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First shots of Mac OS X Snow Leopard show desktop web apps - Page 2

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by WidnowsGuy View Post

I'm a Mac Guy from years back. I had to switch to Windows to do Business in the corporate world.

This ALL JUST SEEMS A LITTLE TO FAMILIAR TO VISTA. THE ALL SAVING UPGRADE.

WE'RE STILL WAITING FOR WINDOWS X.X TO FIX IT BUT I'M STILL ON XP.

You sound like a Windows guy!

SL will be not a saving upgrade, but an entirely new architecture upgrade allowing the company a new direction rather than trying to fix an old tired architecture (like Windows).

The upgrade price will be more than justifiable, and i do hope Apple does not give in with support for G5s. I will miss my G5, but that will last until the wrapping is off the SL OS.

I applaud Apple for this move and will show my vote at the register (which they don't have \)
post #42 of 53
For christ's sake people, should lighten up!

It's not so bad here, but on a lot of other website people ar whining about SL to no end.

1) We don't know how much Apple will charge for Snow Leopard, IF ANYTHING.

2) If the under the hood changes are really as big as they appear to be, they'd just have to add an updated UIand then they might've just called this OS11 and nobody would whine but would just be super excited.

3) If they will charge and you don't like the price, DON'T BUY, it's not like your Leopard machine will suddenly stop working. Most apps still work fine on 10.4 now, a lot even still work on 10.3. If you feel you're missing out on something with 10.6, then I guess IT IS worth the upgrade price...
post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by CREB View Post

I have to say that I am already anxious for Snow Leopard. The new Safari icon is brilliant.

Me too. The icing would be if it were free.

With SproutCore, SquirrelFish, and Safari 4.0 it appears Apple is gunning for ASP.NET and Java's turf. Flash will just get lost in the mix-up.
post #44 of 53
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
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Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
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post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I have no idea what part sounds like Vista. Leopard is faster than Tiger is faster than Panther et cetera. Vista added a plethora of spec sheet features to compete with OS X Tiger, but still had legacy code making up the foundation of VIsta, while Snow Leopard is trying to reduce legacy code so modern computers can perform better. I've also not read about mass migration back to XO from Vista on newly purchased machines.


PS: I wish I had seen your "Vista Osx" and "Vista 0sx" posts before I replied as you are coming off as a troll.

I would agree, that assessment is tough to argue against. I usually mentally dock points for posts where caps lock is abused, especially for whole sentences or more.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by kim kap sol View Post

Oh shiii...SEKRIT APIS. 64-bit Carbon shouldn't exist. Yet the Finder can be launched in 32-bit mode? NO! This is utter bullshit.

This is either:

a) Fake
b) A bug that shows 32-bit mode even though the Finder actually is running in 32-bit mode (yet Activity Monitor says it's running in 64-bit mode)
c) Secret APIs that nobody has access to except Apple
d) a Cocoa Finder (which suspiciously looks exactly like the Carbon Leopard Finder)

I know Apple...I know the Finder team is composed of retarded monkeys...this isn't a Cocoa Finder, the Finder team isn't competent enough to produce a Cocoa Finder in such little time that looks and feels like the current Finder (and why would they copy something when they have a chance to start with a clean slate) so we can safely rule d out. The screenshot is most likely not fake...so it's either b or c. Which is it? Is Apple really flexing their 64-bit Carbon APIs in front of Adobe and MS's faces or has Apple actually written an exact replica of the Carbon Finder in Cocoa? Either answer would disappoint me to no end.

I go with "d". I think you may find that Apple has been "slowly" working away to change all their apps. to Cocoa. I'm would think that Snow Leopard would be the OS that showcases what can be done with Cocoa. After all, it is a bit silly to tell all of your developers to develop in Cocoa when half of your own apps. are still in Carbon.

There again, I could be very wrong.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

Me too. The icing would be if it were free.

By the time it's released, SL will cost about the same as a tank of gas in the USA. And it will last a lot longer and be more fun to use, since by then the only place you can afford to drive is to work. YMMV.
post #48 of 53
It's a Cocoa Finder that replaces the pre-existing behavior and API calls of the Carbon Finder.

You meet those minimum requirements while working in a smaller team a redesign for Cocoa of Finder.

There are multiple teams that work and address past, present and future business clients.
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorre View Post

For christ's sake people, should lighten up!

It's not so bad here, but on a lot of other website people ar whining about SL to no end.

1) We don't know how much Apple will charge for Snow Leopard, IF ANYTHING.

i think that it is safe to say that it will be the same $129 as the last few times. that seems to be the standard price.

what we don't know is what we'll get for that price. the release was guessed at a year from now. and while the focus is performance and trimming the fat (according to Steve and gang) that doesn't mean that that is all they are going to do. if someone has a brilliant idea between now and then that will add value to the package, it's not likely to be offhandedly disregarded because they aren't going to add any features at all no matter what.

that said, a major overhaul is not nothing. think of it like flipping a house. yes you can just window dress it and make it look pretty but tearing down the walls and replacing poor insulation, or fixing poorly done wiring or old pipes, those things add real value. you don't see the value until you get the bills for less electricity used etc but it is there.

2) If the under the hood changes are really as big as they appear to be, they'd just have to add an updated UIand then they might've just called this OS11 and nobody would whine but would just be super excited.

3) If they will charge and you don't like the price, DON'T BUY, it's not like your Leopard machine will suddenly stop working. Most apps still work fine on 10.4 now, a lot even still work on 10.3. If you feel you're missing out on something with 10.6, then I guess IT IS worth the upgrade price...[/QUOTE]
post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

i think that it is safe to say that it will be the same $129 as the last few times. that seems to be the standard price.

I'm not so sure it's safe to say that. The last few times, for $129, we received "new features"...so you could just as easily say it's the standard price for a major upgrade. Remember 10.1? It was a free upgrade for those who purchased 10.0 and didn't offer "new features", just performance upgrades.

I'm really not sure why the concern over the price is such a big freaking deal. Let's bitch about it when Apple actually announces the price.
post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by k squared View Post

I'm not so sure it's safe to say that. The last few times, for $129, we received "new features"...so you could just as easily say it's the standard price for a major upgrade. Remember 10.1? It was a free upgrade for those who purchased 10.0 and didn't offer "new features", just performance upgrades.

I'm really not sure why the concern over the price is such a big freaking deal. Let's bitch about it when Apple actually announces the price.

If I recall correctly 10,0 to 10.1 added much needed stability to OS X. While I agree that we shouldn't be concerned with the pricing until it's announced I do think it will be the regular upgrade price as it appears there is a lot going into tit, even if the "no new features" is just a reference to bells and whistles most users consider.
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post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If I recall correctly 10,0 to 10.1 added much needed stability to OS X.

I don't remember about stability but there definitely was some more speed. Or, to say this better, the OS was less glacial. But I wonder if the debug code is still around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

While I agree that we shouldn't be concerned with the pricing until it's announced I do think it will be the regular upgrade price as it appears there is a lot going into tit...

I think so too. The work under way seems really heavy but Apple still has to find the means to communicate to the average consumer having already a Mac why Snow Leopard is best. No question of course for new customers since all new Macs will have it.
post #53 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlake View Post

Frankly, I don't see an OS 11 happening for decades. "OS X" is now the brand name, not "Mac OS." In my mind, the 10.x.x designation only exists to make the OS X brand name make more sense.

I don't see why you would call something like that. You're already posting in a thread whose topic is an operating system with mainly core revamping that no one predicted three months prior to unveiling.

Apple's internal roadmap for their overarching business horizons is what fanatics and Wall Street alike never have any clue about.

This is why tracking AAPL is essentially the best soap opera I've ever seen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PB View Post

I don't remember about stability but there definitely was some more speed. Or, to say this better, the OS was less glacial. But I wonder if the debug code is still around.
I think so too. The work under way seems really heavy but Apple still has to find the means to communicate to the average consumer having already a Mac why Snow Leopard is best. No question of course for new customers since all new Macs will have it.

If the result of 10.6 development is serious performance bumps, with substantial percentage increases and numbers that would be impressive on their own Keynote slide, then it's a no-brainer to advocate. Everyone likes speed. And [fundamentally] better utilization of the hardware they already own.

edit: except the poor souls with Mac Mini Solos
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