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Study suggests most of Japan not bonkers over iPhone - Page 2

post #41 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by siegling View Post

...don't think out of the gate the iPhone is meant to play into the Japanese Cell Phone Experience, so they won't be doing the usual things they may be used to. My point being it's a pretty unique market.

Correct. Japanese consumers are light years ahead of us in how they use their cells phones. Every day they use their phones in ways that might seem like science fiction to Americans. Advice to Steve Jobs: Take a trip to Japan and figure out that market. It'll benefit us all.
post #42 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

How often does a battery need changing? I know of no one that has gone out to get spare cell phone batteries*. It's a feature that people want but will not use. In the past, a user-replaceable battery was how you reset your phone when it locked up on you.

I certainly have and know others as well. No one carries an extra battery with them on a day to day basis. But for business, having a spare one in your briefcase is not a big deal.

And please, we're not talking about some cheapo LG phone that cracks open when you drop it. The iPhone is built solid and making a user replaceable battery that doesn't fall out is not rocket science.

Of course, it's all about money. I know it won't ever happen...just as iPods have never had user replaceable batteries either.
post #43 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by satchmo View Post

Of course, it's all about money. I know it won't ever happen...just as iPods have never had user replaceable batteries either.

When the item in question is owned for longer than the life of the battery then this will be an issue... right now the lifespan of the device does not call for a replaceable battery.
post #44 of 164
You know, if it's complexity the Japanese crave, I'm sure some enterprising software developer could step in with some kind of completely gnarly app.

Endless screen of buttons and pulsating widgets and soft switches that make things fly around and count down and glow and change sizes. Mr. Salaryman waiting for the train could be sufficiently diverted, I would think.

The point being that the iPhone is only as simple and elegant as the apps you choose to install.
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post #45 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by satchmo View Post

But for business, having a spare one in your briefcase is not a big deal.

I carry two spare laptop batteris with me, but I need 8 hours+ for long flights. I would have purchased a MacBook Air if it had a bigger battery or a way of extending the life. An external battery pack being the better option over having to remove my TechShell, fine a coin which I tend not to carry, replace the battery and put it all back together.

Quote:
And please, we're not talking about some cheapo LG phone that cracks open when you drop it. The iPhone is built solid and making a user replaceable battery that doesn't fall out is not rocket science.

It's not rocket science, it's chemical and mechanical engineering. You mention that the iPhone is "solid" and you are absolutely correct. But it's solid because it designed to be a solid device with no latches and compartments. Besides lowering the durability, adding a user removable cover for the battery increases the thickness and the cost.

Thicker & Costlier How?: Now the battery can't be connected directly to the system board and it requires a special case of its own because it could be accessed by the consumer. It also requires a plastic barrier between the battery tray and the rest of the non-user-replaceable components. The battery also has to be on the back side and which limits the engineering options.


Quote:
Of course, it's all about money. I know it won't ever happen...just as iPods have never had user replaceable batteries either.

I don't buy this argument as you stated it. There aren't a lot of people lining up to have their batteries replaced. In fact, at this point all iPhone battery replacements would be under warranty.

If they are trying to save money, it's not creating a market of replacing batteries, but by incurring higher net profits over their competitors by not having a user-replaceable battery. The iPhone isn't for everybody, if you need a 2nd battery one of the many, many battery packs that connect to the iPod connector underneath or plugging into the USB of a PC is not a viable option then the device is not for you. There has never been an iPod with a user-replaceable battery, so I don't know why this issue is still being discussed almost 7 years later as if Apple just threw a curveball.
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post #46 of 164
Considering there are 127 million Japanese, Apple could sell up to 10 million there- great!
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post #47 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatapc View Post

Correct. Japanese consumers are light years ahead of us in how they use their cells phones. Every day they use their phones in ways that might seem like science fiction to Americans. Advice to Steve Jobs: Take a trip to Japan and figure out that market. It'll benefit us all.

It is interesting to fathom whether the iPhone is a truly universal device. Every country and culture has its own aesthetics and taste, even in a global economy. I suppose the Gap and MickeyD have proven it's possible to sell the same thing to everyone. Maybe the iPhone with it's different apps can crack the world wide market as well.
post #48 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambrose Bierce View Post

I suppose the Gap and MickeyD have proven it's possible to sell the same thing to everyone. Maybe the iPhone with it's different apps can crack the world wide market as well.

I can't speak for the Gap, but McDonalds alters it's menu vastly for different cultures.
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post #49 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

You know, if it's complexity the Japanese crave, I'm sure some enterprising software developer could step in with some kind of completely gnarly app.

Endless screen of buttons and pulsating widgets and soft switches that make things fly around and count down and glow and change sizes. Mr. Salaryman waiting for the train could be sufficiently diverted, I would think.

beautiful

isn't it in Japan where they have those electronic "pets" which the owner has
to feed and water and play with? It would seem that someone could pretty
easily develop something like that for the iPhone also.
post #50 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

beautiful

isn't it in Japan where they have those electronic "pets" which the owner has
to feed and water and play with? It would seem that someone could pretty
easily develop something like that for the iPhone also.

Certainly. Let there be no doubt, there will be a metric ton of games available through the App Store.

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post #51 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Certainly. Let there be no doubt, there will be a metric ton of games available through the App Store.

Granted the app store will have games galore by every fledgling developer on the planet, but the iPhone's success will come from the big boys (AE?) porting over there stuff.
post #52 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It's not rocket science, it's chemical and mechanical engineering. You mention that the iPhone is "solid" and you are absolutely correct. But it's solid because it designed to be a solid device with no latches and compartments. Besides lowering the durability, adding a user removable cover for the battery increases the thickness and the cost.

I'm not sure that lower durability is an unavoidable result. From my experience, many Nokia phones seem to break down consistently when dropped really hard. (Battery, the detachable battery cover and the rest.) I think it's intentional on the designers' part. Whatever part of impact gets absorbed in that, does not contribute to actual damage to components or cracks on the shell. Replacing the battery, the cover and restarting the phone only takes seconds and isn't an issue.

Added cost is not a reason. Even the very cheapest phones I have seen have replaceable batteries, and margins are razor thin on them. Surely the battery would be made integral on some of those phones if that could save more than a few cents.

A separate battery cover is optional, as the battery can be made a part of the shell. Yes, still takes a little more material for the inner battery compartment wall than there'd be if the battery was integral, but not much.
post #53 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gon View Post

I'm not sure that lower durability is an unavoidable result. From my experience, many Nokia phones seem to break down consistently when dropped really hard. (Battery, the detachable battery cover and the rest.) I think it's intentional on the designers' part. Whatever part of impact gets absorbed in that, does not contribute to actual damage to components or cracks on the shell. Replacing the battery, the cover and restarting the phone only takes seconds and isn't an issue.

Added cost is not a reason. Even the very cheapest phones I have seen have replaceable batteries, and margins are razor thin on them. Surely the battery would be made integral on some of those phones if that could save more than a few cents.

A separate battery cover is optional, as the battery can be made a part of the shell. Yes, still takes a little more material for the inner battery compartment wall than there'd be if the battery was integral, but not much.

Excellent rebuttal, Gon.
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post #54 of 164
Everyone talks about how advanced Jap mobiles are and I admit that they sure look bling-bling but geeze some of them are bulky and the interfaces are god-awful. Thought I'd share some experiences with Jap phones...

1. "advanced Japanese phones"

Yes sure they're stacked with features but most of them are totally useless. Some people use them, I wager most don't, eg I have Japanese friends with TV One-seg phones who have never used the TV and don't know how, in fact they don't use the GPS, the electronic purchasing or any of those things - they bought the phones because they were top end 900-series with 'perceived cachet'...possible iphone buyers. That's not to say people don't use the features - just that I believe a sizeable number just don't know how.

2. 3.2MP+ cameraphones

Well, mostly, these suck. Squeezing in more megapixels doesn't, by itself, result in better pics. I still have an old Canon 3.2 MP point-and-shoot that takes immensely superior pics to my g/friend's recent DoCoMo Sharp 3.2 phone, it's flash - like many camera phones - is literally useless. Maybe a Sony Cybershot camera phone hits the right notes but I don't really know - it does seem the Sony makes you choose between a decent camera-phone or a decent walkman-type phone though. iPhone already creams the walkman segment...

I would venture that Apple will include a better camera when they feel there's a business case to do so (that is, a better quality lens, flash etc) that fits the phone's profile, battery usage etc Oh and also fits Apple's profit margin!

3. One-seg TV.

Come on, this sucks b**ls. the quality is never consistent - to the guy who said he watched the ball game on the way home and wouldn't give that up: a. If you caught the subway, then I don't believe you frankly because it doesn't work underground - and if not on the underground then the quality is still iffy as the trains pass under bridges, weave through concrete canyons. If you're stationary in a good reception area then fine but I can't believe it's a deal-breaker for everyone currently with keitei-TV.

4. Spare batteries.

Can someone tell me if they've ever seen people carrying spare batteries and changing them - Japan or anywhere? As a previous poster said, this argument has been around since the first iPod and doesn't seem to do any harm. I don't carry a spare battery and the 2 times in the last 2 years I've been caught short on battery I've popped into a Softbank (or Vodafone before it) shop and plugged it in to recharge for 15 mins for free. I notice many Japanese also do this too. Battery argument might be relevant for a few but not for the many.

5. Bluetooth.

My understanding is bluetooth stereo is pretty poor. Again, if Apple can make that work at an acceptable quality without being a MASSIVE DRAIN on battery, then I guess you'll see it.


Japanese phones sure have plenty of features but many are of dubious value. Simply putting these things on a spec sheet sure looks good but doesn't necessarily provide a value proposition. Same as saying your PC's specs are 'upgradeable' knowing full well that you'll just buy a whole new one when upgrading time comes around.

I'm convinced the iPhone's specific appeal will carve out a healthy niche here. iPods are popular here despite the long-time presence of heavyweight electronic brand-name competition, I believe the iPhone will follow that trend.

The interesting thing will be the included plan. Softbank has a US$100 approx plan for smart phones but I wonder if a more affordable option will be available with iPhone. I have an Emobile USB 3G card for my iBook with 7.2mbits speed (in the right area) and 100Gig 'unlimited' traffic - for US$50 per month. So a cheaper plan is definitely possible....

Roll on July 11...
post #55 of 164
A bit busy to respond right now at length, but my wife and I live in Japan and ordered two iPhones. She says Japanese input on her cell phone (a three year old AU model) beats the iPod Touch hands down, but she prefers the Touch in my other ways.

Personally, I don't see why Apple has not put video into the phone.

However, I recently saw a video from a wedding in the US, the day after I went to a wedding in Japan. At the US event, most guests used cameras to take photos. At the Japan event, the only true cameras were in the photographers' hands; all of the guests pulled out their cell phones. The first video mail of the cake-cutting reached my phone while the bride and groom were still chewing. By the time I got home, enough friends had mailed me videos for me to put together a quick video presentation without using any of my own footage. I walked home from the event hall in five minutes.

That said, I am looking forward to the my iPhone and to see what impact it will have on the future of phones in Japan.

 

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post #56 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambrose Bierce View Post

When the item in question is owned for longer than the life of the battery then this will be an issue... right now the lifespan of the device does not call for a replaceable battery.

I agree 60%. LOL. In reality, my several year old iPod 5g, which got used hours and hours per day is still going strong on its original battery, and never ran the battery down during the day where I was without function. That's a strong argument for the "don't need a user changeable battery" in iPods.

My iPhone, on the other hand, is a different story. The battery life on it, if you do a lot of surfing or are in areas with weak signals, is abysmal. I more than once got the 20% battery warning, 10% battery warning, and then dead phone (all within a few minutes!) back in the early days. Then I learned you just had to keep a charger in the car, and on the desk, and keep the thing plugged in whenever possible. A pain, but do-able.

A "spare" battery has the advantage of "change and go", not "wait for a charge and go", and is small enough to keep in your pocket where ever you are. Not true about a USB port/charger.

Battery life was such an issue for me, I jumped on the Mophie Juicepack when it became available. It's been a real blessing on occasions, keeping me on the road, albeit with a bulkier phone, when in the past I'd have been dead-battery city.

edit: someone above asked if anyone has ever seen someone carry a spare battery and change them in real life. YES. ME! With both my old Razr and my Treo 700P. It just depends on how much you use the device during the day, doesn't it?
post #57 of 164
1) 9% of 103 million (Japan subscriber market) = 9,270.000 ~9 million iPhones!

2) a survey with 400 respondents? Get serious!

Japan is not the best market for Apple because they are way ahead, the iPhone is not big improvement for them.

The best market for Apple's iPhone is developing countries where iPhones are like cars for Americans, people will buy them to flash to chicks, they will buy it on credit, etc.

Notwithstanding, 9% in a country where the iPhone is no big deal is amazing!

Just imagine if Apple would pull off 9% of 1.1 billion global market (or current subscriber base)?
~99 million?!

Think about it!

And the Macs that the iPhone will bring in?!
post #58 of 164
has anyone seen new cell phones released in Japan this year? iPhone is like a grandma technology compare to them. 2 megapixle camera is such a turn off because 5 megapixle is already a new standstard over there, not to mention they have so many phones equipped with little antenna that you can watch live TV. plus iPhone is not a clamshell cell phone, which is very unlikely to be appealing to female users in Japan
post #59 of 164
I don't get how they are comparing Japan to the rest of the world, when their tiny survey covered ONLY Japan, with no data from elsewhere.

That said, I'll make my GUESS as to what the same survey would say in the US: more than 90% of people have no "plans" to buy an iPhone.

Imagine walking down the street in the US and asking random people if they already specifically "plan" to buy an iPhone. If more than 1 in 10 said yes, I'd be shocked. 1 in 10 people is a lot of people, to my mind--and that's AFTER the price drop.
post #60 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddieaus View Post

has anyone seen new cell phones released in Japan this year? iPhone is like a grandma technology compare to them. 2 megapixle camera is such a turn off because 5 megapixle is already a new standstard over there, not to mention they have so many phones equipped with little antenna that you can watch live TV. plus iPhone is not a clamshell cell phone, which is very unlikely to be appealing to female users in Japan

"has anyone seen new cell phones released in Japan this year?"

I've seen them. Same crappy interfaces and TOO many features that are of average quality. Every year the same thing.

I love how the "grandma technology" has scared Sharp enough this year to intro new phones with full screen, touch (single, not multi) ability, touting web browsing (but still the same carp browser) and more teeny-tiny buttons.

If this foreign company with only it's upgraded 1st handset (just one model!) takes 9% of the Japanese market as suggested in the survey, that's got to be seen as a major blow to the domestic manufacturers. I think the manufactures (certainly Sharp) have seen this - hence the semi-look alike phones they released.
post #61 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambrose Bierce View Post

I suppose the Gap and MickeyD have proven it's possible to sell the same thing to everyone.

Actually, Gap stores in Japan have a different selection and are aimed at a higher price bracket than Gap stores in the U.S. You won't find more than a small number of items below ¥1500 at Gap Japan. This is because Gap would lose to Uniqlo (a Japanese clothing company with the same philosophy as the American Gap/Old Navy) so quickly, that it was forced to adopt to the Japanese market.

I think the iPhone can succeed in Japan, but its potential relevance in Japanese culture compared to the West will probably be minimal. I think the lack of 1Seg TV in particular will be unfavorable to Apple. The PSP and DS have 1Seg tuners in Japan, and the PSP version of the accessory in particular has been very popular. I also would love to use my iPhone as a Mobile Suica device to pay for my train rides.

And even if the features of Japanese phones are fluff, the fact of the matter is that their basic usage still matches the best most American made phones can do. They get this "fluff" on top of everything that an American will perceive of as a complete package. Whereas Apple will actually remove features some deem vital, Japanese companies have seldom ever removed something even remotely useful. Therefore, criticizing this approach makes no sense whatsoever because consumers lose nothing.
post #62 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpiddly View Post


For example, ATI has made some graphics cards that a physically more "advanced" then their nvidia counterparts, but when these cards are tested in the real world the nvidia cards almost always win.

Uh, nah!

Only for games. For pro apps, ATI wipes the floor with Nvidia. Same thing for video.
post #63 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I just sold my iPhone for $485. I forwarded the number to my Skype In number and will be cellphone-free for the next 3.35 weeks.

You really are too much.
post #64 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatapc View Post

Correct. Japanese consumers are light years ahead of us in how they use their cells phones. Every day they use their phones in ways that might seem like science fiction to Americans. Advice to Steve Jobs: Take a trip to Japan and figure out that market. It'll benefit us all.

It's also been argued that those very same uses, such as paying a vending machine etc. are very risky, security-wise, and that's one reason why they haven't appeared elsewhere.
post #65 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

Considering there are 127 million Japanese, Apple could sell up to 10 million there- great!

Not really.

It's a percentage of the cell owning public, not every infant, and oldster in a nursing home.

Also, most people simply won't change carriers.

The number could be closer to two to three million. Still not bad.
post #66 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddieaus View Post

has anyone seen new cell phones released in Japan this year? iPhone is like a grandma technology compare to them. 2 megapixle camera is such a turn off because 5 megapixle is already a new standstard over there, not to mention they have so many phones equipped with little antenna that you can watch live TV. plus iPhone is not a clamshell cell phone, which is very unlikely to be appealing to female users in Japan

...and, let me guess... their batteries last for about 15 minutes.

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post #67 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by modz View Post

"has anyone seen new cell phones released in Japan this year?"

I've seen them. Same crappy interfaces and TOO many features that are of average quality. Every year the same thing.

I love how the "grandma technology" has scared Sharp enough this year to intro new phones with full screen, touch (single, not multi) ability, touting web browsing (but still the same carp browser) and more teeny-tiny buttons.

If this foreign company with only it's upgraded 1st handset (just one model!) takes 9% of the Japanese market as suggested in the survey, that's got to be seen as a major blow to the domestic manufacturers. I think the manufactures (certainly Sharp) have seen this - hence the semi-look alike phones they released.

Face it, 99% of everything (including phones) is crap. Long live Apple, the other 1%!

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post #68 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I can't speak for the Gap, but McDonalds alters it's menu vastly for different cultures.



But, Disneyland in Japan is still Disneyland, and Mcdonalds still offers the MacDonalds experience. The same with Apple and the iPhone.

And there will be different programs in different languages, with different isp's offering different services.
post #69 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

But, Disneyland in Japan is still Disneyland, and Mcdonalds still offers the MacDonalds experience. The same with Apple and the iPhone.

And there will be different programs in different languages, with different isp's offering different services.

Actually, it's more like "Makudonaludo"...

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post #70 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Actually, it's more like "Makudonaludo"...

Well, despite going out with a Japanese woman during college for several years, I still can't pronounce most Japanese words.\
post #71 of 164
Here's another post from someone living in Japan. It seems as though most of the posts I see from those living there, no matter where I read the posts, all say about the same thingJapanese phones are terrible. This one's from ARs:

Quote:
Hakime SEDDIK
"The 3G iphone look even worse than the original iphone. It an't offering anything better than other japan made phones.
"

You are kidding right?

I am living in Japan, and let me say you one thing. Japanese phones sucks in comparison to the iPhone. Yes they suck, you read it right. and why?

Well, their design suck, but more important the software running on those things is terrible flawed. I mean, did you ever use a japanese phone. Ok they look super modern compared to a cheap european or american phone but when you try to use them, it is a terrible experience compared to the iPhone.

Its was fine (the japanese phones were believed to be always on the technological leading) until Apple reinvent the phone industry, but now no way that you can say that japanese phones offer the same technology. Every phone maker in Japan was taken by storm when Apple revealed the iPhone, because they realized that their software sucks.

Surfing the net is a no go on japanese phones (they are stuck to some crippled browsers that are not able to surf 99% of internet), managing your mails is a pain, managing your media is a pain, everything is slow and simply difficult to use because their technology is outdated. And don't even try to run a third party applications, this is a mess of poor design. Developing apps for those phones? Don't think about it.... Enterprise support on those phones? Nil....

The only advantage of japanese phones over the original iPhone was that they are 3G. That's it, nothing else. But it is not even an advantage anymore.

The japanese phone market has been living a long time on his technological lead over other countries and somehow very few innovations came out besides the incredible amount of services provided by carriers and the improvements made in data transfer speeds. And also the market became a mess, with all the phones similar to each other offering very few technological differences between them. In other words the japanese phone market became boring. The iPhone changes all of that.

And by the way, recently several japanese makers have tried to propose new "generation" phones with touch screens in order to compete with the iPhones. So far the result is a disaster, they came up with bad rip off of the iPhone that are almost embarrassing. But well they are trying, they can't innovate so they copy......
June 18, 2008 @ 09:06PM
post #72 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistortedLoop View Post

A "spare" battery has the advantage of "change and go", not "wait for a charge and go", and is small enough to keep in your pocket where ever you are. Not true about a USB port/charger.

(...)

edit: someone above asked if anyone has ever seen someone carry a spare battery and change them in real life. YES. ME! With both my old Razr and my Treo 700P. It just depends on how much you use the device during the day, doesn't it?

How do you charge your multiple batteries? Back in the old days there used to be dedicated charging stations for replacement batteries, but these days are long gone...

Are you constantly changing them, having your device plugged-in all the time? How do you recharge them "on the road"?
post #73 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambrose Bierce View Post

It is interesting to fathom whether the iPhone is a truly universal device. Every country and culture has its own aesthetics and taste, even in a global economy. I suppose the Gap and MickeyD have proven it's possible to sell the same thing to everyone. Maybe the iPhone with it's different apps can crack the world wide market as well.

Actually, McDonald's adapts to each culture. You can get a shrimp cutlet burger here, a teriyaki burger, a McPork sandwich (pork is MUCH cheaper than beef in japan) etc. Of course fries are the same! But they are always making innovative sandwiches in the asian markets.
post #74 of 164
bad spelling/grammar aside I have to agree.

I think the iphone will be a sleeper hit in Japan.

Once the software and content starts to become localized and of decent quality, people will get onboard. A little later, things like plug-in battery packs and glittery case protectors will attract those on the fence.

The other carriers don't have the product delivery network of apple (apple tv, itunes, app store, software updater etc).

But where they will do well is with kanji input (its a bit clunky on ipod touch, the magnifer goes off the top of the screen sometimes.

Also the advertising machines will attack the iphones weaknesses, small res camera, no video, no tv, no wallet function, no front facing camera, tricky input, only 2 colors, not a clamshell or slider (candy bar isn't so popular), no dangling objects etc.

But it'll catch on...

(btw.. its hard to see some pop-up letters when typing european languages, umlauts etc-don't you think?..)
post #75 of 164
I'm in Osaka...
Quote:
The city is the capital of Osaka Prefecture. Often dubbed the second city of Japan, Osaka was historically the commercial capital of Japan, and to date the heart of Japan's second largest (and the world's ninth largest) metropolitan area of Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto, whose population is 17,220,000. Osaka is traditionally considered the "nation's kitchen" (天下の台所 tenka no daidokoro?) or the gourmet food capital of Japan.

Just thought I'd throw that in there since I love Osaka

The phones here are very functional and not expensive. If you are an early adopter they can be expensive just like anything else in the world. Wait a few weeks and the phones are commonly about $200 CAD. Even cheaper if you are a new subscriber. On the whole they are also not that sexy or slick but very functional.

List of features:

* Newer phones have 5.1MP cameras.
* 1SEG TV which works flawlessly and can be recorded onto SD card.
* Users here do carry second batteries and/or keep a spare charger at work.
* Full blown email with video and audio.
* Can pay for purchases with your phone.
* Misc other features such as games etc
* Water proof models. Useful in Asia.
* GPS


Incoming calls in Japan, including international calls, are free. This offsets many of the higher costs of having a phone in Japan.

Biggest factor in Japanese not purchasing an iPhone? The functionality of typing Japanese. This will not be convenient with a touch screen iPhone. I'd imagine this would be the same for most Asian text countries but because of China's population even a sliver of a market share there would be big. Many people who can type super fast in Japanese or Chinese use two thumbs and are very comfortable with the way input is implemented.

Some westerners are waiting for the iPhone but not me as I live by quick and easy communication in Japanese and the iPhone will not have this functionality. Plus the iPhone is pretty big. Not very 'jeans pocketable'.
post #76 of 164
Hey guys, I see I'm not the only one from the states living in Japan. One difference is I may have been here longer. Anyway, I can tell you that the single most important reason that Japanese are not apenuts about this new phone is that 3G technology was released in Japan 8 years ago! I moved here in 99' and it was release in 2001. From my personal perspective, Apple will have to make bigger leaps in technology in order to capture the Japanese audience. Kenwood released perhaps the first touch screen keitai (cell-phone) here in 2000. It was so cool looking and gained popularity, but soon many became frustrated trying to convert hiragana (1/3 used alphabets in Japanese) into kanji using a screen that often mis-read it's users inputs. I know Apple has done a lot to try and fix this problem, but I have to say that the current OS system will not work and I think it will bomb here as the large majority of the iPhones features have been prevalent in phones here for the past 6-8 years. Current phones here almost always include the following features.
-Digital television reception (wide-screen VGA)
-Video Conference Calling
-Instant skype-like text messaging
-Digital radio
-3MegaPixel~6.5MegaPixel cameras
-Cell Mail / Regular E-mail with no length limits & attachments
-Fully functioning web browsers (generally Opera) not all deal with Flash well...
-Music players (some only able to use their proprietary format which is probably Apples biggest plus at this point)
-3D games, PDF viewing, etc

I still may get an iPhone myself as I'm a MP3 maniac and don't want to charge my player and phone separately everyday, but as for the masses, I don't think the iPhone will have much appeal. Especially since they are going with a cheap looking plastic back cover. WTH is up with that?? I thought Apple announced that it will look to discontinue using plastics as they are bad for the environment? Huh. All in all I'd have to say the new iPhone is a big thumbs down. I will say that it seems like a pretty big improvement over that big, ugly brick Americans call a blackberry. Jesus what a joke that thing is. Looks like something designed in the 50's as being futuristic. At the very least, Apple has some idea of what can be manufactured using modern day materials and technology and may just pick up a few users here in Japan, albeit mostly American living in Japan! ;D
post #77 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by candlegravity View Post

Hey guys, I see I'm not the only one from the states living in Japan. One difference is I may have been here longer.

I believe there are westerners from many countries living in Japan. You also may have been here shorter.
post #78 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by candlegravity View Post

Hey guys, I see I'm not the only one from the states living in Japan. One difference is I may have been here longer. Anyway, I can tell you that the single most important reason that Japanese are not apenuts about this new phone is that 3G technology was released in Japan 8 years ago! I moved here in 99' and it was release in 2001. From my personal perspective, Apple will have to make bigger leaps in technology in order to capture the Japanese audience. Kenwood released perhaps the first touch screen keitai (cell-phone) here in 2000. It was so cool looking and gained popularity, but soon many became frustrated trying to convert hiragana (1/3 used alphabets in Japanese) into kanji using a screen that often mis-read it's users inputs. I know Apple has done a lot to try and fix this problem, but I have to say that the current OS system will not work and I think it will bomb here as the large majority of the iPhones features have been prevalent in phones here for the past 6-8 years. Current phones here almost always include the following features.
-Digital television reception (wide-screen VGA)
-Video Conference Calling
-Instant skype-like text messaging
-Digital radio
-3MegaPixel~6.5MegaPixel cameras
-Cell Mail / Regular E-mail with no length limits & attachments
-Fully functioning web browsers (generally Opera) not all deal with Flash well...
-Music players (some only able to use their proprietary format which is probably Apples biggest plus at this point)
-3D games, PDF viewing, etc

I still may get an iPhone myself as I'm a MP3 maniac and don't want to charge my player and phone separately everyday, but as for the masses, I don't think the iPhone will have much appeal. Especially since they are going with a cheap looking plastic back cover. WTH is up with that?? I thought Apple announced that it will look to discontinue using plastics as they are bad for the environment? Huh. All in all I'd have to say the new iPhone is a big thumbs down. I will say that it seems like a pretty big improvement over that big, ugly brick Americans call a blackberry. Jesus what a joke that thing is. Looks like something designed in the 50's as being futuristic. At the very least, Apple has some idea of what can be manufactured using modern day materials and technology and may just pick up a few users here in Japan, albeit mostly American living in Japan! ;D

I'm sorry but SOME phones (the high end EXPENSIVE ones) have 3+ MP cameras - most do not. Have a look at 800 series phones and below - all 2.0 MP. And as I said earlier, the pics from the high-end cam phones still suck.
post #79 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by success View Post

I believe there are westerners from many countries living in Japan. You also may have been here shorter.

I'm pushing 20 years in Japan...

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #80 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by satchmo View Post

The iPhone is built solid and making a user replaceable battery that doesn't fall out is not rocket science.

Yup. On the other hand, my entry-level Nokia's battery is so hard to take out, it's not worth having a spare battery (or for that matter, getting a temp SIM card when traveling overseas). So it technically has a user-replaceable battery but for practical purposes, it's not.

I see Nokia is still in business ...

Philip Machanick creator of Opinionations and Green Grahamstown
Department of Computer Science, Rhodes University, South Africa

Reply

Philip Machanick creator of Opinionations and Green Grahamstown
Department of Computer Science, Rhodes University, South Africa

Reply
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