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Apple plans mystery "product transition" before September's end - Page 8

post #281 of 735
The posts of Solsun and others arguing that Apple's touch technology is going to be built into multiple devices seems the strongest candidate in this horse race (although some of the dark horse candidates have things going for them as well). In particular, this would differentiate them from clone makers.

One additional consideration in favor of a move in this direction is that Microsoft's Surface Computer has been getting good reviews, and that one MS executive stated that there was a $10 billion market for the device. (E.g., as ordering devices in restaurants, as gaming devices in retail spaces and airlines, as informational kiosks everywhere, etc.) Apple mightn't want to let MS establish too great a lead in buyers' mindspace in such a rich market.

OTOH, if Apple did come out with built-in touch in its iMac line, the only way this would lock out competitors would be if independent developers were encouraged to rely on the touch interface. But why would they do that, if it would lock out 90% of the Mac user base? Another OTOH is that it seems unlikely that a rumor of such a wide-ranging hardware transition hadn't appeared earlier.

Anyway, if touch is the new transition, then I hope Apple will avoid a safe, beige, "left-brained" name like "Surface Computer." I suggest TapTop. It's more memorable, being "anchored" in laptop. It's almost unforgettable. And it has good overtones, suggesting things like "tiptop." ("Surface" has bad overtones, suggesting "shallow," "brittle," etc.)

==============
Transition candidates would be more plausible if they involved an innovation that could be kept a secret until just before release. One such innovation would be a chip that would give a Mac built-in, hardware-based "software metering," so that a user would be able to run software on a rental basis. This would give users inexpensive access to expensive software they would only rarely use--but that would be quite rewarding to them anyway. They'd have access to much more software than on any competing platform. It would be a tremendous selling point--and only a company that controlled the hardware could offer this in a way that was secure enough to reassure software vendors. (E.g., perhaps there would be online monitoring by Apple of metered computers to ensure that the security of the metering hadn't been compromised.)

It would appeal to software developers because it would lower their marketing expense--and probably reduce piracy considerably as well. Small software companies challenging established giants would particularly like this, because they wouldn't have to get customers to shell out big bucks to displace their competitors.

Even if this isn't what Apple has in mind, it ought to be. (Maybe next year.)

===================
Alternatively, maybe it's a built-in chip that performs speedy encryption, or that monitors the computer for malware. (Again, if it isn't, it should be--eventually.)
post #282 of 735
I'm still with either all touch line-up for iPods (minus the shuffle and nano) OR the MacFolio. Shutting out competitors either means getting to a developing market first and dominating it, or underpricing all competition in an already established market.

Undeveloped markets: Maybe the MacFolio which would be a WiFi or wireless network computer, super thin and priced so unbelievably low that you couldn't imagine buying another "sub-notebook" or Blackberry for productivity. The problem with this scenario... you also cannibalize your existing portable computers. If a so-called MacFolio were more akin to a WiFi/wireless enabled 'personal planner' (aka e-book) it would not directly compete with the regular portable computer line and would instead own the niche currently being carved out by Amazon and Sony. How big is the market for this kind of 'planner'? Just look at the size of the paper planner and refills market. It's huge, folks. Really huge. And if this new planner worked on WiFi/WiMax/cellular networks, this kind of connectivity would be an enormous gain over paper planners. At a subsidized price from Apple, it's even more compelling, and with access to iTunes and App Store, it's a total category killer.

Even more exciting than whatever is eventually released is the creative suggestions on this thread. Great ideas popping up here.

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post #283 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanmugam View Post

i personally believe it is Laptop line - MacBook & Pro getting a complete make over and price reduction

Is that really a transition?

C.
post #284 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

a key "product transition" that cuts back on its profit margins to help shut out rivals.

drop Apple's gross margins from 34.8 percent , ultimately settling at about 30 percent during Apple's fiscal 2009.

Oppenheimer explains that cost will be a driving factor.

The new, unnamed product will continue to have "technologies and features that others can't match," according to the CFO.

The article describes the unnamed product as "new", but the quotes clearly refer to price drops for an existing product. Would a 4.8% margin cut be designed to stymie rival entrance against an existing dominant product, or to create gains in a lower market share product area? What are the initial margins expected in order to float a new product?

I read that the Japanese are hot for the iPhone despite availabilty of more fully featured phones in that market, because of form factor. Does this mean even cheaper iPhones?

There are still alot of shuffle like alternatives to iPods at very low prices on the market. Could it mean mean $10 iPods at the shuffle end of the scale?

The statement sounds like lower prices for one of those two, but not like some of the exciting products mentioned in this thread (tablets, mba, docks, etc.), but I don't really know.
post #285 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Knights View Post

The posts of Solsun and others arguing that Apple's touch technology is going to be built into multiple devices seems the strongest candidate in this horse race (although there some of the dark horse candidates have things going for them as well). In particular, this would differentiate them from clone makers.

One additional consideration in favor of a move in this direction is that Microsoft's Surface Computer has been getting good reviews, and that one MS executive stated that there was a $10 billion market for the device. (E.g., as ordering devices in restaurants, as gaming devices in retail spaces and airlines, as informational kiosks everywhere, etc.) Apple mightn't want to let MS establish too great a lead in buyers' mindspace in such a rich market.

Microsoft's $10,000 bath-tub smoke and mirrors machine is hardly in a "rich market."

What makes more sense in a restaurant?: an overpriced Microsoft table that people are going to be eating off of and touching, or normal tables and waiters taking orders on the much cooler and affordable iPod touch using a simple custom app?
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post #286 of 735
2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
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2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
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post #287 of 735
If Apple starts adopting the traditional model for cell phones and video game systems (subsidized hardware) to drive software sales, yes, we could be looking at $99 dollar iPod touches. It's too soon to drop the iPhone price yet again. Way too soon. With sell-out product globally, it would be insane to undercut their own product at this stage.

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post #288 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Microsoft's $10,000 bath-tub smoke and mirrors machine is hardly in a "rich market." What makes more sense in a restaurant? An overpriced Microsoft table that people are going to be eating off of and touching, or normal tables and waiters taking orders on the much cooler and affordable iPod touch using a simple custom app?

I agree that Apple focusing on making touches (along with the iPhone) absolutely ubiquitous is likely a top priority right now. App Store and iTunes sales are the hits that drive the hardware.

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post #289 of 735
AppleTV gets bigger hard disc and Blu-Ray at same price point. Sony PS3 is really wreaking havoc.
-or-
iPod Touch w/GPS and video camera.
-or-
Way out there: Multitouch displays.
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post #290 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Is that really a transition?

C.

Yes, if we have

13" 15" 17" MacBook and MacBook Pro and with all the goodies like Blu Ray, New CPUs, Larger HDD and option like SSD, LED Display

Heck, it is better to let go "Pro" moniker and have MacBooks in different configuration and prices

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Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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post #291 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by godrifle View Post

Sony PS3 is really wreaking havoc.

It's certainly wreaking havoc with Sony's profits.

C.
post #292 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnqh View Post

His words are something like Apple doesn't want to leave a margin so high that it creates an "umbrella" for competitors to rest under in terms of price.

So, this is NOT A MAC. No matter how Apple prices Mac, the above statement doesn't apply. Look elsewhere.

I don't agree, and it's why I asked the original question.

not wanting to have high margins that creates an "umbrella" for competitors to rest under definitely can apply to Macs, "shutting out competition" doesn't realistically refer to Macs. If Oppenheimer actually said the former and not the latter, it gives me more hope that he was talking about Macs not iPods.

Whether people like it or not, PCs are competition to Macs. 50% of retail Mac purchases are to brand-new customers - i.e. they had a PC before and when it came time to replace their current machine, you can bet that they compared PC to Mac and decided Mac. So how many are comparing PC to Mac and choosing PC? The answer (IHMO) is easily the same number of people again, and possibly up to 3 - 4 times as many people.

By not having a DVD burner in the bottom-end MacBook, by having 2.1 GHz as the lowest-clocked processor option (lower clocked processors are much cheaper and offer the possibility of more attractive storage/RAM options*), by tying screen size to overall computing power, Apple has definitely "created an umbrella" under which competitors can rest.

* i.e., given the choice between 1.8 GHz machine with 250 GB HDD, 2GB RAM, DVD burner at $899 and a 2.1 GHz machine with 120 GB HDD, 1 GB RAM and a DVD/CD-RW combo drive at $1099, many will think the slower machine has a better balance of features.

Roll on next Tuesday says I! The suspense is killing me!
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post #293 of 735
MacBook Mini
----------------
10" - $799 - the EeePC killer

MacBooks
--------------------
13" - $999
15" - $1299
17" - $1599

MacBookPro
---------------------
13" - $1299
15" - $1599
17" - $1999

YES, i am greedy ...

not sure, other than Graphics and Bly-Ray(Dvd burner) how to differentiate the Pro and consumer line and if this turns out what happens to MBA?

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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post #294 of 735
Unless it can be shown otherwise, can't the 3G iPhone's expected global volume and lower pricing itself account for the overall lower margins?
post #295 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post

Unless it can be shown otherwise, can't the 3G iPhone's expected global volume and lower pricing itself account for the overall lower margins?

but Apple gets the difference in price ($399 to $199) from the telcos, so it is not hitting the margins...

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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post #296 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanmugam View Post

MacBook Mini
----------------

I still like the idea of OS X going free, but as a consumer I like the sound of MacBook Mini. :-)

I have been keenly watching this stuff on the Web..
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ7mDw...eature=related

Folks are buying $500 atom-based netbooks and installing OS X on them.
The performance isn't too bad either.

But you gotta face it, you can't launch one of these without killing the Air.
Are umbrellas not full of Air?

C.
post #297 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanmugam View Post

but Apple gets the difference in price ($399 to $199) from the telcos, so it is not hitting the margins...

A couple of questions:

1) Do we know that the wireless providers are paying Apple $200 per handset up front?

2) If not up front, how could Apple report the earning before they were received?
post #298 of 735
we're all going to be suprised. My guess is something along the lines of Tablet PC. He said "technologies and features that can't be matched," so the mystery isn't a MB/MBP revision. Besides, we know that's coming anyway.
post #299 of 735
Wow, there's a lot of replies to this article when the answer seems so obvious. I know Apple can never be predicted with 100% certainty, but lets get real.

1) New Montevena chips released
2) Dozens of competing notebooks flood the market
3) MB/MBP due for redesign
4) Microsoft about to launch a $300mil ad campaign going after Mac
5) Back to school

I'm not a Vegas odds maker, but come on!
post #300 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I still like the idea of OS X going free, but as a consumer I like the sound of MacBook Mini. :-)

I have been keenly watching this stuff on the Web..
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ7mDw...eature=related

Folks are buying $500 atom-based netbooks and installing OS X on them.
The performance isn't too bad either.

But you gotta face it, you can't launch one of these without killing the Air.
Are umbrellas not full of Air?

C.

MacBook Touch

ok some news sorry rumors

http://www.macdailynews.com/index.ph...macbook_touch/

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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post #301 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post

A couple of questions:

1) Do we know that the wireless providers are paying Apple $200 per handset up front?

2) If not up front, how could Apple report the earning before they were received?

that no one knows, how it works out, i guess even they do not disclose to share holders ...

but sure they moved from (getting money from 24 months contract) to getting money up front with 3G iPhone

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

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Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply
post #302 of 735
i think, given the update of the iphone/touch OS, that the mystery product could be the Apple TV upgrade. it's been Steve's "pet project" for several years now and he won't give up on it. think about an Apple TV with all the capabilities of the iPhone/iPod Touch! internet, email, contacts, calender, google maps and more apps on your TV. Plus i think i will include a DVR. the Ultimate competition for TiVo! Give it a 500 Gig hard drive and it could replace the "Time Machine" as a home server.

Think about it. A device that could be used wirelessly or by cable, it could control every computer in your home, via iphone remote or it's own multi-touch remote, it's a DVR, a link to your iTunes and fully internet capable via iphone/touch qwerty keyboard. It can link up with any cable/SAT or over the air broadcast. This has no competition and if they put a $299 price tag on it, who wouldn't buy this!

You heard it here first, I call it the iHome!
post #303 of 735
It's going to be new cinema displays with built-in iSight and Apple TV. That would be a truly awesome product.
post #304 of 735
How about a twist on the OS X licensing gambit...

We know Apple likes to control their designs, but they don't actually build them anymore...

Dell will sell anything that includes a Dell logo on it (PDAs, mp3 players, printers, etc...)...

Dell has probably the most streamlined mass manufacturing system for computers...

Dell re-packages drivers for their systems...

Apple licenses Dell to build a low-end Mac Mini (mini tower) replacement featuring Mac OS X . This system is cross-branded Dell/Apple and Dell provides the system support.

Apple wins from software/brand licensing and future software sales...

Dell wins with a product that captures both the Dell and Apple branding loyalty, boosts their profits from additional system sales, and can leverage the competition with Microsoft...

Apple also wins in that they crush the need for a hacked clone system...

Consumers win with a new low-cost entry into the world of Mac, a product they may not of considered before due to price or unfamilarity with Apple computers. But they know Dell and would be comfortable with that purchase. These would be consumers that wouldn't necessarily have bought an Apple computer otherwise...

Another Apple win, they don't need to pay for the R&D on the system...
post #305 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by powderdust View Post

It's going to be new cinema displays with built-in iSight and Apple TV. That would be a truly awesome product.

with touch screen too - bring it on!
post #306 of 735
or maybe they are going to produce enough iPhones so we can have a chance of buying one in the UK. lol
post #307 of 735
My guess: Dropping the iPod Classic and changing the iPod nano to a touchscreen also. The shuffle will stay as is (or change a little).
post #308 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Folks are buying $500 atom-based netbooks and installing OS X on them.
The performance isn't too bad either.

But you gotta face it, you can't launch one of these without killing the Air.

Nonsense. The eeePC and its ilk are not in the same category as the Air. Who in their right mind, when what they want is a tiny laptop with 10" or smaller screen actually goes and gets an Air? Not many people.

If you are buying an Air, you're not interested in minuscule laptops. However, there are plenty of other people who are interested in minuscule laptops so it might be worth Apple making one.
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post #309 of 735
Expanding movie rentals with a subscription model (similar to netflix). X @ a time. Bundled with AppleTV purchase for X months.

or

All notebooks to go multi-touch.
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post #310 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Speaking of overstatement, the high price of retail copies of Windows is irrelevant, because almost no one buys it that way. Microsoft charges major manufacturers (that buy in bulk, as you say) about $40 a license, depending on version. Apple could easily match that price.

I don't want to go off-topic talking about Windows OEM licensing, so my point is that if Apple were to license OSX, their sale of the license -whether it's $20 or $100 per machine- is mostly profit and is tantamount to the profit Apple makes off a hardware sale. Especially if done in bulk.

Again, I don't think this is likely. I'd give it about a 5% chance of happening, but dismissing it because of what happened 15 years ago is silly.

We are both agreeing that it's unlikely, but for argument's sake...

What do you think is the average selling price of Macs? Let's say it's $1500, I think that's a reasonable estimate. Apple's typical margin is 30%. That's $500 profit for each Mac sold...a far cry from "$20 or $100" for OEM licensing! (Admittedly, I think their Mac margin is lower than their overall margin, but the result is the same.) Every Mac clone that is purchased instead of Apple hardware is a significant loss to Apple unless they charge at least, say, $200 for the OEM license. Now that $600 budget PC becomes a $760 Mac clone ($200 - $40 for Vista). I think you lose a lot of appeal with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Apple have already made OS X - It's paid for already. The only question is, how should they now make money from it?

If Apple licensed OS X to Sony - and charged Sony $100 per OEM copy - that's $100 additional revenue. And another $100 if the customer buys iLife.

Please explain cannibalization. Why should Apple automatically lose hardware sales if this happened? Are you saying that Mac hardware isn't good enough? Are you saying people wouldn't buy Mac hardware if they could buy a Vaio? I happen to believe that Mac hardware can stand on its own feet.

Now turn your question around. How much money does Apple lose by only being able to sell iWork, MobileMe and all its SOFTWARE products only to Mac hardware. If OS X had 30% market share. How much more software could Apple sell? And how many more developers would be attracted to the platform?

C.

"Please explain cannibalization." The cannibalization comes not so much from someone offering a machine similar to something Apple currently offers in terms of features. I agree that Apple's designs would win out there. The cannibalization comes from someone offering a machine that Apple doesn't, such as a budget laptop. A $700 Mac clone would most certainly eat into Apple's MacBook sales. A $1000 Mac clone minittower would most certainly eat into iMac sales. It's just an opinion, but I think Apple would have to set the OEM license too high to make up for thost lost hardware profits. (BTW: Saying "it's already paid for" is fine until you are trying to pay for R&D for the next version...pretty short sighted.)

To use a little fuzzy math, let's say Apple is twice as efficent as MS in developing and maintaining their OS (ie, MS pays twice as much as Apple to develop a particular feature, market share as no relevance in how much it costs). But MS currently has better than a 10:1 market share advantage. That means that Apple needs to charge 5 times as much (10/2) for each copy of OS X than MS charges for Vista in order to cover their development investment. They achieve that by the profit margins on the hardware sales, not by selling OS X itself.

Your point about additional iWork sales is a good one that I had not thought of before, but keep in mind that MobileMe already is PC-compatible, so no real advantage from Mac OS market share increase (ok, a little bit).
post #311 of 735
If it is to be a 'new' product. Adding touch wouldn't cut it.

My bets are on Apple TV (as in a real commodity item (which obviously means lower margins)) but with the added Apple shebang (ie. AppleTV built-in with added functionality Tivo like?).

Or what about a games console... tying in iPhones as game controllers?
post #312 of 735
Quote:
Quote:

I apologise, I did not realise that I wasn't permitted to disagree with people.



Was this OS X version 6 or OS X version 7 ?

C.

hehe, first of all there is no such thing as OS X version 6 or 7. I hope I don't burst your bubble but the "X" stands for 10. before that it was OS9, OS8, System 7, System 6.

And yes it was between system 6/7 through OS8/9 that the mac clones existed. And guess what, they sucked. The first thing that Jobs did when he came back to Apple was kill them off.

Look, it's just not going to happen. It doesn't make sense from a business standpoint. Basically everyone here (including me) has explained it very well. Nor does it make sense technologically.

I know that you would love to buy a cheap ass dell with OSX on it, but it's not happening anytime soon.
post #313 of 735
I bet they will launch an iPhone mini before Christmas.

Or/and an iPhone Pro....both to become number two in the smartphone segment after Nokia.

Thats what they want...

If they launch an iPhone mini and/or iPhone Pro it will be clear that they have complete mobile phone platform ready. That would be a shock for the Androids as well as for Nokia....would be double marketing strike:-)

cheers
ris natar
post #314 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

By not having a DVD burner in the bottom-end MacBook, by having 2.1 GHz as the lowest-clocked processor option (lower clocked processors are much cheaper and offer the possibility of more attractive storage/RAM options*), by tying screen size to overall computing power, Apple has definitely "created an umbrella" under which competitors can rest.

* i.e., given the choice between 1.8 GHz machine with 250 GB HDD, 2GB RAM, DVD burner at $899 and a 2.1 GHz machine with 120 GB HDD, 1 GB RAM and a DVD/CD-RW combo drive at $1099, many will think the slower machine has a better balance of features.

I completely agree with that. Apple has worked itself into a corner with the way it increases processor speeds each revision at the expense of other features.
post #315 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

"Please explain cannibalization." The cannibalization comes not so much from someone offering a machine similar to something Apple currently offers in terms of features. I agree that Apple's designs would win out there. The cannibalization comes from someone offering a machine that Apple doesn't, such as a budget laptop.

Sorry, I still don't buy it. If someone wants a budget laptop that Apple do not make, they are not gonna buy an Apple. So no cannibalization takes place.

Cannibalization would only take place if Apple's hardware is not competitive. As was the case back in the 90s.

What I meant by "Its already paid for", is that Apple already funds OS X development based on its current locked model. Unlocking simply means you can charge less per customer.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

To use a little fuzzy math, let's say Apple is twice as efficent as MS in developing and maintaining their OS (ie, MS pays twice as much as Apple to develop a particular feature, market share as no relevance in how much it costs). But MS currently has better than a 10:1 market share advantage. That means that Apple needs to charge 5 times as much (10/2) for each copy of OS X than MS charges for Vista in order to cover their development investment.

I think that's a bit too fuzzy.
If OSX's market share tripled overnight, it wouldn't cost any extra to maintain OSX. But Apples revenues would go up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

They achieve that by the profit margins on the hardware sales, not by selling OS X itself.

I don't think that is true, but let's imagine it is. You are saying that Apple's OS X development costs are massive, and that cost has to be borne by Apple hardware sales.

That would always put Apple hardware at a price disadvantage because a huge OS X tax would be levied on top. If that were true, Apple would have even more reason to license OS X because it would allow them to cut hardware prices.


C.
post #316 of 735
Ok one more somewhat out of left field possibility, one that I've yet seen mentioned...

Rosetta for Windows Applications

This would allow Mac users to run native Windows applications on OS X.

The development costs of which would definately impact their earnings, but they would gain switchers in the long run and that will eventually break even or produce a comparatively small profit for continued development costs.

Most of the pieces are there software wise with the Wine project, they would just need to add a bit of Apple touch to it to make it more mainstream. Another possibility would be something built on virtualization technology, but you don't need to install a full fledged Windows install and have to maintain two operating systems.

That could be a real Windows killer, and one that would create a significant "transition" for PC users. It would also produce a significant opportunity for new sales in the business world.
post #317 of 735
What if it the "product transition" is an allusion to the mention of Apple going to put LED screens in all their Mac computers by the end of 2008?
Maybe the can finish this transition of going greener by the end of September, meaning new Cinema Displays, iMacs and MacBooks, as they still are not LED backlit.

Regarding the licensing: I hope not, but maybe it is happening and it will turn out good. Who knows.

And I don't think they will put touch screens into some Macs, if there is no accompanying OS. They can release touch screen Macs when Snow Leopard or whatever OS capable of touch is being released. It wouldn't make sense right now, at least for me.

I don't know about iPods or xMacs, as I don't lust for them right now. Only the new MacBook, with dedicated graphics would incite my hunger for a new Mac.

Have an excellent day.
post #318 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by trboyden View Post

Ok one more somewhat out of left field possibility, one that I've yet seen mentioned...

Rosetta for Windows Applications

This would allow Mac users to run native Windows applications on OS X.

The development costs of which would definately impact their earnings, but they would gain switchers in the long run and that will eventually break even or produce a comparatively small profit for continued development costs.

Most of the pieces are there software wise with the Wine project, they would just need to add a bit of Apple touch to it to make it more mainstream. Another possibility would be something built on virtualization technology, but you don't need to install a full fledged Windows install and have to maintain two operating systems.

That could be a real Windows killer, and one that would create a significant "transition" for PC users. It would also produce a significant opportunity for new sales in the business world.

How would allowing the running of Windows apps natively in the Mac OS be a "Windows killer?" That could then open the door to Windows malware. Apple is pushing developers towards its own Cocoa API, away from Carbon, so why would they introduce a new API for running Windows apps? There are already a wealth of apps written for Mac OS X, including Microsoft's own Office suite (though it's horrible like everything they release for Mac users). There are many Mac apps that work better than the Windows' alternatives.

You can already run Windows on a Mac natively with Boot Camp and virtually through things like Parallels. Apple doesn't have to make Apple-ified versions of everything and they would get backlash from independent developers if they did. That's why Apple is doing so well in general: they have focus and....VISION. They don't throw things at the wall to see what sticks like Microsoft because...THEY DON'T HAVE THE MONEY TO WASTE.
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #319 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanmugam View Post

...Heck, it is better to let go "Pro" moniker and have MacBooks in different configuration and prices...

I think this will be the core of the transition...
post #320 of 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by trboyden View Post

How about a twist on the OS X licensing gambit...

We know Apple likes to control their designs, but they don't actually build them anymore...

Dell will sell anything that includes a Dell logo on it (PDAs, mp3 players, printers, etc...)...

Dell has probably the most streamlined mass manufacturing system for computers...

Dell re-packages drivers for their systems...

Apple licenses Dell to build a low-end Mac Mini (mini tower) replacement featuring Mac OS X . This system is cross-branded Dell/Apple and Dell provides the system support.

Apple wins from software/brand licensing and future software sales...

Dell wins with a product that captures both the Dell and Apple branding loyalty, boosts their profits from additional system sales, and can leverage the competition with Microsoft...

Apple also wins in that they crush the need for a hacked clone system...

Consumers win with a new low-cost entry into the world of Mac, a product they may not of considered before due to price or unfamilarity with Apple computers. But they know Dell and would be comfortable with that purchase. These would be consumers that wouldn't necessarily have bought an Apple computer otherwise...

Another Apple win, they don't need to pay for the R&D on the system...

The bridges burned between Steve Jobs and Michael Dell go back to us NeXT folks when we released WebObjects. Michael pulled some stunts that didn't sit well with Steve.

You won't see Steve making a licensing deal with DELL.
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