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First iPhone 3G reviews via the WSJ, USA Today and NY Times - Page 2

post #41 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by w1n78 View Post

"While iPhone Software v2.0 allows for both personal and Exchange email accounts to function simultaneously, synching Exchange calendars and contacts will erase any personal calendars and contacts."

well, that sucks \

It sucks so bad that I've decided to not get one now... How hard could it be to separate address book and calendars? The top reason for me to get an iPhone is to go to one device, but if I can't have my personal calendars, I'll stick with my blackberry (where the battery lasts, I get 3G performance, and I can tether to my laptop).

Ken
post #42 of 88
[QUOTE=thomasfxlt;1275264]

As far as ATT's network is concerned, better than most. QUOTE]

?? Then why are they listed among the worst with Consumer Reports?
post #43 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Are you still paying the minimum $45 a month for your web data plan?

And what does a web data plan have to do with bad reception on calls?
post #44 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

What is your point? What lesson?



Like metal interfering with reception-duh? The Titanium Powerbook had interference problems like how many years ago due to this same issue? Anl like the present MacBook pro is supposed to no longer be metal for the same reason?
More like why are you stating this- what's your point?

Originally Posted by Abster2core
As Jobs has already said ant the article states, "…plastic should improve reception versus the original's aluminum."
post #45 of 88
I don't get the battery life test while purposely leaving the wifi on, I'd still like to know some real figures for best case scenario battery life.

I have a W850i at the moment. I only turn bluetooth on when i need it, no point in having it on when its not in use. The same goes for an iPhone, especially the 3G. I'm not going to be walking around with one in my pocket with the 3G, Wifi, GPS and Bluetooth turned on. Use it as you need it and it will last longer.
post #46 of 88
Get on it hackers!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #47 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

Zero comments? I guess nobody cares about the iPhone after all...

You only gave it 12 minutes, what do you expect?
post #48 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by anderkh View Post

It sucks so bad that I've decided to not get one now... How hard could it be to separate address book and calendars? The top reason for me to get an iPhone is to go to one device, but if I can't have my personal calendars, I'll stick with my blackberry (where the battery lasts, I get 3G performance, and I can tether to my laptop).

Ken

Though not a guarantee, lets hope that a future software update or third party application will correct this. If Apple is seriously going after the Blackberry crowd, I would be surprised if the sync issue wasn't addressed. Is there a device out there that does this now?
post #49 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

You're only showing your ignorance. The real properties of plastics vary, it depends on the type in question. If it's polycarbonate, it will NOT shatter. Apple has used polycarbonate on its iBooks, iPod faces and so on, I think every portable Apple device that has plastic on the outer shell. I'll see if I can get a little sheet of it and shoot a video of me trying to shatter it. It rebounds strong enough that the hammer can be a danger, and still not crack or shatter. It's quite scary.

I build a lot of things from poly and other plastics. People who don't know much about plastics don't understand how superior they are for many uses.

They can even be metal plated, and often are. One manufacturing technique is to plate them with aluminum and then to anodize it.
post #50 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

And what does a web data plan have to do with bad reception on calls?

I'm just curious. When I first was looking at plans after 9/11, I saw that Sprint charged $15 for its data plan, AT&T charged $20, and Verison charged $45.

Sprint still charges me $15 for the 3G service (unlimited), AT&T charges $30 for their 3G unlimited plan. So, as you're on Verison, I was wondering if they still charged $45.
post #51 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I'm just curious. When I first was looking at plans after 9/11, I saw that Sprint charged $15 for its data plan, AT&T charged $20, and Verison charged $45.

Sprint still charges me $15 for the 3G service (unlimited), AT&T charges $30 for their 3G unlimited plan. So, as you're on Verison, I was wondering if they still charged $45.

That's all changed- your figures are 7 years old- no? See below- they are all comparable.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0...wireless-plan/
post #52 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

That's all changed- your figures are 7 years old- no? See below- they are all comparable.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0...wireless-plan/

I'm still paying $15, AT&T is charging $30, we know that, so those rates aren't totally correct.
post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

And there you have it- Mossberg's call in NYC dropped 3 times in a cab along the Hudson and worked flawlessly with a cheap Verizon phone. That's why in NYC us with Verizon will most likely not change to crappy AT&Fee. The choice is not merely for the phone that matters, more importantly it's the quality of the call.
Regardless of the physical prowess and features on any device (Apple or otherwise) it's the call quality stupid- IT"S A PHONE FIRST.

It isn't just in NY. It is in lots of places. I would love to own an iPhone but I do not keep a landline anymore and that means that making and receiving calls cannot be a hit and miss proposition.

I'll credit Apple and the competition they have inspired with absolutely improving things over at Verizon. I have an unlimited consumer data plan for $15 a month, and use it on a LG Dare which is a much better phone at a much better price than Verizon would have coughed up were it not for Apple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Are you still paying the minimum $45 a month for your web data plan?

Since the LG Dare is a feature phone versus a smart phone, it has the $15 VCAST pack option available. This allows unlimited data downloads.

I love Apple but sometimes they birth something great and just never come back and refine some of the details. They also simply refuse to indulge certain thoughts over time. They've been profoundly bad and have had loads of bad press over battery issues both with the iPod and the iPhone. I don't think they suffered too badly for it in the mp3 player market because there was no one else there innovating and also providing infrastructure like Apple does and also doing it at a competitive price.

This is not true in the smartphone/cell arena though. Here people will put out one model of the phone with a microSD/microSDHC slot and let you pick your poison there. You can often even choose between regular and extended batteries for your phone. There are several carries set up who are providing infrastructure on par with Apple.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #54 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I'm still paying $15, AT&T is charging $30, we know that, so those rates aren't totally correct.

Tell you what- I have to go Verizon today at lunch anyway and will ask them. It's down the street.
post #55 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post


Since the LG Dare is a feature phone versus a smart phone, it has the $15 VCAST pack option available. This allows unlimited data downloads.

I love Apple but sometimes they birth something great and just never come back and refine some of the details. They also simply refuse to indulge certain thoughts over time. They've been profoundly bad and have had loads of bad press over battery issues both with the iPod and the iPhone. I don't think they suffered too badly for it in the mp3 player market because there was no one else there innovating and also providing infrastructure like Apple does and also doing it at a competitive price.

This is not true in the smartphone/cell arena though. Here people will put out one model of the phone with a microSD/microSDHC slot and let you pick your poison there. You can often even choose between regular and extended batteries for your phone. There are several carries set up who are providing infrastructure on par with Apple.

I don't quite understand your post. I sort of get the point you're making, but it's too convoluted.

Also, with the iPods, battery life is almost better than the competition, and is alsways better than Apple's specs. You can see that in all the reviews.

A phone is more difficult. But then, I have always plugged my phones in every night. I don't see the big deal with that. Anything else is laziness.

I don't understand your last sentence at all. Are you comparing the cell companies to Apple? If so, don't! Apple is NOT a cell company, in case you haven't noticed.
post #56 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by anderkh View Post

It sucks so bad that I've decided to not get one now... How hard could it be to separate address book and calendars? The top reason for me to get an iPhone is to go to one device, but if I can't have my personal calendars, I'll stick with my blackberry (where the battery lasts, I get 3G performance, and I can tether to my laptop).

Ken

Sorry but when I had my blackberry I was never able to have a personal calendar or contacts. Once its enterprise activated, it synced everything to the exchange server. Now that the iPhone displays the same behavior, all phones that has activesync might've always done this anyway.

If your blackberry is enterprise activated and you found a way to also have personal calendars, please by all means let me know how.
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I don't quite understand your post. I sort of get the point you're making, but it's too convoluted.

Also, with the iPods, battery life is almost better than the competition, and is alsways better than Apple's specs. You can see that in all the reviews.

A phone is more difficult. But then, I have always plugged my phones in every night. I don't see the big deal with that. Anything else is laziness.

I don't understand your last sentence at all. Are you comparing the cell companies to Apple? If so, don't! Apple is NOT a cell company, in case you haven't noticed.

With the iPod, Apple helped commoditize that market. If they made some mistakes along the way it really didn't hurt them because they were the market leader, they were good at sticking to the core of what the product was supposed to do, and lastly were likely to magically "discover" the importance of that feature the next round.

iPod battery life might be the best it has ever been, but it does not change the fact that Apple has taken bad press over it and somewhere along the line it still might help with that tipping point that seems to occur when a market leader suddenly becomes a market follower.

You plug your phone in every night and good for you. Do you ever go somewhere on the weekend, visit some friends and family or even enjoy a nice holiday weekend somewhere without desiring to cart along a phone charger? Many people expect to be able to do this and it is a reasonable market expectation that is being met by companies other than Apple.

You note the great battery life of the iPod and I will toss in another similar example from an "Apple-ish" company, Nintendo. I have always been amazed at how long the batteries go in the Nintendo DS/GBA. People do not mind trading slightly lower performance for phenomenal battery life, but Apple isn't providing that here. Your expectation is to plug in daily. If I take my phone off the charger Friday morning, I don't want to have to think about it until Sunday night when I'll be pondering the weekly grind. That is a very reasonable expectation for a cellphone.

You note that Apple is not a cell provider. They are also not a content provider of movies or music, nor are they an ISP. The point was that with the iPod, they helped tie together a process that was too cumbersome for most. With the iPhone they have less power due to the network and also appear to be offering fewer services due to not being able to tie it together with iTunes.

My phone has turn by turn GPS offered by Verizon. They make it as easy to use as my attempting to add something to my iPod via iTunes. Other phones on the AT&T network offer GPS built in or through AT&T. The app is either on the phone or downloaded directly to the phone via the cell network. Apple does not offer this yet even though their network provider does. Perhaps it will be offered once the application store is up but the point is that before Apple was a solution competing against a bunch of overly open, confusing, and conflicting solutions. If you bought your tune from Walmart online you still had to move it from a desktop to whatever application you used to manage your music or perhaps load it directly onto your MP3 player. It was more flexible but more confusing to the average consumer and Apple exploited that very well.

However it is not this way in the cell market. AT&T will offer to make AT&T Navigator run on any phone on their network that a company offering equipment will allow. It will be downloadable, installable and usable in a manner that is closed, but not confusing, much in the manner Apple had previously exploited with the iPod. This is true with games, music content, etc.

So to summarize, Apple is not leading a market while commoditizing it. It is already commoditized. Apple is not competing against a bunch of overly open solution providers utilizing the same network who end up crafting an overly convoluted and complicated solution which the consumer rejects while Apple offers an easy to use all in one solution. Instead Apple is competing against phone companies and network providers who insure the solutions are more limited, but also easily accessible and understandable the same ground Apple previously exploited. AT&T, Verizon, all of them insure that you can easily with the press of a button or two, get what you want on your phone. It may be for a small fee, but that is exactly what Apple was exploiting so well. You'll pay a little more for convenience is pretty much the Apple motto.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The phone feels "perfectly comfortable" in the hand courtesy of the plastic back.
Apple confirms that the plastic should improve reception versus the original's aluminum.
The journalist is "impressed" by the accuracy of GPS, but says the phone begs for voiced turn-by-turn directions.
Audio quality is better overall, particularly the speakerphone; headphones are of course still better.

Good to know these improvements for iPhone 3G. The reception is most important part of this upgrade.
post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajprice View Post

I don't get the battery life test while purposely leaving the wifi on, I'd still like to know some real figures for best case scenario battery life.

I have a W850i at the moment. I only turn bluetooth on when i need it, no point in having it on when its not in use. The same goes for an iPhone, especially the 3G. I'm not going to be walking around with one in my pocket with the 3G, Wifi, GPS and Bluetooth turned on. Use it as you need it and it will last longer.

I leave mine on. What do you think I'm going to do? Leave the house and turn the WiFi off, get to work and turn it back on, go to lunch and turn if off again and then back on when I get back to work and then off when I head home and then on again when I get home. Just leave it on.
post #60 of 88
What I want to know is... when the heck T-mobile will start to offer some kind of phone... ANY kind of phone... that starts to approach 1/10th the functionality and ease of use of the iPhone. Their current lineup sucks big time.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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post #61 of 88
The 3G phone comes with 2.0 firmware, correct?

If so, doesn't that mean that 2.0 should be released for current iPhone owners tomorrow?
post #62 of 88
Although I have no intention of getting the iPhone 3G, I do find myself taking another look at the iPod Touch... just to get access to the App Store.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I'm still paying $15, AT&T is charging $30, we know that, so those rates aren't totally correct.

Ok- Back from the Verizon store - Verizon charges $30 for an unlimited data plan.
Saw the new LG Dare, an obvious iPhone ripoff. However you don't have to get a data plan with it and it has a 3.2 mp camera.
post #64 of 88
When Pogue states that audio takes a giant leap forward this time and that "few cell phones sound this good"- does that mean that last year's iPhone was flawed in it's audio department? It seems to read that way.
I remember at the time Apple was squarely blaming AT&T and they in turn were blaming the iPhone itself. If it's an original iPhone flaw then history books will need to be rewritten.
Is there an iNterpreter in the house please to decipher?
post #65 of 88
The Pogue review states the APP store is available for the iTouch as well!! Fantastic!
I will wait for the iTouch upgrade and pounce. I wish they would add a camera to it but doubt it.
post #66 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

And for what it is worth, Mobile Magazine postulated that, "part of the reason why Apple may opt for a plastic back is that a metal back may interfere with all the wireless radios getting shoved into the new iPhone, like quad-band GSM, tri-band WCDMA, 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and so on."

According to Apple's Web site the iPhone 3G supports Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g), not (802.11 a/b/g/n).
I always have the right answers; you just sometimes ask the wrong questions.
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I always have the right answers; you just sometimes ask the wrong questions.
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post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

With the iPod, Apple helped commoditize that market. If they made some mistakes along the way it really didn't hurt them because they were the market leader, they were good at sticking to the core of what the product was supposed to do, and lastly were likely to magically "discover" the importance of that feature the next round.

iPod battery life might be the best it has ever been, but it does not change the fact that Apple has taken bad press over it and somewhere along the line it still might help with that tipping point that seems to occur when a market leader suddenly becomes a market follower.

You plug your phone in every night and good for you. Do you ever go somewhere on the weekend, visit some friends and family or even enjoy a nice holiday weekend somewhere without desiring to cart along a phone charger? Many people expect to be able to do this and it is a reasonable market expectation that is being met by companies other than Apple.

You note the great battery life of the iPod and I will toss in another similar example from an "Apple-ish" company, Nintendo. I have always been amazed at how long the batteries go in the Nintendo DS/GBA. People do not mind trading slightly lower performance for phenomenal battery life, but Apple isn't providing that here. Your expectation is to plug in daily. If I take my phone off the charger Friday morning, I don't want to have to think about it until Sunday night when I'll be pondering the weekly grind. That is a very reasonable expectation for a cellphone.

You note that Apple is not a cell provider. They are also not a content provider of movies or music, nor are they an ISP. The point was that with the iPod, they helped tie together a process that was too cumbersome for most. With the iPhone they have less power due to the network and also appear to be offering fewer services due to not being able to tie it together with iTunes.

My phone has turn by turn GPS offered by Verizon. They make it as easy to use as my attempting to add something to my iPod via iTunes. Other phones on the AT&T network offer GPS built in or through AT&T. The app is either on the phone or downloaded directly to the phone via the cell network. Apple does not offer this yet even though their network provider does. Perhaps it will be offered once the application store is up but the point is that before Apple was a solution competing against a bunch of overly open, confusing, and conflicting solutions. If you bought your tune from Walmart online you still had to move it from a desktop to whatever application you used to manage your music or perhaps load it directly onto your MP3 player. It was more flexible but more confusing to the average consumer and Apple exploited that very well.

However it is not this way in the cell market. AT&T will offer to make AT&T Navigator run on any phone on their network that a company offering equipment will allow. It will be downloadable, installable and usable in a manner that is closed, but not confusing, much in the manner Apple had previously exploited with the iPod. This is true with games, music content, etc.

So to summarize, Apple is not leading a market while commoditizing it. It is already commoditized. Apple is not competing against a bunch of overly open solution providers utilizing the same network who end up crafting an overly convoluted and complicated solution which the consumer rejects while Apple offers an easy to use all in one solution. Instead Apple is competing against phone companies and network providers who insure the solutions are more limited, but also easily accessible and understandable the same ground Apple previously exploited. AT&T, Verizon, all of them insure that you can easily with the press of a button or two, get what you want on your phone. It may be for a small fee, but that is exactly what Apple was exploiting so well. You'll pay a little more for convenience is pretty much the Apple motto.

As far as weekends go, it's really not too much to ask for you to take your recharger with you. If you don't want to be bothered, that's your decision, but it's also your own problem that you've made for yourself. Yes, it's true that Apple does its own thing, and a replaceable battery would have its advantages, but it's really not a major problem until three, or so, years down the road when it may need replacement. By then, most people have moved on anyway.

I don't know what you mean by not tying it to iTunes. That is something they very definitely are doing. This is unique amongst phone makers, and gives Apple mucho power in that area. They are the only phone maker that also has a major music video store that the cell companies are allowing to be used over their networks, so you are wrong there. This will also prove to be a big revenue source, along with the new app store, which is inside iTunes:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/25603716/site/14081545

None of those companies offer what iTunes, and the app store will offer, not even close.

As far as the supposed lack of turn by turn GPS, well, we'll see. Apple says it isn't accurate enough, but Apple is often conservative about things like this. I'd rather wait until the phone is actually out, and we know for sure. It's certainly not a deal breaker for most people.
post #68 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by trevc View Post

The 3G phone comes with 2.0 firmware, correct?

If so, doesn't that mean that 2.0 should be released for current iPhone owners tomorrow?

Presumably so, though you may have to wait a few days.
post #69 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Ok- Back from the Verizon store - Verizon charges $30 for an unlimited data plan.
Saw the new LG Dare, an obvious iPhone ripoff. However you don't have to get a data plan with it and it has a 3.2 mp camera.

That's good, competition rears its ugly head.
post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

When Pogue states that audio takes a giant leap forward this time and that "few cell phones sound this good"- does that mean that last year's iPhone was flawed in it's audio department? It seems to read that way.
I remember at the time Apple was squarely blaming AT&T and they in turn were blaming the iPhone itself. If it's an original iPhone flaw then history books will need to be rewritten.
Is there an iNterpreter in the house please to decipher?

The original iPhone was not known for sterling call quality.
post #71 of 88
yes Exchange will wipe out your personal iCal calendar - unless you subscribe to MobileMe and host it in the Apple Cloud! methinks this is a not too subtle marketing push for MobileMe by Apple. but hey if it's your Exchange business phone, isn't your business already paying for everything anyway? what's another $99 per year on top of $1000 annual AT&T business service? plus tax.
post #72 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

yes Exchange will wipe out your personal iCal calendar - unless you subscribe to MobileMe and host it in the Apple Cloud! methinks this is a not too subtle marketing push for MobileMe by Apple. but hey if it's your Exchange business phone, isn't your business already paying for everything anyway? what's another $99 per year on top of $1000 annual AT&T business service? plus tax.


"yes Exchange will wipe out your personal iCal calendar - unless you subscribe to MobileMe and host it in the Apple Cloud! "

Source please?
post #73 of 88
What's the news/update on being able to buy it thru the Apple Online Store. How come there's no info on this yet!? And, how will activation work?
post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

yes Exchange will wipe out your personal iCal calendar - unless you subscribe to MobileMe and host it in the Apple Cloud! methinks this is a not too subtle marketing push for MobileMe by Apple. but hey if it's your Exchange business phone, isn't your business already paying for everything anyway? what's another $99 per year on top of $1000 annual AT&T business service? plus tax.

It is incorrect to assume that most employers are paying for iPhones simply because iPhones can be used for business. The vast majority of work email accounts are not critical enough to make company provided smart phones a good investment.

What's another $99 a year you ask? Answer: Not chump change to everyone.
post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What's the news/update on being able to buy it thru the Apple Online Store. How come there's no info on this yet!? And, how will activation work?

they won't be selling it on apple's online store. activation is required before you leave the store.
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post #76 of 88
The one thing that bugs me most about these reviews, is these guys (and they're always usually men) get to write up these exhaustive reviews as if it were from a real consumers vantage. Meanwhile they get to skip all the usual costs and waiting in line and service interruptions that the rest of us "real consumers" have to endure on launch day

Must be nice.
post #77 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by carloblackmore View Post

The one thing that bugs me most about these reviews, is these guys (and they're always usually men) get to write up these exhaustive reviews as if it were from a real consumers vantage. Meanwhile they get to skip all the usual costs and waiting in line and service interruptions that the rest of us "real consumers" have to endure on launch day

Must be nice.

I don't see how what you're saying is relevant to the reviews.

And if you want female reviews, there is Jacqui Cheng at ARs, for example. There are others.

But, let's face it, this geekiness is a mostly men only thing.

Women are too smart to get caught up in it. They just want something that works for them, and they don't care about the whys and hows.
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I don't see how what you're saying is relevant to the reviews.

And if you want female reviews, there is Jacqui Cheng at ARs, for example. There are others.

But, let's face it, this geekiness is a mostly men only thing.

Women are too smart to get caught up in it. They just want something that works for them, and they don't care about the whys and hows.

I think he was just qualifying his use of the term 'guys.'

Let's face it: Jacqui Cheng is an exception in an otherwise male-dominated business.
post #79 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I think he was just qualifying his use of the term 'guys.'

Let's face it: Jacqui Cheng is an exception in an otherwise male-dominated business.

I don't know how he could qualify it. He mean "guys", as in male.

Besides, it's also irrelevant. mostly guys are interested in this anyway.

How many female members do we have on this site? We have almost 50,000 members. I'd like to know. I'll bet it's very little.

So the fact that most reviewers are male doesn't matter.

We can see that by the comments all too often made here about how wives and girlfriends screw up, or are offered the members cast-offs, etc.

It would be good to hear from the "other side" once an a while.

It is very interesting that my Mac user group here in NYC (MetroMac), which has about 900 registered members, and a fair number who aren't registered, has about 40% female membership.

But, on the forums, most posters are again, male.

It would be interesting to find out why.
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

As far as weekends go, it's really not too much to ask for you to take your recharger with you. If you don't want to be bothered, that's your decision, but it's also your own problem that you've made for yourself. Yes, it's true that Apple does its own thing, and a replaceable battery would have its advantages, but it's really not a major problem until three, or so, years down the road when it may need replacement. By then, most people have moved on anyway.

I don't know what you mean by not tying it to iTunes. That is something they very definitely are doing. This is unique amongst phone makers, and gives Apple mucho power in that area. They are the only phone maker that also has a major music video store that the cell companies are allowing to be used over their networks, so you are wrong there. This will also prove to be a big revenue source, along with the new app store, which is inside iTunes:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/25603716/site/14081545

None of those companies offer what iTunes, and the app store will offer, not even close.

As far as the supposed lack of turn by turn GPS, well, we'll see. Apple says it isn't accurate enough, but Apple is often conservative about things like this. I'd rather wait until the phone is actually out, and we know for sure. It's certainly not a deal breaker for most people.

We will have to agree to disagree on the charger matter. I suspect over the long run since there are complaints about the iPhone 3G's battery life being worse than the first one that battery issues will move up on the priority scale.

With the "tying it to iTunes" the point is that all cell platforms allow programs to be purchased for the phones through their respective provider. You may think the Apple version best in class but the advantage if any is small. I'm sure Verizon, AT&T and others already derive plenty of revenue from their own selling of apps as well. One issue here though is Apple is not allowing any mixing of apps between the cell providers and Apple. This in my view will actually lead the iPhone to be at a disadvantage. Apple can hype the iPhone as a new computing platform but the reality is all the other cell phone "computing platforms" often already come with much of the software anyone would need.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › First iPhone 3G reviews via the WSJ, USA Today and NY Times