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iTunes Store tops 5B songs sold, serving up 50,000 movies per day - Page 2

post #41 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

30 minute shows are about 22 minutes long. They tend to have 6 to 8 episodes per disk.

One hour shows are about 42 minutes long. They tend to have 3 to 4 episodes per disk.

Ah true... 30 minute shows are generally sit-coms, which I despise and never watch.. So obviously, I've never rented a sit-com disc. Thanks for correcting.
post #42 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solsun View Post

Firstly, All of your Apple devices will play iTunes media..

Secondly, your Blu-Ray discs have just as much DRM and are more limited than iTunes content as they won't play on anything other than your PS3 or another Blu-Ray player.

I do understand what you mean by the quality isn't there yet with iTunes HD, but it is still very good for a rental.

That is one way of looking at it. A movie on Blu-ray disc will play on any BD player - mine, my friends, my brother's. HD movies only work in Appletv only from iTunes and cannot be taken to another Appletv. BD player will also play DVD's which means a much more vast library. Standard def movies can be purchased on iTunes but the titles are much more limited. So yes, more limited.
post #43 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

That is one way of looking at it. A movie on Blu-ray disc will play on any BD player - mine, my friends, my brother's. HD movies only work in Appletv only from iTunes and cannot be taken to another Appletv. BD player will also play DVD's which means a much more vast library. Standard def movies can be purchased on iTunes but the titles are much more limited. So yes, more limited.

Blu-Ray isn't as tradeable as DVD yet, but I think that's a concern too. I can loan DVDs with ease. That's not so much of a concern with buying a missed episode.
post #44 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solsun View Post

Actually, there is nothing contradictory in my statement..

Yes, iTunes media has DRM, but you have options, you can transfer that media from your computer (Mac or PC,) as well as an iPod, iPhone or Apple TV.. So you do have the option of portability and taking that content with you as well as watching it on the big screen at home.

Blu-Ray content also has DRM but it is more "limited" in that there is no portability offered. Sure, you can choose to buy a player from Sony, Pioneer or other, but they are essentially all the same type of device, a Blu-Ray player.. Most people don't buy multiple Blu-Ray players for different needs, but they do buy multiple home and portable devices for different purposes. You can't rip, burn or take Blu-Ray content with you on ANY brand music player or phone.

I think the fair comparison for Blu-ray content would be HD movies from iTunes which cannot be transferred from the Appletv.
post #45 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Blu-Ray isn't as tradeable as DVD yet, but I think that's a concern too. I can loan DVDs with ease. That's not so much of a concern with buying a missed episode.

I borrow and loan movies to friends and family. It brings down the cost of movies quite a bit. I think buying a missed episode is one of the great things about iTunes.
post #46 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

How many of those 22k are for rent?

Less than 2000, probably no way to know for sure how many. The point is that Netflix doesn't have more titles available, as some people assumed.
post #47 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

That is one way of looking at it. A movie on Blu-ray disc will play on any BD player - mine, my friends, my brother's. HD movies only work in Appletv only from iTunes and cannot be taken to another Appletv. BD player will also play DVD's which means a much more vast library. Standard def movies can be purchased on iTunes but the titles are much more limited. So yes, more limited.


This is just an opinion... But I personally think that most people would rather have the ability to share content between their own devices than being able to let their brother borrow it.. I mean, if brother really wants to watch a movie, let him pony up the $4 to rent it himself..
post #48 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post

Less than 2000, probably no way to know for sure how many. The point is that Netflix doesn't have more titles available, as some people assumed.

Jump over to the iTunes Store under Movies. There is a link for Rentals. Just add up the number per page, multiply the number of pages minus 1, and then add the number of rentals on the last page.

(I'd do it but I have no access to iTunes right now)
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post #49 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

I think the fair comparison for Blu-ray content would be HD movies from iTunes which cannot be transferred from the Appletv.

True, although, the HD restriction is studio imposed, not Apple.. Every DRM has different limitations, I still think that because Apple is so dominant with iTunes and portable devices, that even with limitations, it is still the most flexible and offers the most options as far as transferring and portability.. Blu-Ray does not offer any similar options.
post #50 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Jump over to the iTunes Store under Movies. There is a link for Rentals. Just add up the number per page, multiply the number of pages minus 1, and then add the number of rentals on the last page.

(I'd do it but I have no access to iTunes right now)

AppleTvJunkie keeps a running tally of the iTunes HD content. Currently there are 387 HD movie titles available for rent and purchase. SD content is somewhere around 2000 titles..

http://www.appletvjunkie.com/
post #51 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post

Less than 2000, probably no way to know for sure how many. The point is that Netflix doesn't have more titles available, as some people assumed.

I thought it was pretty clear that Netflix had more to rent than Apple did have to rent. Apple having more but it being mostly purchased, is a different game and different market in my opinion. The selection each has appears to largely complement each other as well.
post #52 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solsun View Post

This is just an opinion... But I personally think that most people would rather have the ability to share content between their own devices than being able to let their brother borrow it.. I mean, if brother really wants to watch a movie, let him pony up the $4 to rent it himself..

If I were to limit myself from lending and borrowing, that would make BD more limiting. Thank goodness I do not have to do that.
post #53 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post

Interesting to finally see a number on apple's videos.

So they offer 22k titles, compared with the 10k for Netflix downloads. So much for the assumed Netflix advantage there.

And is a pace of 18 million movie downloads per year so bad? Seems decent for an industry in its infancy and likely to grow pretty quickly over the next few years.

Isn't the most important factor that apple is the number one video/movie download site (by far), not whether the raw numbers seem big enough? As long as Apple is on top and growing, I don't see any reason for concern. Like studios are going to abandon the most successful seller in favor of smaller ones? No way.

Apple's biggest hurdle is that they are SO successful, studios are afraid of giving them too much content and them monopolizing the market.

2.2k titles. Not 22k titles.

The rest are Tv shows.
post #54 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbene12 View Post

Mel,

Guess i wont bother putting my 2 cents up anymore. Your opinion = truth , unless that argument also "has no credence"

When your opinion is wrong, it's wrong. That's not my fault.

If you take facts into account, you will see it's wrong. That, and a little logic.

As someone said, I'm gruff and opinionated. So, prove me wrong. Sometimes it happens.
post #55 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

That is one way of looking at it. A movie on Blu-ray disc will play on any BD player - mine, my friends, my brother's. HD movies only work in Appletv only from iTunes and cannot be taken to another Appletv. BD player will also play DVD's which means a much more vast library. Standard def movies can be purchased on iTunes but the titles are much more limited. So yes, more limited.

Is this my cue to state how an AppleTV with built-in blu-ray drive would be nirvana?

I really don't think it would have a huge impact on iTunes revenue. Personally, I will never purchase a movie from iTunes. If I want to own something, I will buy the disc for it's better quality and not having to have a bank of hard drives to store downloaded movies. But for rentals, even if I had a blu-ray drive, I'd still use iTunes. Even the SD content has better overall picture quality than cable's HD channels. And you can't beat the convenience. I see them as complimentary more than competitors.

Just like the PlayStation was the Trojan horse to get blu-ray drives into homes and help defeat HD-DVD, a blu-ray drive would be the Trojan horse to get more AppleTV units into homes. Once they get critical mass with iTunes content, people will just start using iTunes more and more and the optical drive would be relegated to just playing the discs you already own. (Just think how big of a flop the iPod would have been if from day one the only way to get music on it was to buy it from Apple instead of also being able to listen to the music you already had on CD!)
post #56 of 80
The content industry needs to quit dicking around and release ALL NEW AND CATALOG TITLES for digital rental NOW! And that means all the HD titles available as well. WTF is with this crapshoot of titles available on iTunes or Amazon/Tivo ? Why isn't every single title I can rent from blockbuster or netflix available for download? I'm so sick of the arrogance and sheer incompetence of hollywood. Why are they holding everything hostage? Is this the doing of big-box stores AKA WALMART and rental stores??

on a side note, I'm sure HD digital content delivery will be the norm sometime in the 22nd century when more than 5% of the population of the USA has access to fiber-to-the-home internet connections -- something which will NOT happen from market forces, and needs to be encouraged by the state with subsidies, tax incentives, etc, just as the laying of phone lines was a hundred years ago.
post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

30 minute shows are about 22 minutes long. They tend to have 6 to 8 episodes per disk.

One hour shows are about 42 minutes long. They tend to have 3 to 4 episodes per disk.

somethings wrong there!

a one hour show is one hour long, a 45 min show is 45 mins.

its only the verbose clutter of adverts that pump up the time it takes to watch a particular show.

I'm in the UK and cant stand adverts, thanks to the BBCs 4 channels (no adverts) I'm well served with pretty good broadcasting.

Admittedly we seem to be pretty spoiled here, a 45 min drama show can run for 42 mins one week if the script was a bit short, or 48 mins the next week if the script was a bit long. brilliant IMO. Long may it continue.

50,000 a DAY! thats outstanding at this point in the game, just a slight doubt over THAT figure given that the 22,000 / 2000 figure has been chopped and changed.

I'm sure (hope) that number will increase, there seems to be no stopping Apple at this point, quite the turn around.
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post #58 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Slocombe View Post

somethings wrong there!

Nothing is wrong with my assessment. But I agree that it's annoying to have your show interrupted with commercials. If you watch a US show without commercials you still know when they would have come and gone as they done in acts between the commercial interruptions. I am not a fan of them so i tend to DL later and watch, even when I'm available to watch them on TV when they air.

Our commercials are nearly a 1/3 of the shows overall length. It's horrible, but it does mean that US television can hire more writers, more producers, have better sets, etc. because the moeny is there to support it. For example, The Office UK was great but there are only 6 episodes per the two seasons/series and 2 parter Xmas special. That is horrible! The US version has become so much better than the UK version ever was because they have the finances to do so.
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post #59 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solsun View Post

Actually, there is nothing contradictory in my statement..

Yes, iTunes media has DRM, but you have options, you can transfer that media from your computer (Mac or PC,) as well as an iPod, iPhone or Apple TV.. So you do have the option of portability and taking that content with you as well as watching it on the big screen at home.

Blu-Ray content also has DRM but it is more "limited" in that there is no portability offered. Sure, you can choose to buy a player from Sony, Pioneer or other, but they are essentially all the same type of device, a Blu-Ray player.. Most people don't buy multiple Blu-Ray players for different needs, but they do buy multiple home and portable devices for different purposes. You can't rip, burn or take Blu-Ray content with you on ANY brand music player or phone.

I think you're missing the point. I don't like nor want to be locked into buying hardware from only one vendor. With iTunes DRM, my only options are from Apple. If media player X has features that the iPod lacks, with a computer full of iTunes DRM'ed tracks I'd be of luck.

And you sort of killed your own argument in the second paragraph. Blu-Ray isn't designed to be portable media. It's prime use is at a stationary location enjoyed on a large TV; Watching a Blu-Ray movie on an iPod's tiny screen would sort of kill the point. I don't desire or expect to be able to play Blu-Ray media on a portable player (but they'll probably be portable players in a few years time regardless). And again, I can get a Blu-Ray player from multiple vendors. Which means I can pick the features and price point that I want. I'm not limited to what one manufacturer deems worthy to give me.
post #60 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

So, prove me wrong. Sometimes it happens.

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post #61 of 80
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Originally Posted by quinney View Post

Someone has kidnapped melgross and taken over his AI identity.
Alert the media and law enforcement

Insidious alien invasion.
post #62 of 80
I wonder what percentage of those rentals are the weekly (Friday - Monday) 99¢ iTunes teaser movies?

That's been the bulk of my iTunes rentals since I have a NetFlix subscription and typically watch 10+ (Blu-ray if available) movies/month. Based on that level of viewing, NetFlix remains cheaper, plus, I like the subtitles and extras (cut scenes/director comments/etc) which are on the DVDs but not available when rented from iTunes.

Still, iTunes is a great resource for impulse rentals and I've used it a few times.

I haven't bought a single iTunes movie since they can't be archived off my TV. Always the fear that I might have to do a hard reset and lose all the purchased movies.
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Rentals AND purchases. The average could be higher, perhaps $6 to $8.

Whatever the market is doing today so far (I haven't checked my realtime account yet) Apple's stock should be rising from this news, which shows three very good things.

One is the expanded music library of over 8 million songs.

Two is the sale of over 5 billion songs, which shows, as I've been saying for years now, that most consumers couldn't care less about DRM and quality issues. This makes the DRM hating geeks come out of the woodwork, but it's true, most consumers don't give a sh*t about DRM.

And three is the really good news about movie purchases and rentals. Even though Apple has many fewer movies than their main competitors, their new pricing and renting schedules are proving to be palatable to consumers, as I also said it would, and leading to industry leading business. Variable pricing is not the bugaboo that some seem to think it is. Consumers agree that different things have different values, and they don't mind paying more for something they value more.

All your points are spot-on. Best post of this thread.

So much noise here.......
post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

All your points are spot-on. Best post of this thread.

So much noise here.......

Thanks.

A lot of people aren't thinking it all the way through.
post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Two is the sale of over 5 billion songs, which shows, as I've been saying for years now, that most consumers couldn't care less about DRM and quality issues. This makes the DRM hating geeks come out of the woodwork, but it's true, most consumers don't give a sh*t about DRM.

I've said it before, but how many of those 5 billion songs are the 3 or more free songs that Apple "sells" every week? I think I remember Apple stating there are 50 million iTunes Store accounts, so if they each average out to downloading 1 of the free songs each week, they account for over a quarter billion songs each year. That would quickly deflate the 5 billion figure.

Likewise, I still take issue with how sales are calculated by translating 12 digital tracks into an album for comparison to physical sales. It seems like a lot of new albums include more than 12 tracks especially with the preorder bonus tracks that Apple uses to get users to buy the full album. I purchased Alanis Morissette's new album from iTunes only because I wanted the bonus track only iTunes offered and the code to early order concert tickets (which I still haven't received). That album had 17 tracks on it, so Apple gets counted as selling about 1 1/2 albums from my sole purchase.
post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

I've said it before, but how many of those 5 billion songs are the 3 or more free songs that Apple "sells" every week? I think I remember Apple stating there are 50 million iTunes Store accounts, so if they each average out to downloading 1 of the free songs each week, they account for over a quarter billion songs each year. That would quickly deflate the 5 billion figure.

Likewise, I still take issue with how sales are calculated by translating 12 digital tracks into an album for comparison to physical sales. It seems like a lot of new albums include more than 12 tracks especially with the preorder bonus tracks that Apple uses to get users to buy the full album. I purchased Alanis Morissette's new album from iTunes only because I wanted the bonus track only iTunes offered and the code to early order concert tickets (which I still haven't received). That album had 17 tracks on it, so Apple gets counted as selling about 1 1/2 albums from my sole purchase.

You're right. Apple has probably only sold 5 or 6 songs.

Good God! iTunes' music and video store is an incredible phenomenon, and a huge success, and you are wasting your time deconstructing press releases to find where they have sexed up their numbers? Everybody puts the best face legally possible on their results.
post #67 of 80
Wouldn't the recent decision by many ISPs to charge per gig start making a dent in downloads the more people that are affected by it? It is not so much of an issue in Europe (where legal iTunes shows are thin on the ground), but here in the South Pacific bandwidth costs. There are certainly no plans for some sort of FIOS here either.. one wonders if there are plans for an iTunes movie service, but that is another thread.
It might only add an extra $1.30 or whatever depending on ISP, but that might be enough to tip the odds in favour of your average American either travelling to the store or getting the entertainment through more nefarious means..

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post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

A lot of people aren't thinking it all the way through.

In my defense, I chose $4 to low-ball the estimate for the sake of the argument. But you had a good post; I will try to be more clear in the future.
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post #69 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Any word on NBC's outside attempts with NBC.com, Hulu, Amazon and Zune Marketplace or whatever other distribution devices NBC has chosen? I wonder if the execs at NBC are still trying to figure a way to come back to iTunes while saving face or if they feel they are justly compensated through the ad supported distribution means they currently support with their programming.

Not to diminish any of NBC's shows but none of them ever caught my fancy so I never viewed them or bought them while on iTunes and I DEFINITELY did not go looking for any of their shows elsewhere. I am curious to know, those that loved NBC's programs such as, The Office, Scrubs, 30 Rock or whatever, when the content dried up at iTunes did any of you venture to alternate sites to find the NBC content and if you did back then, are you still today?!

Just curious...

Yes, I venture to bittorrent because it is the only method that will allow me to play NBC shows on my iPod touch. i don't usually download illegally, but NBC has left me with no other alternative.

NBC has gotta be on crack to ignore the world's largest music retailer, which may soon be the world's largest digital movie retailer. That's like NBC not selling their DVDs at WalMart.

When will media companies realize that DRM restrictions HURT their business? My VHS tapes don't have DRM, and when I record shows on VHS there is no broadcast flag preventing me from doing so, so why do media companies feel that new digital media has to have more restrictions than analog media? Do they really think that their DRM schemes, broadcast flags, and aggressive lawsuits against their own customers are really going to stop people from being able to pirate the shows and put them on the internet?

Media companies: piracy is unstoppable as long as you make it more convenient to download illegally. If media companies made it easy to access their content on a variety of platforms and not just the Boob Toob or on a standard computer, people would have no incentive to bother with piracy given the risk.
post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostkiwi View Post

Wouldn't the recent decision by many ISPs to charge per gig start making a dent in downloads the more people that are affected by it? It is not so much of an issue in Europe (where legal iTunes shows are thin on the ground), but here in the South Pacific bandwidth costs. There are certainly no plans for some sort of FIOS here either.. one wonders if there are plans for an iTunes movie service, but that is another thread.
It might only add an extra $1.30 or whatever depending on ISP, but that might be enough to tip the odds in favour of your average American either travelling to the store or getting the entertainment through more nefarious means..

i like the idea of charging per GB because it fairly charges people who are using the network more than a grandma or grandpa who check their email once a week. namely, bittorrent users who seed 24/7. if the ISPs get the same flat rate from everyone, they have to raise that rate to cope with filesharers and heavy downloaders and it's not fair to people who don't suck up the bandwidth.

However, I don't think that rates I'm seeing ISPs introduce are very fair, I think they are a bit steep. Also, there comes an issue of how hard/easy it is to check your monthly bandwidth allowance, which I'm sure you can do on these companies web sites or account page, but it would be convenient if there was some solution that told you as you were browsing (maybe a FF extension?)

Or what about programs that come on your computer that "phone home" or use the network without the user being aware? usually that's pretty light usage, but programs like Microsoft Windows and Office and all those check for updates, and send information to Microsoft from time to time, and most users don't know about it, but it would increase their bandwidth consumption.
post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

I've said it before, but how many of those 5 billion songs are the 3 or more free songs that Apple "sells" every week? I think I remember Apple stating there are 50 million iTunes Store accounts, so if they each average out to downloading 1 of the free songs each week, they account for over a quarter billion songs each year. That would quickly deflate the 5 billion figure.

Likewise, I still take issue with how sales are calculated by translating 12 digital tracks into an album for comparison to physical sales. It seems like a lot of new albums include more than 12 tracks especially with the preorder bonus tracks that Apple uses to get users to buy the full album. I purchased Alanis Morissette's new album from iTunes only because I wanted the bonus track only iTunes offered and the code to early order concert tickets (which I still haven't received). That album had 17 tracks on it, so Apple gets counted as selling about 1 1/2 albums from my sole purchase.

Sold songs are songs that are paid for, not given away. Even if they were, they would account for what, 100 million? That would be a drop in the bucket. It's not likely that more that a very small fraction of people download the free songs. Why would someone download songs they weren't interested in? The answer is that most people wouldn't. And that still isn't sold songs.

If Apple said that the total was "downloaded" songs, that would be different. but that's not what they're saying. It's what you are saying.

I also don't get what you are saying about your purchasing Alanis's album. Did you, or did you not purchase the album? If you did, then you purchased however many tracks that were on the album.

As brick and mortar companies offer specials, and music companies give bonus tracks on CD's as well, what you are saying has no relevance. Apple isn't doing anything that anyone else isn't doing, and you must compare it that way. You don't get to pick and choose what you think should count.
post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by akhomerun View Post

Yes, I venture to bittorrent because it is the only method that will allow me to play NBC shows on my iPod touch. i don't usually download illegally, but NBC has left me with no other alternative.

NBC has gotta be on crack to ignore the world's largest music retailer, which may soon be the world's largest digital movie retailer. That's like NBC not selling their DVDs at WalMart.

When will media companies realize that DRM restrictions HURT their business? My VHS tapes don't have DRM, and when I record shows on VHS there is no broadcast flag preventing me from doing so, so why do media companies feel that new digital media has to have more restrictions than analog media? Do they really think that their DRM schemes, broadcast flags, and aggressive lawsuits against their own customers are really going to stop people from being able to pirate the shows and put them on the internet?

Media companies: piracy is unstoppable as long as you make it more convenient to download illegally. If media companies made it easy to access their content on a variety of platforms and not just the Boob Toob or on a standard computer, people would have no incentive to bother with piracy given the risk.

Actually, you DO have another alternative. The alternative is to not watch the shows on your iPod. Pretty simple. Why do people think that because they want something that isn't offered, they have the right to just take it?
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Sold songs are songs that are paid for, not given away. Even if they were, they would account for what, 100 million? That would be a drop in the bucket. It's not likely that more that a very small fraction of people download the free songs. Why would someone download songs they weren't interested in? The answer is that most people wouldn't. And that still isn't sold songs.

Well, because they're free. People have nothing to lose by downloading them and giving them a try. If they don't like them, they can easily and without concern delete them. I used to religiously fire up iTunes and download all 3 new songs. I have several hundred songs on my computer acquired that way. And they could account for up to 150 million per week if every one of the 50 million iTunes accounts downloaded all 3 one week. Multiple that by 52 weeksa and you end up with over a quarter billion songs. That would hardly be considered an unsubstantial portion of the 5 billion purchases Apple states.

Quote:
If Apple said that the total was "downloaded" songs, that would be different. but that's not what they're saying. It's what you are saying.

Have you downloaded any of the free tracks? If so, go look at your iTunes account. As far as I can tell, those tracks are being counted as purchases in the system. The fact that the cost is $0.00 doesn't discount the fact that the iTunes Store is listing them as purchases.

I was asking the question as to how is Apple counting the free songs. Has Apple ever said they AREN'T counting the free songs as purchases? If they haven't, then you have no more knowledge of whether they are or not included in the 5 billion total. IF they are being counted, it could greatly skew sales figures in iTunes favor.

Quote:
I also don't get what you are saying about your purchasing Alanis's album. Did you, or did you not purchase the album? If you did, then you purchased however many tracks that were on the album.

If I purchased that album at a store, it counts as one album. With the fact that it included 17 tracks, that iTunes purchase gets counted as 1.4 albums for iTunes. Which means a brick and mortar store has to sell 40% more of that album to equal iTunes artificial album count. A more extreme example would be the latest Janet Jackson album with its 22 tracks (even though one is all of 10 seconds in length). That equates to 1.8 albums, meaning the local Best Buy has to sell 80% more than iTUnes.

Quote:
As brick and mortar companies offer specials, and music companies give bonus tracks on CD's as well, what you are saying has no relevance. Apple isn't doing anything that anyone else isn't doing, and you must compare it that way. You don't get to pick and choose what you think should count.

The point is that the more tracks iTunes sells, the higher their album sales look. Bonus tracks for a brick and mortar store may help entice people to buy it from them, but they don't artificially inflate sales numbers like they do for the iTunes Store. If Target's version has 12 regular tracks and 12 extra tracks, it STILL only counts as one album. On iTunes, that would get counted as 2 albums. Do you see my point?
post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

They were about 1.5 months short of selling 5B is 5 years.

At the current rate of 50K movies per day they will sell 18.25M per year. At $4 per movie rental (which I assume is the most common) that is $73M per year in revenue.

Holy cow bells! However, in the article, it says that 50,000 movies are rented and purchased everyday.
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post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobertoq View Post

Holy cow bells! However, in the article, it says that 50,000 movies are rented and purchased everyday.

I was using a low ball estimate of what is probably the most common sale. I also didn't factor in any growth over the next 12 months, which should easily get over 100K per day (again, at the low end) this time next year.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #76 of 80
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Originally Posted by melgross View Post

As someone said, I'm gruff and opinionated.



Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post


Have you downloaded any of the free tracks? If so, go look at your iTunes account. As far as I can tell, those tracks are being counted as purchases in the system. The fact that the cost is $0.00 doesn't discount the fact that the iTunes Store is listing them as purchases.

Unless you have evidence that Apple is counting sings that they give away as songs that are purchased, in their numbers, you can't say anything about that. You are the one making that assertion, so you have to show some proof of it. In my quarterly reports Apple often mentions purchases of music. I'm confident that it's exactly what they mean.

Quote:
I was asking the question as to how is Apple counting the free songs. Has Apple ever said they AREN'T counting the free songs as purchases? If they haven't, then you have no more knowledge of whether they are or not included in the 5 billion total. IF they are being counted, it could greatly skew sales figures in iTunes favor.

Thy don't have to state a negative, only a positive., If they were counting them, then they should state that.

In their financials, when they mention these numbers, they must state numbers that reflect income.

Quote:
If I purchased that album at a store, it counts as one album. With the fact that it included 17 tracks, that iTunes purchase gets counted as 1.4 albums for iTunes. Which means a brick and mortar store has to sell 40% more of that album to equal iTunes artificial album count. A more extreme example would be the latest Janet Jackson album with its 22 tracks (even though one is all of 10 seconds in length). That equates to 1.8 albums, meaning the local Best Buy has to sell 80% more than iTUnes.

That's only sort of true. While it is true that we rarely see singles being sold anymore, they used to comprise a very large portion of music sales before the digital era. What's happening at Apple, and other download sites, it that music sales are going back to that early era of the "45". So counting songs is correct. The music companies are the ones who are so concerned about albums. no one else is.

So, sales are termed as "songs". The songs counts used for the music industry in calculating Apple's place. That makes sense, as few people buy albums from iTunes in comparison to song buyers (about one third), and this bothers the music industry. They want to see music sold in chunks.

Quote:
The point is that the more tracks iTunes sells, the higher their album sales look. Bonus tracks for a brick and mortar store may help entice people to buy it from them, but they don't artificially inflate sales numbers like they do for the iTunes Store. If Target's version has 12 regular tracks and 12 extra tracks, it STILL only counts as one album. On iTunes, that would get counted as 2 albums. Do you see my point?

Except that Apple isn't saying that they sold some number of albums, they are counting by the song, so why do you keep bringing it up? You're the one counting by the album.
post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbene12 View Post

Mel,

Guess i wont bother putting my 2 cents up anymore. Your opinion = truth , unless that argument also "has no credence"

Put up your 2 cents, but don't expect any change back.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Put up your 2 cents, but don't expect any change back.

You do realize this thread is five months old, right?
post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Put up your 2 cents, but don't expect any change back.

I like to see people think things out. All too often, people don't.

They take, or see, a small slice of what is happening, and assume that it's everything that is, or will be. That's where their arguments get into trouble.

I remember way back when Apple first came out with Quicktime.

It was 160 x 120 16 bit video at 15 fps, with 8 bit mono.

People were laughing at it in the industry. I wrote some (paid) pieces in some industry publications as to why it would take over video, editing and other areas. But people really dumped on me. They thought I was nuts for even suggesting such a wild thing.

Guess what?

The same thing is true for a number of other arguments. We have to look to the future to see whether things will be important, not what happens upon release. Too bad, some people can't seem to look ahead.
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