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Steve Jobs confesses to poorly planned MobileMe launch - Page 2

post #41 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp;1289731Why are they [Apple

so secretive about security? Why force two presenters on security to drop out of presentations? Maybe they have a good reason, but they sure aren't sharing.

What was in that last update that I downloaded? Apple isn't going to say. It was just "fixes for stability and improved functionality". What the heck? Even Microsoft with their daily updates is more open about what they are doing.

The Mac is less susceptible to viruses and other security nastiest, it is not immune and this closed lip stance that Apple has taken on security reminds me of Microsoft of a few years back. Security issues? What security issues? We don't talk about security issues.

If they want to be closed about their new products, fine. That is just smart business, but when it comes to something like computer security, which affects us all they need to be more open.

Perhaps Apple's success at keeping its products virus free and less susceptible to other security issues is because it is so secretive about security.

Certainly you wouldn't see the U.S.'s FBI/CIA, England's MI6/MI5/DIS, or Israel's Shabak/Massad/Aman send any of its personnel to participate or share in an open conference on security.

And like them, Apple is not about to release its source codes. Unfortunately, there are a hell of a lot of thieves out there that are reverse engineering just about everything that is man-made. Releasing any information on fixes, updates and security in any order could only help them on discovery or in jeopardizing the integrity of Mac OS or its applications.
post #42 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

The computer industry as a whole is moving towards less expensive computers with generally lesser hardware requirements. Not all parts of it, but a growing percentage. Yet, Apple has done little of nothing to compete with in these growing markets. It is my hope that this might be part of the lower margins comment.

First off, technology in general is always getting cheaper as new technology comes out.

However, the ewaste desktop PC market is stagnant and Apple's competitively priced, yet profitable Macs are outpacing the industry 3 to 1. Don't expect them to jump into a dying market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

Yeah, the move to consumer products was a very intelligent one, but along with this move there seems to be a growing disconnect with their computer base. Again, referencing the lower cost computers.

Considering their growth and a 90% customer satisfaction rating, seems like they're doing something right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

There is also the move to get smaller, not just thinner, which Apple missed. Where is Apple's entrance into the booming Netbook market, or the fable iTablet to fill the niche between the iPod Touch (which isn't really an iPod at all) and the MacBook?

The netbook market of underpowered micro-laptops is hardly "booming." Apple has no interest in cannibalizing their far more popular mobile WiFi iPhone/iPod touch platform. The MacBook Air is one of the thinnest notebooks on the market, yet it comes with a full-size screen and keyboard and is very competitive in the emerging ultra-light laptop market.

Where would the fabled Mac tablet fit into their current line of Macs and/or iPhones/iPods? Tablet computers, in general, have been a flop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

They were on the forefront of the growing all-in-one movement, but I have seen little sign that they are going to do more than rest on their laurels in that department. While their competitors are offering more hardware extras (TV cards, etc.) for about the same price.

Really? They just released the sleeker, aluminum iMac last year with a similarly slick keyboard. The MacBook Air is an "all-in-one" just like all laptops are and it's very thin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

Where in the heck is the "X Mac" that people have been clamoring for for years now? In the remaining traditional PC market those that have a smaller less expensive workstation can grab a large portion of the market share. The Mac Pro is nice, but as with many other Apple computers is many times too much hardware for too much money.

A minority have been asking for a headless mini-tower Mac and Apple has no interest in putting out such a thing because, as I mentioned, the tower PC market is flat-lining and an xMac could be undercut by the competition. The next major transition in computing is not going to be simply PC to Mac, but desktop to laptop and mobile platforms in general.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

iPhoto stores the rankings and keywords in a database instead of in the tags for the picture as is the standard. This also irks me since it means that if anything should go wrong with the monolithic database (Which we all know from messing with Window's registry would never happen right?) then I have lost all of the time put into those. And for what reason? So it is more difficult to move my photos to another photo management program? A form or lock in?

Well, I'd say iPhoto's database is a tad more trustworthy and stable than the Windows Registry. Just a tad.

But what format are you're photos in? Is Apple pushing some new proprietary format on you as Microsoft tried with Windows Media Photo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

iWorks, especially the newly expanded Numbers. Why in the love of all that is holy did Apple think we needed yet another proprietary spreadsheet format? I truly wish that they would join up with the OpenOffice movement and incorporate the best of their iWorks with the OpenDocument standard format. Or if you don't like Sun being in charge then branch it off and make their own program to work with OpenDocument. Last time I checked I couldn't even open an open document formatted file in iWorks. Even Micorosft Office can open open document formatted files now. Yet Apple seems to want to lock us into yet another proprietary file format.

While Apple has a symbiotic relationship with the open source community, they don't have to support every new paradigm they spit out. iWork likely doesn't support ODF and such because...hardly anyone uses those formats. Not only that, Apple's Pages, Keynote, and Numbers formats can likely offer more elegant, impressive graphics and effects. Of course, they can all be exported into a myriad of different widely-used formats and open those formats with pretty good conversion.

OpenOffice is archaic, clumsy and simply tries to clone the look and feel of Microsoft's Office. Apple's iWork suite is much more modern and user friendly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

Then beyond just open source software and formats, I was also referring to the openness of the company as a whole.

Why are they so secretive about security? Why force two presenters on security to drop out of presentations? Maybe they have a good reason, but they sure aren't sharing.

Sorry, I'm not following. Presenters?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

What was in that last update that I downloaded? Apple isn't going to say. It was just "fixes for stability and improved functionality". What the heck? Even Microsoft with their daily updates is more open about what they are doing.

The last update you likely downloaded was Apple's DNS patch, which was detailed in Software Update. Sometimes they do just say "bug fixes." They elaborate when major changes or advances are made. They don't have to detail every little fix, which the sensationalist tech media then raves about "well this should have been here from day one." All good software is a work in progress. Most consumers don't care about "fix #45: iChat's left window corner was not quite as rounded as the others."

Quote:
Originally Posted by mknopp View Post

The Mac is less susceptible to viruses and other security nastiest, it is not immune and this closed lip stance that Apple has taken on security reminds me of Microsoft of a few years back. Security issues? What security issues? We don't talk about security issues.

Why would they blabber about the holes they're trying to patch!? The media would make an issue of it and more importantly, attackers would know exactly where to turn.

With that said, look at the subject of this thread: MobileMe. They have a dedicated chat line for its mail service and they have updates on bug fixes and problems still needing to be addressed.

Apple also leverages a lot of open source work, so you can oftentimes look there for security information and/or attribute holes in Apple's OS to the open source community.

Finally, sorry, but operating systems and software are not created equal. Apple has little to say about security because they built a better boat to begin with. Microsoft has a lot more to answer for because Windows has many more security problems, many of which are considerably worse than anything Mac OS X faces.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #43 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

While Apple is fixing its mistakes and bugs, now would be a good time to restore customer goodwill by reinstating terminated services that DID work.





BRING BACK APPLE iCARDS!

http://homepage.mac.com/mac.zooks/.Pictures/bryn.png

Petitions:

http://www.PetitionOnline.com/06291970/petition.html

http://www.petitiononline.com/ic110608/petition.html


Adding a MobileMe category to Apple's feedback page would be a nice touch, too, by the way.

Two GREAT suggestions! Second.
post #44 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

What Apple did was jump into a field of service they knew nothing about and tried to rebirth it with their own vision of how web services should be.

What they should have done was partner with Google the way they partnered with AT&T and Intel.

If you think Apple knows about phones, think again. AT&T is terrible. Apple would have been smart to grab some guys from Nokia or SonyEricsson and then set about designing a phone. Right now, you have nothing more than an iPod Touch with telephony features.
post #45 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Certainly you wouldn't see the U.S.'s FBI/CIA, England's MI6/MI5/DIS, or Israel's Shabak/Massad/Aman send any of its personnel to participate or share in an open conference on security.

Actually it happens quite often. The sharing of "certain" info. They meet and great and trade war stories. The good stuff is saved for windowless rooms sitting on dampers, with piped in music, and white noise generators.
post #46 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobaby View Post

Actually it happens quite often. The sharing of "certain" info. They meet and great and trade war stories. The good stuff is saved for windowless rooms sitting on dampers, with piped in music, and white noise generators.

How is that "open?" Something isn't open if only a few people know all the details.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #47 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

How is that "open?" Something isn't open if only a few people know all the details.

They have meetings often as I stated. Meet and greets. The "other" stuff is not met in the open but is shared amongst each other behind closed doors. So, they do meet in the open but some info is not publicly stated. I thought I had caveated that.
post #48 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

I'm just fine thanks. If you read either the text next to the IE picture on the page you linked to, which I copied and bolded in my response, you'd understand why the IE icon is displayed.

MobileMe keeps a Windows user's Internet Explorer bookmarks synced between multiple computers, iPhone, and iPod touch.

Well then, if the business you're purportedly working for is cool with you checking your personal email on company time, then they should have no problem with you downloading a standards-compliant web browser so you can check your MobileMe mail. Is that your job, checking your personal email? Must be nice. You should be grateful, most people aren't so fortunate.

Indeed I'm more fortunate with the different companies I'm working for as a consultant than with Apple which refuses to refund my regularly cancelled subscription
post #49 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

So given that Apple "rarely" fess-up. You must think they aren't great, by any stretch of the imagination. Jobs only fessed up because he knew the secret approach wouldn't work this time. It's not Apple that needs to learn, it's Jobs.

From what I've seen they have had problems (though not usually on this scale) and solved those problems. Sorry if you see it differently.
post #50 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattyx26 View Post

You've got to be kidding me.

No I'm not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dattyx26 View Post

Why am I not surprised to see this kind of pro-Apple post here. AppleInsider has the most loyal Apple fans posting, doesn't it.

I'm certainly not an Apple "fanboi" by any stretch.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dattyx26 View Post

I wish they could fess up on certain hardware issues...

Like?
post #51 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Larobiade View Post

Indeed I'm more fortunate with the different companies I'm working for as a consultant than with Apple which refuses to refund my regularly cancelled subscription

Chill boy eh. No company is worth a heart attack.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #52 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

That's not a bug. MobileMe relies on open standards, which Microsoft still hasn't adhered to in Internet Explorer.

I really don't think that's an excuse, most sites apparently manage to work pretty well with IE. Not supporting IE is about as silly as it would be for them to not support iPods and iPhones under Windows.
post #53 of 76
MobileMe is Apple's answer to Vista- a distaster on so many levels. Rushed to market, dropped features, tons of bugs, poorly implemented, and overpriced.
post #54 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonefree View Post

MobileMe is Apple's answer to Vista- a distaster on so many levels. Rushed to market, dropped features, tons of bugs, poorly implemented, and overpriced.

Heh heh. Couldn't have said it better myself (hope I don't branded a 'troll').
post #55 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Larobiade View Post

In many companies, you're not allowed to install another browser than IE!

If you are using the latest version of IE or maybe 1 version older, it is possible to use mobile me. Anything older than that and you are told that it is not supported.
post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

So given that Apple "rarely" fess-up. You must think they aren't great, by any stretch of the imagination. Jobs only fessed up because he knew the secret approach wouldn't work this time. It's not Apple that needs to learn, it's Jobs.

The fessing was only done internally, right? So, the consumers who have been getting the shaft have not received a formal apology.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #57 of 76
What happened to staying silent and just blaming the users for breaking their own computers?
post #58 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobaby View Post

Actually it happens quite often. The sharing of "certain" info. They meet and great and trade war stories. The good stuff is saved for windowless rooms sitting on dampers, with piped in music, and white noise generators.

You have to be kidding. Name one publicized conference anyone of them attended.
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

The fessing was only done internally, right? So, the consumers who have been getting the shaft have not received a formal apology.

Actually I thought MobileMe customer did receive an apology (or two) as well as a 30-day extension for all of the trouble. Didn't they?

This memo sounds like a suitably internal analysis of their problems and a starting point for doing better in the future.
post #60 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I really don't think that's an excuse, most sites apparently manage to work pretty well with IE. Not supporting IE is about as silly as it would be for them to not support iPods and iPhones under Windows.

Well, if I'm wrong and Apple simply wants to, for instance, push as many MobileMe members as they can towards open, standards-compliant browsers, I won't shed a tear.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

The fessing was only done internally, right? So, the consumers who have been getting the shaft have not received a formal apology.

Got this on July 16th, 2006:

We have recently completed the transition from .Mac to MobileMe. Unfortunately, it was a lot rockier than we had hoped.

Although core services such as Mail, iDisk, Sync, Back to My Mac, and Gallery went relatively smoothly, the new MobileMe web applications had lots of problems initially. Fortunately we have worked through those problems and the web apps are now up and running.

Another snag we have run into is our use of the word "push" in describing everything under the MobileMe umbrella. While all email, contact or calendar changes on the iPhone and the web apps are immediately synced to and from the MobileMe "cloud," changes made on a PC or Mac take up to 15 minutes to sync with the cloud and your other devices. So even though things are indeed instantly pushed to and from your iPhone and the web apps today, we are going to stop using the word "push" until it is near-instant on PCs and Macs, too.

We want to apologize to our loyal customers and express our appreciation for their patience by giving all current subscribers an automatic 30-day extension to their MobileMe subscription free of charge. Your extension will be reflected in your account settings within the next few weeks.

We hope you enjoy your new suite of web applications at me.com, in addition to keeping your iPhone and iPod touch wirelessly in sync with these new web applications and your Mac or PC.

Thank you,

The MobileMe Team


I didn't have any problems that I couldn't wait to be fixed. And although I didn't expect it, I did accept the extension.

Perhaps you would like to apologize now.
post #62 of 76
@ Ireland,

I never said Apple should reinstate iCards at the expense of perfecting MobileMe "core" functions. Apple can do both.

Even if you never used iCards, they have a surprising number of very ardent fans... both those who sent them and those who received them. Members who did use them feel very strongly that Apple has done us wrong by taking away services for which WE PAID!

We were promised that MobileMe would be everything we loved about .Mac "and MORE". Instead we're getting less.

What made iCards so great in comparison to other eCard services? They were simple, they were elegant, and they didn't plaster recipients with advertisements, HTML, and flashing GIFS.

I got responses from sending iCards I never got from sending emails... not even emails with pictures. The combination of whimsical images and text in one small, savable JPEG in the iCard message was hard to resist.

Despite some less handsome alternatives, iWant Apple iCards Back!!

And in case you didn't notice, my second suggestion was that Apple set up a MobileMe feedback form on the feedback page. Several weeks ago, it eliminated the .Mac category, but DID NOT replace it with MobileMe... as if they don't want feedback from customers about the service.

This is inexcusable, and should be corrected immediately.
post #63 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonefree View Post

MobileMe is Apple's answer to Vista- a distaster on so many levels. Rushed to market, dropped features, tons of bugs, poorly implemented, and overpriced.

Right, except one of them is an ambitious service that has just launched (they did rush it and they shouldn't have launched it all at once during the unprecedented iPhone craziness) and has a reasonable $100 annual fee (it costs money because it's not supported by ads) while the other has been a total flop, cost a ridiculous amount for a multitude of largely neutered versions (except Ultimate obviously), has tons of compatibility problems, was delayed for years (it was hardly rushed to market; Apple got out two or three major retail releases of OS X in that time) and has been sitting around for nearly two years...
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #64 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

And in case you didn't notice, my second suggestion was that Apple set up a MobileMe feedback form on the feedback page. Several weeks ago, it eliminated the .Mac category, but DID NOT replace it with MobileMe... as if they don't want feedback from customers about the service.

This is inexcusable, and should be corrected immediately.

Something like this: http://www.apple.com/mobileme/status/ or this :http://www.apple.com/support/mobileme/
or this: http://discussions.apple.com/categor...categoryID=116 or this:http://www.apple.com/support/mobileme/ww/ or this: http://www.apple.com/ca/support/mobi...s_history.html or this: http://www.apple.com/support/mobileme/mailchat/
post #65 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

BRING BACK APPLE iCARDS![/URL][/B]

Interesting. Apple launches a slew of products on July 8 and get slapped all over the place because a handful of customers had a few issues connecting.

So Apple apologizes for their exuberance and gives every MobileMe user an extra month's service.

But hold it. They forgot to include iCards! Or did they? Perhaps Apple did it intentionally.

Perhaps Apple realized that iCards, that beautiful concept that they initiated back in 2000, that same product that many lambasted in the beginning and even up to its end, could in fact crash the system.

Imagine for the moment what would have happened if the million or so new iPhone 3g owners decided to send an iCard or two like the one you linked to (http://homepage.mac.com/mac.zooks/.Pictures/bryn.png

That little baby's picture was 366 KB. Imagine getting a slew of those every day in your mail and or worse, on your iPhone.

Perhaps it just made sense to hold off a bit.

P.S. When they built the first toll road, i.e., 407 Highway across the top of Toronto, they held a press conference and exuberantly proclaimed the end of traffic congestion. And just how were they going to do that. "Quite easily," they answered, "We'll just raise the tolls!"
post #66 of 76
post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

The fessing was only done internally, right? So, the consumers who have been getting the shaft have not received a formal apology.

That does be true dar. Well we did that that email I suppose.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #68 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

While Apple is fixing its mistakes and bugs, now would be a good time to restore customer goodwill by reinstating terminated services that DID work.





BRING BACK APPLE iCARDS!

http://homepage.mac.com/mac.zooks/.Pictures/bryn.png

Petitions:

http://www.PetitionOnline.com/06291970/petition.html

http://www.petitiononline.com/ic110608/petition.html


Adding a MobileMe category to Apple's feedback page would be a nice touch, too, by the way.

Oh how I miss the Apple iCards. Remember when the were free even without .Mac?
post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Right, except one of them is an ambitious service that has just launched (they did rush it and they shouldn't have launched it all at once during the unprecedented iPhone craziness) and has a reasonable $100 annual fee (it costs money because it's not supported by ads) while the other has been a total flop, cost a ridiculous amount for a multitude of largely neutered versions (except Ultimate obviously), has tons of compatibility problems, was delayed for years (it was hardly rushed to market; Apple got out two or three major retail releases of OS X in that time) and has been sitting around for nearly two years...

It's a total flop because it's now geared around the iPhone. If you don't have an iPhone who needs it? .Mac was fine as it was. The iPhone ruined it.
Put Macs back on top as your priority, Apple; not one smartphone.
post #70 of 76
Even the name sucks- MobileMe? WTF? even sounds like something Microsoft invented.
.ME- is that like as in Mac Explorer?
post #71 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

It's a total flop because it's now geared around the iPhone. If you don't have an iPhone who needs it? .Mac was fine as it was. The iPhone ruined it.

Put Macs back on top as your priority, Apple; not one smartphone.

How is making .Mac compatible with the iPhone and iPod touch and introducing much more desktop-like web apps in addition to 20GB of online storage, Back To My Mac remote control, and one click iWeb publishing "ruining" the service? .Mac/MobileMe's main job is to keep everything in sync across multiple Macs. Whether or not you (or Apple) want to admit it, the iPhone is an ultra-portable, WiFi enabled, touch-based Mac that runs the same core OS.

At the same time, I don't quite understand the constantly repeated notion that Apple is leaving Mac users behind. They released Leopard and introduced that sleek, aluminum iMac with a sleek new keyboard last year and at Macworld this past January they introduced the MacBook Air, one of the most futuristic, yet durable computers they've ever made. We've all heard the essentially confirmed rumors about a major hardware transition coming this fall. What about their acquisition of PA Semi, which will be creating custom system-on-chip and supporting chips for Macs that will widen the gap between them and the competition in ways Dell, HP, etc. won't be able to easily replicate? And Snow Leopard promises to take advantage of Intel's processors (and whatever PA Semi puts out), natively supporting push services and overall optimizations that will make the operating system's footprint smaller.

What Apple learns from the iPhone, they will use to improve Macs and vice versa. These platforms aren't going off in different, disconnected directions, but advancing together to create a more and more seamless experience.
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #72 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

While Apple is fixing its mistakes and bugs, now would be a good time to restore customer goodwill by reinstating terminated services that DID work.





BRING BACK APPLE iCARDS!

http://homepage.mac.com/mac.zooks/.Pictures/bryn.png

Petitions:

http://www.PetitionOnline.com/06291970/petition.html

http://www.petitiononline.com/ic110608/petition.html


Adding a MobileMe category to Apple's feedback page would be a nice touch, too, by the way.



I agree, wholeheartedly, with your suggestion to reinstate iCards. It was a small, but frequently used, service...used by more folks than Apple probably realizes.

As for MobileMe, if the problem-ridden launch of MobileMe serves to humble an amazing company a bit, well, then, that may be a good thing. As well, it was probably unrealistic for early adopters of MobileMe to expect that everything would be hitting on all cylinders, from the open bell. We hope, but most of us know better.

At the end of the day...Apple--think of your customer more often than you think of profit margin. Apple product users--we're here because we know, when all is said and done, Apple builds exciting products. Celebrate, today, what works well, and, while holding Apple accountable to their marketing promises, exercise some patience as they work out through the challenges. And, if you want seamless performance, then wait until a service has been up and running for a period of time, before you surrender your hard-earned money.

For those of us already with .Mac, it's all about patience and feedback.
post #73 of 76

Except for the Chat Support, most of these links are for one-way communications from Apple to the customer, not feedback channels. The chat support people, by the way, didn't know that iCards were gone, either.

I'm talking about the usual page for feedback, where customers normally tell Apple what's on their minds:

http://www.apple.com/feedback/

Where the .Mac form has been removed, understandably, but where's the MobileMe icon which, if it were there, would pop up a feedback FORM (not forum) like the feedback forms for the other products??

Meanwhile, the Discussions forums have been heavily censored. One thread after another about this topic was taken down by the moderators... and that after each comment was chopped up by editing. They fudged the view numbers while they were at it, too, dropping the numbers from one day to the next.

Somehow, one thread escaped the moderator's notice... It had over 280 posts before they deleted it. More people have been angered by this than you realize. And who can blame them, when they go to the previous iCards location, expecting to send an iCard for someone they care about on a day they care about, and all they get is a MobileMe error page!?? (Hard to believe, but not everyone lives in these forums and checks for Apple news every half hour.)

Apple just put up this page, almost a whole month after they took down the service:

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2665

It just showed up in a Google search for the first time for me.

The advice to use Apple's Stationery is not sufficient. I'm running Tiger, but posts which got deleted said the stationery in Leopard was nowhere near what iCards used to be. And the advice to go to other greeting cards services is an insulting slap in the face. If there were eCard services elsewhere which were any better than Apple's, we'd already be using them. We use Macs because they're superior to any other computer. Likewise, we sent iCards, because they were superior to anything other eCard service on the web.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

But hold it. They forgot to include iCards! Or did they? Perhaps Apple did it intentionally.

Of course Apple did this intentionally. Almost everything Apple does is deliberate.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

That little baby's picture was 366 KB. Imagine getting a slew of those every day in your mail and or worse, on your iPhone.

You just proved my point about the superiority of iCards, because that card I made with my grandbaby's photo was NOT an iCard. It's a homemade card using PostCard. iCards, on the other hand, were much lighter files. The entire email with the embedded iCard image averaged around 60 KB, no problem for an average iPhone that can load entire real webpages.
post #74 of 76
"It was a mistake to launch MobileMe at the same time as iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software and the App Store," Jobs said.

WELL NO SHIT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #75 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post

You just proved my point about the superiority of iCards, because that card I made with my grandbaby's photo was NOT an iCard. It's a homemade card using PostCard. iCards, on the other hand, were much lighter files. The entire email with the embedded iCard image averaged around 60 KB, no problem for an average iPhone that can load entire real webpages.

I just retrieved an iCard that I got a couple of years ago and it was 228 KB.

However, you are right that it is not a problem for an average iPhone that can load entire real webpages.

However, remember that you could make custom iCards. As such, they can be quite large depending on the image type and size.

My point was it wasn't the size of the file, but the effect of what millions of such files could have on the servers. Remember that with the exception of a few other countries, the US is virtually the only one providing unlimited data (for now).

I do know that in the beginning, (I signed up on Jan 6, 2000) there were a slew of complaints that chastized iCards because of the problems PCrs had opening their emails. I used it early in the game, however, I got more complaints than accolades. Simply put, people, particularly in business were getting too much junk mail as it was and this just created excessive delay and unnecessary fluff.

Apple, for whatever reason, removed iCards. They have every right to do so as the legal policies in the contractual agreement on purchase stipulates. And you have every right to ask why. I would think that if the demand was great enough it would be brought back. However, if there was one reason why not to, it may be for the same issues that surrounds text messaging. Again not the size of the file but the astonishing numbers of them, and the consequential demand on carriers to store, manage and distribute the massive bulk.
post #76 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

I just retrieved an iCard that I got a couple of years ago and it was 228 KB.

I see your experience goes back to the early days of iTools. Evidently Apple fixed the problem of large files crashing the system and file compatibility with Windows. It's too bad you didn't check back on iCards all these years. You missed out on a splendid and enjoyable service.

I bought my iMac and joined .Mac in 2002. (Click for story.) I sent my very first iCard 11/21/2002, and the entire email is a whopping 32.2 KB.

This is a custom icard made with my own photo of a female mallard duck which did not survive an encounter with a red fox:
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSmiley View Post


The iCard itself is 44.7 KB. Apple converted the image when making the iCard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

My point was it wasn't the size of the file, but the effect of what millions of such files could have on the servers.

Apple didn't need iCards to bring down the MobileMe system. That's exactly what Steve's made-to-be-leaked email reveals. A million new customers crashed the mail system, most of whom knew little about iCards in the first place, all the while Apple was rolling out too much too soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

I do know that in the beginning, (I signed up on Jan 6, 2000) there were a slew of complaints that chastized iCards because of the problems PCrs had opening their emails. I used it early in the game, however, I got more complaints than accolades.

Sorry there was trouble in the early days. My experience has been the exact opposite. ALL ACCOLADES, and ZERO complaints. Most of my recipients have been Windows PC users. They loved getting iCards.

As far as corporate policies, the battle has been with virus-infected attachments, malicious HTML mail, and links to malware. iCards merely got lost in the shuffle of corporate IT clamp-downs. They were never the direct cause.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Apple, for whatever reason, removed iCards. They have every right to do... And you have every right to ask why.

AMEN!
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