for a refund (see our article on beer faults to know what to look for). This should be no problem if you heed the first point.

Packaging: Bottles, Cans, Widgets, and Growlers

What, if any, difference does packaging make? Surprisingly, it can be quite a significant factor. Following is a brief rundown of the major points of interest regarding the various "enclosures," or containers, in which beer is shipped and sold.
Clear versus colored glass bottles

If you have ever wondered why most beer bottles are amber or green, the answer is simple. The full spectrum of daylight can have undesirable effects on a beer over a period of time. The ultraviolet portion of the spectrum is especially harmful; promoting chemical reactions that produce "off flavors" that will take the edge off the freshness of a beer. Dark glass greatly inhibits this photochemical effect, whereas clear glass leaves the beer within vulnerable to being "light struck." The industry standard is for green or amber glass, but for some unfathomable reason a number of British breweries stick resolutely to their traditional practice of using clear glass bottles, with often undesirable consequences when such beers are left on a retailers shelf for any length of time.
Nitrogen capsules ("widgets")

Guinness introduced the nitrogen capsule, commonly known as the widget, in cans of Guinness Stout in the late 1980s. Subsequently, this device has caused many shirts and shoes to be soaked with beer as people discover for themselves the magic of nitrogen draft flow systems. Guinness served on draft acquires its creamy head when nitrogen bubbles are flushed through the beer at the time of serving. The widget is a small plastic capsule containing pressurized nitrogen gas that rushes out of a pinhole when the can is opened and the internal pressure is lowered. Widgets have now found their way into bottles as well as cans and have jumped species from Irish stouts to other ales, though not necessarily with the same levels of critical acclaim.
Aluminum cans

Aluminum cans are more popular at the economy/supermarket/bulk package end of the market than at the premium side. Packaging in aluminum cans does necessarily imply pasteurization. Although cans do not fit the image of the craft-brewed product, there is no technical reason why high-quality beer cannot be sold in cans, and, in fact, a number of craft brewers are launching canned products. A significant impediment to craft brewers using cans instead of bottles is the high capital cost of the pasteurization and packing equipment required. Among imports, British bitters are often shipped in aluminum cans, and a certain brand of Australian lager has forged an image by being sold in a large "oil can" size.
Growlers

A growler is a plastic or glass container used for selling fresh draft beer straight from the tap. Beer sold in this format, generally from a brewpub, must be refrigerated and then consumed within a day or two.
Bottle Conditioning: Living Beer

The term "living beer" can be either high praise or a slap in the face for a brewer. If the things that are "living" in the beer are microorganisms that ought not to be there, then it is bad news for a beer and its brewer.

Live beer, however, generally refers to the presence of noble yeasts left over from the brewing process. Beers that have been bottled unpasteurized and unfiltered, with a significant amount of live yeast, are called "bottle-conditioned" beers. The purpose of bottling beers in such a manner is to give them the potential to age and develop more complexity. Yeast inhibits oxidation and contributes complex flavors as it breaks down slowly in the bottle. Many Belgian ales are traditionally bottle conditioned through a secondary fermentation in the bottle, in a process similar to that which produces champagne.

An unpasteurized beer bottled with its yeast will not age in the manner of a conventionally processed beer. With age, bottle-conditioned beers develop a rounded, smoother mouthfeel, and over the course of years, often take on winey, vinous flavors.

Bottle conditioning is an economical means for small-scale craft brewers to bottle ales without the need for costly pasteurization or filtration equipment. How long one cellars bottle-conditioned beers is a matter of personal taste and will also depend on the specific character of the beer in question.

The following is a list of some of the top-rated, cellarable, bottle-conditioned beers we have reviewed. All or any of these would be highly recommended for a beer cellar (e.g., a cool cupboard in the basement). Suggested cellaring periods are in brackets, though they are only approximate cellaring times based on personal experiences and in some cases, brewery recommendations. Three gueuzes have been included for the simple reason that these beers have the best cellaring potential in the beer world. Frank Boon of Brouwerij Boon claims a 30-year cellar life for his gueuze beers.

* Brasserie dAchouffe (Belgium) NIce Chouffe (up to 5 years)
* Chimay (Belgium) Grand Reserve Blue (up to 5 years)
* Sinebrychoff (Finland) Porter 1996 Bottling (up to 5 years)
* King & Barnes (England) Millennium Ale (up to 10 years)
* J.W. Lees (England) Harvest Ale 1998 (up to 10 Years)
* Unibroue (Canada) Quelquechose (up to 10 years)
* Youngs (England) Old Nick Barley Wine (up to 10 years)
* Lindemans (Belgium) Gueuze Cuvée René (up to 15 years)
* Frank Boon (Belgium) Gueuze Mariage Parfait (up to 20 years)
* Cantillon (Belgium) Gueuze (up to 20 years)
* Eldridge Pope (England) Thomas Hardys Ale (up to 20 years)

The Bar: Drink Locally, Think Globally

As a consequence of the craft beer revolution, there is a vast choice of beer from abroad and closer to home. When confronted by a line of tap handles stretching the full length of the bar, do not overlook your local craft brewer. Independent local breweries are the backbone of any serious beer-drinking culture and should not be taken for granted in the competitive commercial environment. Recognize that a beer brewed in smaller quantities with 100% malted barley and high-quality hops will necessarily cost a little extra. Fresh, well-brewed beer that has traveled only a small number of miles will invariably taste better than an equivalent beer that left the brewery a few months ago. Indeed, a draft beer that has traveled a great distance will certainly have been pasteurized, thus is slightly handicapped from the start. The flip side to this is that a pasteurized imported keg of beer will certainly last longer when it is tapped than an unpasteurized, "live," craft beer. The latter needs to be drunk fresh. A conscientious draft bar should keep a few tap handles devoted to local craft brews and ensure that they remain fresh.

If a beer fails to live up to its obligation of being fresh, send it back over the bar-politely of course. Beer condition must always be the primary concern of any good bar. When confronted by a long line of tap handles, your first question to the bartender should be, "Whats fresh?"
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
post #5 of 76
Thread Starter 
Yeah, but that seems to be written for those with discriminating tastes.

Most of my school and capital city friends aren't that far removed from key light kegs. So I mean, "what's the special" is usually the question at the bar; not "what's fresh." That said, I did manage to do the finger lakes wine tasting thing last weekend in new york. The finger lakes has the country's second-largest wine-producing region in the country. It has something to do with the "microclimate" the lakes create, and so on, etc. Anyway, but I'm still a boxed wine man myself.
post #6 of 76
Bro, I will paypal you a 12 pack if you don't drink that Molson.
"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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post #7 of 76
You know beer costs so much you can't just buy some more.
post #8 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Beer is a Perishable Product

Beer is a foodstuff. As with most foodstuffs, beer is perishable-it deteriorates as a result of the action of bacteria, light, and air. However, unlike other food products, packaged beer is not legally mandated to carry a "sell by" date. Nonetheless, some domestic beer sold in the United States does carry a freshness date. The Boston Beer Company was among the first to use freshness dating, as far back as 1985. Anheuser-Busch has followed suit with its much-publicized "born on" dates. There are still many breweries, large and small, which do not send all their beers to market with a freshness date, but the trend is certainly moving in the right direction.
Stabilization
Prior to bottling, a typical commercial ale or lager will undergo some form of stabilization to extend its shelf life. The two primary forms of stabilization are sterile filtration, in which the beer is passed through a microporous filter that will not let through any "crunchy bits" larger than 0.5 microns; and pasteurization, whereby the beer is heated briefly to kill any microbial wildlife. Both approaches are widely used, though a number of brewers have noted that sterile filtration strips some hop flavors from their ales. A third, traditional option for preparing a beer for its journey in a bottle to your glass, "bottle conditioning," is dealt with later.

Freshness period: The drinking window

The length of time it takes for a beer to become stale (a papery note, dulled hop character, or other off flavors) is determined by the alcoholic strength and hopping level of the beer. Both alcohol and hops help preserve beer. Thus hoppier, stronger beers keep for longer. Typically, the freshness period for a lager is four months; for stronger craft-brewed ales, five months. High-gravity, high-strength beers such as doppelbocks typically carry a six- to twelve-month freshness period. All of the preceding assumes proper handling of the beer.

How can you determine the "drinking window" of a beer? It depends on the dating system used by the brewery. Taking a typical example of Boston Beers Samuel Adams brands, the freshness period is the time between shipment from the brewery and the freshness date, or "consume by" date, marked on the label or capsule. In the case of a beer with a "born on" date (Anheuser-Busch products, for example), the freshness period is approximately four months after the date on the label.
Imports: A note of caution

Imported beer can have a rough ride on its way to your local retailer. First, it must undergo a sea voyage, hopefully in temperature-controlled containers, or "reefers," in industry parlance. After sitting in the bonded customs warehouse (hopefully, air conditioned), it must pass through an importers warehouse and then be shipped to a wholesalers warehouse. In the best case, the local wholesaler will have temperature-controlled storage and an efficient stock

control system, although this is an area of commerce that is not renowned for sympathetic handling of product or startling efficiency with stock. One thing is for sure-at any moment of time in the Byzantine system of beer distribution in the United States, a prodigious amount of imported beer is sitting in warehouses slowly undergoing the inexorable effects of aging.

This is not to suggest that many imported beers do not find their way to us in perfect condition. However, one is not reassured by the reluctance of virtually all beer importers to put freshness dating on the wares that they import. Beers produced for consumption in European Union countries are mandated to have an expiration date on the packaging. When the same breweries produce a batch for export to the United States, too often, off comes the expiration dating and on goes the Surgeon Generals warning.

It must be said that some imported beers do carry a freshness date, but they are vastly outnumbered by those that do not. Thus a consumer purchasing a six pack of imported Czech pilsner or English bitter may have no idea as to how long the product has been in the chain of distribution. In both examples freshness is as important as with any domestic ale or lager. Dust or label discoloration may give a clue that a beer has been too long on a retailers shelf, but even these are not always reliable indicators. At the Beverage Testing Institute it has been noticed that a number of bottles purchased at retail have failed the freshness test, sometimes to the point of being undrinkable. Ultimately, market pressure will be the only factor that will promote wide-scale introduction of useful freshness dating for imported beers. Until such time, consumers can use the following commonsense approaches to avoid being shortchanged with stale imported beer.

1. Try to purchase imports from reputable specialty stores with enthusiastic and knowledgeable staff.
2. Check the crown cap seal (if it is a bottled product) to see if there has been any seepage. If there has, then the bottle most likely has been subjected to heat abuse.
3. Dusty, discolored labels should not inspire confidence.
4. Always insist on returning skunky, out-of-condition beer for a refund (see our article on beer faults to know what to look for). This should be no problem if you heed the first point.

Packaging: Bottles, Cans, Widgets, and Growlers

What, if any, difference does packaging make? Surprisingly, it can be quite a significant factor. Following is a brief rundown of the major points of interest regarding the various "enclosures," or containers, in which beer is shipped and sold.
Clear versus colored glass bottles

If you have ever wondered why most beer bottles are amber or green, the answer is simple. The full spectrum of daylight can have undesirable effects on a beer over a period of time. The ultraviolet portion of the spectrum is especially harmful; promoting chemical reactions that produce "off flavors" that will take the edge off the freshness of a beer. Dark glass greatly inhibits this photochemical effect, whereas clear glass leaves the beer within vulnerable to being "light struck." The industry standard is for green or amber glass, but for some unfathomable reason a number of British breweries stick resolutely to their traditional practice of using clear glass bottles, with often undesirable consequences when such beers are left on a retailers shelf for any length of time.
Nitrogen capsules ("widgets")

Guinness introduced the nitrogen capsule, commonly known as the widget, in cans of Guinness Stout in the late 1980s. Subsequently, this device has caused many shirts and shoes to be soaked with beer as people discover for themselves the magic of nitrogen draft flow systems. Guinness served on draft acquires its creamy head when nitrogen bubbles are flushed through the beer at the time of serving. The widget is a small plastic capsule containing pressurized nitrogen gas that rushes out of a pinhole when the can is opened and the internal pressure is lowered. Widgets have now found their way into bottles as well as cans and have jumped species from Irish stouts to other ales, though not necessarily with the same levels of critical acclaim.
Aluminum cans

Aluminum cans are more popular at the economy/supermarket/bulk package end of the market than at the premium side. Packaging in aluminum cans does necessarily imply pasteurization. Although cans do not fit the image of the craft-brewed product, there is no technical reason why high-quality beer cannot be sold in cans, and, in fact, a number of craft brewers are launching canned products. A significant impediment to craft brewers using cans instead of bottles is the high capital cost of the pasteurization and packing equipment required. Among imports, British bitters are often shipped in aluminum cans, and a certain brand of Australian lager has forged an image by being sold in a large "oil can" size.
Growlers

A growler is a plastic or glass container used for selling fresh draft beer straight from the tap. Beer sold in this format, generally from a brewpub, must be refrigerated and then consumed within a day or two.
Bottle Conditioning: Living Beer

The term "living beer" can be either high praise or a slap in the face for a brewer. If the things that are "living" in the beer are microorganisms that ought not to be there, then it is bad news for a beer and its brewer.

Live beer, however, generally refers to the presence of noble yeasts left over from the brewing process. Beers that have been bottled unpasteurized and unfiltered, with a significant amount of live yeast, are called "bottle-conditioned" beers. The purpose of bottling beers in such a manner is to give them the potential to age and develop more complexity. Yeast inhibits oxidation and contributes complex flavors as it breaks down slowly in the bottle. Many Belgian ales are traditionally bottle conditioned through a secondary fermentation in the bottle, in a process similar to that which produces champagne.

An unpasteurized beer bottled with its yeast will not age in the manner of a conventionally processed beer. With age, bottle-conditioned beers develop a rounded, smoother mouthfeel, and over the course of years, often take on winey, vinous flavors.

Bottle conditioning is an economical means for small-scale craft brewers to bottle ales without the need for costly pasteurization or filtration equipment. How long one cellars bottle-conditioned beers is a matter of personal taste and will also depend on the specific character of the beer in question.

The following is a list of some of the top-rated, cellarable, bottle-conditioned beers we have reviewed. All or any of these would be highly recommended for a beer cellar (e.g., a cool cupboard in the basement). Suggested cellaring periods are in brackets, though they are only approximate cellaring times based on personal experiences and in some cases, brewery recommendations. Three gueuzes have been included for the simple reason that these beers have the best cellaring potential in the beer world. Frank Boon of Brouwerij Boon claims a 30-year cellar life for his gueuze beers.

* Brasserie dAchouffe (Belgium) NIce Chouffe (up to 5 years)
* Chimay (Belgium) Grand Reserve Blue (up to 5 years)
* Sinebrychoff (Finland) Porter 1996 Bottling (up to 5 years)
* King & Barnes (England) Millennium Ale (up to 10 years)
* J.W. Lees (England) Harvest Ale 1998 (up to 10 Years)
* Unibroue (Canada) Quelquechose (up to 10 years)
* Youngs (England) Old Nick Barley Wine (up to 10 years)
* Lindemans (Belgium) Gueuze Cuvée René (up to 15 years)
* Frank Boon (Belgium) Gueuze Mariage Parfait (up to 20 years)
* Cantillon (Belgium) Gueuze (up to 20 years)
* Eldridge Pope (England) Thomas Hardys Ale (up to 20 years)

The Bar: Drink Locally, Think Globally

As a consequence of the craft beer revolution, there is a vast choice of beer from abroad and closer to home. When confronted by a line of tap handles stretching the full length of the bar, do not overlook your local craft brewer. Independent local breweries are the backbone of any serious beer-drinking culture and should not be taken for granted in the competitive commercial environment. Recognize that a beer brewed in smaller quantities with 100% malted barley and high-quality hops will necessarily cost a little extra. Fresh, well-brewed beer that has traveled only a small number of miles will invariably taste better than an equivalent beer that left the brewery a few months ago. Indeed, a draft beer that has traveled a great distance will certainly have been pasteurized, thus is slightly handicapped from the start. The flip side to this is that a pasteurized imported keg of beer will certainly last longer when it is tapped than an unpasteurized, "live," craft beer. The latter needs to be drunk fresh. A conscientious draft bar should keep a few tap handles devoted to local craft brews and ensure that they remain fresh.

If a beer fails to live up to its obligation of being fresh, send it back over the bar-politely of course. Beer condition must always be the primary concern of any good bar. When confronted by a long line of tap handles, your first question to the bartender should be, "Whats fresh?"

To much information. And I mean that in the plainest sense possible.
post #9 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

You know beer costs so much you can't just buy some more.

For someone living on a grad student budget...

Uh... yeah.

post #10 of 76
I ticked you can drink it because it's got alcohol in it so I figure it's alright but I don't really know for sure. So if you drink it and get sick, you'll know I should have voted for the third choice in the poll.

'kay?
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #11 of 76
Toss it. Stale beer is no good. Beer isn't wine or whisky. If you are that desperate for alcohol, try moonshine?
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Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
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post #12 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Bro, I will paypal you a 12 pack if you don't drink that Molson.

How else is he supposed to get it up for your mom? We can't all have fluffers like Rachel Ray does!
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
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post #13 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

So yes, this is a travesty and I probably don't deserve an answer to this question.

However, I have neglected half a case of Molson in my closet. I'd like to say "misplaced" or "forgotten" but honestly I just don't drink beer much in my apartment during the semester. I was elsewhere last summer, and the same pattern repeated itself this past year. But now I'm here and wondering how drinkable 2 year old beer is. I just bought a case of Sam Adams Summer Styles (Boston Lager, Light, Hefeweizen, Summer Ale, Cherry Wheat, Pale Ale) and a case of Coors Light (the 16 ounce plastic bottles... quality ) so my guess is that I can slip the old beer under people's alcohol-deadened taste buds after a while.

What do you think?

There is a simple way to find out: Chill one, and pop the bitch open. It could be OK. My thinking is it has more to do with the tightness of the seal and the temperature at which it was kept. If there was too much variation, it may have "skunked."

I once let almost a full case of Lager (Yeungling for you not from the area) chill and then get warm. BAD idea. I'm considering a memorial plaque to that case from all those years ago. Poor guy didn't have a chance.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #14 of 76
Who cares? The fact that you just don't taste test it and instead pose a question about it on these internets means you should have both your testicles removed. Stop being a friggin' wimp and just taste it. If you really want to entertain us you should have friend at the ready with a camera to capture your reaction shot.

Finally, if it is bad, you must do something cool and stupid with it and yourself as penance. I'm looking forward to a YouTube video of Jackass:ShawnJ edition where you turn yourself into a human bowling ball and knock over pins of bad beer or something to that effect.

In summary... stop wimping out... and oh... entertain me now.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #15 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

Who cares? The fact that you just don't taste test it and instead pose a question about it on these internets means you should have both your testicles removed. Stop being a friggin' wimp and just taste it. If you really want to entertain us you should have friend at the ready with a camera to capture your reaction shot.

Finally, if it is bad, you must do something cool and stupid with it and yourself as penance. I'm looking forward to a YouTube video of Jackass:ShawnJ edition where you turn yourself into a human bowling ball and knock over pins of bad beer or something to that effect.

In summary... stop wimping out... and oh... entertain me now.

You know, on second though....yes. I agree. We should mock Shawn endlessly for this. I mean, who does this:

Man find beer. Old beer, but beer.

Man wonders if beer is driinkable.

Instead of testing it out, Man (used loosely) decided to post a query on his favorite internet site...complete with a poll.

Man hereby must pay us back for the time we've invested.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #16 of 76
Thread Starter 


Yes, to all of the above.
post #17 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

For someone living on a grad student budget...

Uh... yeah.


Any grad student that doesn't know where to find free beer should not graduate.
post #18 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

Any grad student that doesn't know where to find free beer should not graduate.

Well, it'll be a fun weekend.

Hope you have fun, Mr. Negativity.
post #19 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

Any grad student that doesn't know where to find free beer should not graduate.

Ok, well, I'm not a grad student...

So how do you "find" free beer?

Enlighten me.
"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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post #20 of 76
my suggestion is drink one against another brand and by the time you get to the third test brand it won't matter.
imho--drink drink drink.....who cares.....so long as you do it in the privacy of your own place.....no one will know, and if they complain about it, they have to buy you a replacement pack cheers
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
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I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
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post #21 of 76
Some people age beer. The same rules apply to wine: keep it in a cool and dark place.
Cat: the other white meat
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Cat: the other white meat
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post #22 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Well, it'll be a fun weekend.

Hope you have fun, Mr. Negativity.

Don't you know a joke when you read it, jackass? You're like artman.
post #23 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

Don't you know a joke when you read it, jackass? You're like artman.

Mmm okay.

You should work on the delivery a little bit. Just sayin'

post #24 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Ok, well, I'm not a grad student...

So how do you "find" free beer?

Enlighten me.

Uh...parties?
post #25 of 76
Thread Starter 
Yeah did the mooching thing two weeks ago with Prosecco, white wine, and jack daniels.

Potent combo, if you ask me.

Especially when you drank that stuff playing Kings.
post #26 of 76
If no other beer is available, it is very drinkable.
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post #27 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Mmm okay.

You should work on the delivery a little bit. Just sayin'


Yea because kicking someone out of grad school because they can't find free beer is a serious comment. Pull the stick out of your ass you smug prick.
post #28 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

Yea because kicking someone out of grad school because they can't find free beer is a serious comment. Pull the stick out of your ass you smug prick.

Wah wah.

Lighten up yourself man.
post #29 of 76
If you do decide to drink the beer, make a YouTube video... it might end up being your last will and testament.

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #30 of 76
Thread Starter 
Verdict: Well, I wish I could remember.

I do remember that the Cherry Wheats didn't really do anything for me. I just don't like cherry-flavored beer. It tastes too artificial or cloying for me: like cherry candy. I do enjoy Lindeman's Framboise (possibly the sweetest beer ever) but it's great! The hefeweizen, pale ale and summer ale were great. Boston lager and light were about what you'd expect.
post #31 of 76
What? No "Beer" poll option?
post #32 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

What? No "Beer" poll option?

Hey, this isn't AN
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post #33 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Verdict: Well, I wish I could remember.

I do remember that the Cherry Wheats didn't really do anything for me. I just don't like cherry-flavored beer. It tastes too artificial or cloying for me: like cherry candy. I do enjoy Lindeman's Framboise (possibly the sweetest beer ever) but it's great! The hefeweizen, pale ale and summer ale were great. Boston lager and light were about what you'd expect.

Verdict: It's just molsons dude.

Life's too short to drink skunky cheap beer. Make sure it's really cold and feed it to your buddies and keep the Sam Adams for yourself.
post #34 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

So yes, this is a travesty and I probably don't deserve an answer to this question.

However, I have neglected half a case of Molson in my closet. I'd like to say "misplaced" or "forgotten" but honestly I just don't drink beer much in my apartment during the semester. I was elsewhere last summer, and the same pattern repeated itself this past year. But now I'm here and wondering how drinkable 2 year old beer is. I just bought a case of Sam Adams Summer Styles (Boston Lager, Light, Hefeweizen, Summer Ale, Cherry Wheat, Pale Ale) and a case of Coors Light (the 16 ounce plastic bottles... quality ) so my guess is that I can slip the old beer under people's alcohol-deadened taste buds after a while.

What do you think?

I think you should try some Stella Artois
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stella_Artois

Proper beer. Molson??? ZOMG
post #35 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

I think you should try some Stella Artois
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stella_Artois

Love it.

That goes for 6-7 in some parts. At the bar a few blocks from me, you get it in the Stella glass for like 3. Pretty good stuff.
post #36 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Love it.

That goes for 6-7 in some parts. At the bar a few blocks from me, you get it in the Stella glass for like 3. Pretty good stuff.


<bump>

So did you try it? You better have, lest the flogging you will endure will be utterly merciless.
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post #37 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

<bump>

So did you try it? You better have, lest the flogging you will endure will be utterly merciless.

Yeah ... if it has skunked a little, you can always just spike it with lemonade and call it a shandy.
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post #38 of 76
Thread Starter 
Still good!*

I don't notice any skunky aromas. It's definitely better than the Coors Light I have in the fridge. I think what kept it in good condition was being in a dark, temperature- stable closet for the whole time. The glass is also brown, which apparently is the best protection against light anyway.

*I wouldn't reach for this beer first, however.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

Yeah ... if it has skunked a little, you can always just spike it with lemonade and call it a shandy.



That's awesome. A nice change from the usual fare typically drunk at ironic paper bag 40's parties.

"High gravity? Olde English? Nah man, I'm drinking Shandy Bass."
post #39 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galley View Post

I once found a 5-year old case of beer. It wasn't bad. Of course, we drank it. Poor college students will drink anything, especially if it's free!



as long as it is still well sealed.......
God i am so tied doing this mess!
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post #40 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Still good!*

I don't notice any skunky aromas. It's definitely better than the Coors Light I have in the fridge. I think what kept it in good condition was being in a dark, temperature- stable closet for the whole time. The glass is also brown, which apparently is the best protection against light anyway.

*I wouldn't reach for this beer first, however.


It's Canadian beer anyway, so I'm sure it tastes the same either way.

Quote:





That's awesome. A nice change from the usual fare typically drunk at ironic paper bag 40's parties.

"High gravity? Olde English? Nah man, I'm drinking Shandy Bass."

Niiiicce. Gay, but nice.
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