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Apple poised for special event this September - Page 6

post #201 of 312
Seriously, no one knows has any real idea of when it is going to be, other than "between september 1 and 30". Maybe by the end of august there will be real hints and guesses.

The wait for this thing is killing me. My MBP was stolen in late June (just got the 2k insurance check, thank god) and the timing actually worked out surprisingly conveniently... but this is going to take forever. And the bad part of the wait isn't even close.
post #202 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Why would a consensus of people who don't know anything matter?

By that logic, why are you even in this forum? None of us really know anything, yet we speculate about the future of Apple's products for the hell of it. I was just wondering if people's guesses centered around a certain scenario based on information that we do know. I realize anyone truly "in the know" wouldn't be able to say anything or be lurking around on a board like this...
post #203 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post



Back to whether the tapered edges and wide bezels are strictly necessary or not:

Mel, do you think that the Air's edges could be slightly less tapered and the bezels made smaller without the Air getting any thicker? I heavily doubt that - if Apple could have hit the same thickness whilst having smaller bezels, surely they would have - it would have made for a lighter machine after all.

It seems to me that Steve has this unfortunate obsession with extreme thinness. There's a point where making your product thinner forces compromises elsewhere that aren't worth it. I agree with you that it would be nice if the bezels of the Air were smaller. I think the reason that they are not smaller is that that would have forced the Air to be thicker and it's a shame they didn't choose to make that compromise.

I do think so, yes. It isn't the taper, but that the taper goes on further than required for the actual device. There's one reason for it.

I've now seen several of these takedowns, and I've yet to see anything at the edges that is other than a wire, or some thin, small item that couldn't have been put further inside, even if by a quarter inch. They could have rounded out the edges more if they clipped off the outer quarter inch or so without compromising it at all.

This was done purely for the looks, and we all know it. It's for "talking points".

There is no purpose for the extreme thinness at the edges other than for that.
post #204 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

HOW!? Sheesh, I responded to the entirety of your post and you can't give me an example?

Maybe it's your perspective that's warped here.

Because you're not really responding to what I'm saying, except in an oblique way.

Quote:
Whew, blowing my mind.

If we agree, how am I "warping everything" and you're not?

*cough* backpedalling *cough*

This an example of what I mean.

You're saying that the computer can be held by the hinge side, so its shape is fine for that, and that's how we should handle it.

I'm not arguing with what you say about holding it from the hinge side. That'e perfactly fine.

I'm talking about the other sides, as I made quite clear. But, you ignore that, and talk about the hinge side, as did your defender.

And by the way, the shape isn't that of a teardrop, it's that of a wedge, which neither of you seem to realize.

That's why I didn't respond to your comments again, there was no point.
post #205 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Why would a consensus of people who don't know anything matter?

That's a point not often understood here.
post #206 of 312
September, dang to late for me.

Nice to see new case designs but I don't expect a 15' Macbook or anything like that , the ranges will stay pretty much the same. I think.
post #207 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This an example of what I mean.

You're saying that the computer can be held by the hinge side, so its shape is fine for that, and that's how we should handle it.

I'm not arguing with what you say about holding it from the hinge side. That'e perfactly fine.

I'm talking about the other sides, as I made quite clear. But, you ignore that, and talk about the hinge side, as did your defender.

I both responded to each of your hypothesized carrying issues and thoroughly detailed why they don't matter. That's not ignoring, that's proving your statements to be meaningless and then reiterating what a normal, sane person would do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

And by the way, the shape isn't that of a teardrop, it's that of a wedge, which neither of you seem to realize.

When most people think wedge they think of a wedge of cheese, or one of those wooden, triangular prism-shaped doorstops. Wedges generally aren't rounded all over, nor do they feature tapering, but straight, hard lines and a flat "back" end.





Of course, I'm not the only one who recognizes the Air as teardrop shaped. Just Google MacBook Air teardrop and you'll see. Even AppleInsider found that Wired described it as such just before the Air debuted at Macworld:

"In its description, the magazine's Gadget Lab blog describes the lightweight notebook as teardrop-shaped when shut, thickening towards the hinge of the system but thinning near the edges -- and remaining "unbelievably" thin overall, according to the source"

I even went into photoshop for you:

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post #208 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

I both responded to each of your hypothesized carrying issues and thoroughly detailed why they don't matter. That's not ignoring, that's proving your statements to be meaningless and then reiterating what a normal, sane person would do.



When most people think wedge they think of a wedge of cheese, or one of those wooden, triangular prism-shaped doorstops. Wedges generally aren't rounded all over, nor do they feature tapering, but straight, hard lines and a flat "back" end.





Of course, I'm not the only one who recognizes the Air as teardrop shaped. Just Google MacBook Air teardrop and you'll see. Even AppleInsider found that Wired described it as such just before the Air debuted at Macworld:

"In its description, the magazine's Gadget Lab blog describes the lightweight notebook as teardrop-shaped when shut, thickening towards the hinge of the system but thinning near the edges -- and remaining "unbelievably" thin overall, according to the source"

I even went into photoshop for you:


This is getting silly. no matter what you say, you still don't understand a thing i've said, nor do you respond to it. All you seem capable of doing is taking one word, and expanding your silliness over it.

No, it;s not a perfect wedge design. But it's not a teardrop either, less so than a wedge, no matter what someone from a site, who knows no more about it than you do claims.

It looks nothing than that blue object you drew, which itself is not a teardrop as you seem to think it is.

Since you've missed the entire point I've clearly made several times, it's obvious that this discussion should come to an end.
post #209 of 312
Just call it a teardrop dude.
post #210 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This is getting silly. no matter what you say, you still don't understand a thing i've said, nor do you respond to it. All you seem capable of doing is taking one word, and expanding your silliness over it.

You're really testing my patience. I'm pretty sure I understand your points perfectly. While you believe the Air's hinged-end is fine for carrying, you think its left side, right side, and latch-end are tapered enough that they would be uncomfortable for carrying under your arm. I've both acknowledged your concerns and explained why, while they do exist, they are of no consequence because anyone with a brain and nerve endings in their hand will do what's natural, what's comfortable: hinged-end in palm, latch-end up towards the armpit.

Don't know how what I've said is silly, warped, or any other vague descriptor you don't seem interested in clarifying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No, it;s not a perfect wedge design. But it's not a teardrop either, less so than a wedge, no matter what someone from a site, who knows no more about it than you do claims.

Sorry, but classifying the Air as a classic wedge really isn't accurate. Wedges generally have straight lines and a larger "back." The Air is much too thin, and its hinged-end doesn't form a 90º angle with the ground. Wedges usually aren't tapered all over either as they do have a purpose: wedging things open.

The Air is much closer to a teardrop shape, which has no real straight lines, a curved back, and slopes down to a point.

I gave one example of someone describing it as such and suggested looking it up in Google. If you're unwilling to search, here are some more examples:

1. "What may be the most talked about of Apple's four major product releases Steve Jobs introduced today is a new addition to the MacBook line called the MacBook Air. With a teardrop profile only 0.76 inches at its thickest point, it's the thinnest notebook computer ever.""

2. "The last big announcement at Macworld 2008 was Apple's new laptop, the MacBook Air, an expansion of its current MacBook and MacBook Pro line. The new MacBook Air is unlike any other laptop ever made. A commercial being released next week will show off the MacBook Air's three-pound weight by easily sliding the laptop into an inter-office envelope. It has a tear-drop profile and is only about one-eighth of an inch thick in the front and three-fourths of an inch in the back. The screen and keyboard are the same size as the current MacBook with the added benefit of backlit keys for low-light conditions, similar to those of a cell phone."

3. "Case Design
The Powerbook is a finely-designed notebook, but the Macbook Air quite simply puts it to shame. Despite its petite frame, the Air feels like one solid piece of aluminum holding it, an expertly-carved teardrop."


There were forum results too, but I won't quote those as they aren't "real" sources.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It looks nothing than that blue object you drew, which itself is not a teardrop as you seem to think it is.

I didn't draw that teardrop. I looked up teardrop shape in Google Images and found it in on the second or third page of results in an online Photoshop guide for making custom shapes, in this case a teardrop shape. Look it up yourself or you can go straight to the guide here:
http://www.52photoshop.net/photoshop_tutorial_3.html

Again, we're talking about the side-view with the lid closed. If you can't see that, I suggest you get some new bifocals.

Here are some more teardrops from that guide:


That blue one on the far right is a good example.
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post #211 of 312
Does it really matter?

Anyway, be nice to see some clearer confirmation of an event in September. Just one analysts opinion at the moment. (though saying that probably will be September, knowing my luck. I need updates before the end of August!)
post #212 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

You're really testing my patience.

Welcome to AppleInsider!

Obviously you've not noticed how Melgross will never, ever admit to being wrong.

On the shape front, yes, the MacBook Air is more teardrop shaped than wedge shaped, but it's not really important so I suggest people stop arguing about it.

On the "which edge is it most comfortable to carry the Air by?" front, it's now clear that you both agree that carrying it at the hinge end is comfortable, but carrying it by any other edge is likely not to be so comfortable. Melgross thinks that this is important, you don't.
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post #213 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

You're really testing my patience. I'm pretty sure I understand your points perfectly. While you believe the Air's hinged-end is fine for carrying, you think its left side, right side, and latch-end are tapered enough that they would be uncomfortable for carrying under your arm. I've both acknowledged your concerns and explained why, while they do exist, they are of no consequence because anyone with a brain and nerve endings in their hand will do what's natural, what's comfortable: hinged-end in palm, latch-end up towards the armpit.

It's not your patience that been tested. This is really the first time you've actually responded, in part, and in a direct way.

It's fine if we don't agree, as long as we understand what each other is saying.

Quote:
Don't know how what I've said is silly, warped, or any other vague descriptor you don't seem interested in clarifying.

I did clarify it, and you've now partly responded.

Quote:
Sorry, but classifying the Air as a classic wedge really isn't accurate. Wedges generally have straight lines and a larger "back." The Air is much too thin, and its hinged-end doesn't form a 90º angle with the ground. Wedges usually aren't tapered all over either as they do have a purpose: wedging things open.

The Air is much closer to a teardrop shape, which has no real straight lines, a curved back, and slopes down to a point.

I gave one example of someone describing it as such and suggested looking it up in Google. If you're unwilling to search, here are some more examples:

1. "What may be the most talked about of Apple's four major product releases Steve Jobs introduced today is a new addition to the MacBook line called the MacBook Air. With a teardrop profile only 0.76 inches at its thickest point, it's the thinnest notebook computer ever.""

2. "The last big announcement at Macworld 2008 was Apple's new laptop, the MacBook Air, an expansion of its current MacBook and MacBook Pro line. The new MacBook Air is unlike any other laptop ever made. A commercial being released next week will show off the MacBook Air's three-pound weight by easily sliding the laptop into an inter-office envelope. It has a tear-drop profile and is only about one-eighth of an inch thick in the front and three-fourths of an inch in the back. The screen and keyboard are the same size as the current MacBook with the added benefit of backlit keys for low-light conditions, similar to those of a cell phone."

3. "Case Design
The Powerbook is a finely-designed notebook, but the Macbook Air quite simply puts it to shame. Despite its petite frame, the Air feels like one solid piece of aluminum holding it, an expertly-carved teardrop."


There were forum results too, but I won't quote those as they aren't "real" sources.



I didn't draw that teardrop. I looked up teardrop shape in Google Images and found it in on the second or third page of results in an online Photoshop guide for making custom shapes, in this case a teardrop shape. Look it up yourself or you can go straight to the guide here:
http://www.52photoshop.net/photoshop_tutorial_3.html

Again, we're talking about the side-view with the lid closed. If you can't see that, I suggest you get some new bifocals.

Here are some more teardrops from that guide:


That blue one on the far right is a good example.

Except that none of that truely describes the shape.

The truth is that its neither, as you put it a "classic" wedge OR teardrop. But, despite people who don't seem to know what a teardrop looks like, or a wedge, it does look more like a wedge. The hinge is rounded, but that in itself doesn't affect the overall shape.

Look, this is going on far too long. I'm more than willing to call it a draw, and go on to other things.
post #214 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's not your patience that been tested. This is really the first time you've actually responded, in part, and in a direct way.

It's fine if we don't agree, as long as we understand what each other is saying.

While I beg to differ about my patience, I thought my earlier responses here and here were pretty direct. I explained things in greater detail at the beginning, but as the discussion progressed, I began leaving out any points that we both obviously agreed upon. That's how a Hegelian dialectic works; when you find common ground, you move to the next conflict. I apologize if I gave you the impression that I was ignoring your points. \

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Except that none of that truely describes the shape.

The truth is that its neither, as you put it a "classic" wedge OR teardrop. But, despite people who don't seem to know what a teardrop looks like, or a wedge, it does look more like a wedge. The hinge is rounded, but that in itself doesn't affect the overall shape.

Ah, now we're making progress. Didn't mean to imply that describing the Air as a wedge was completely out of left field. Both shapes share a number of attributes. It's like a parallelogram vs. a rectangle. Given a picture of a slice of Swiss cheese or your average wooden doorstop and then given a picture of an elongated teardrop like those I posted, I'd say a majority would pick the latter as being a better representation of the Air's very thin, tapered, sloping frame.

From other points of reference, most would call it a rectangle as its hinged-end is only about half an inch thicker than the latch-end:


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Look, this is going on far too long. I'm more than willing to call it a draw, and go on to other things.

No one's forcing you to respond, are they?
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post #215 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Welcome to AppleInsider!

Obviously you've not noticed how Melgross will never, ever admit to being wrong.

On the shape front, yes, the MacBook Air is more teardrop shaped than wedge shaped, but it's not really important so I suggest people stop arguing about it.

On the "which edge is it most comfortable to carry the Air by?" front, it's now clear that you both agree that carrying it at the hinge end is comfortable, but carrying it by any other edge is likely not to be so comfortable. Melgross thinks that this is important, you don't.

I admit when I'm wrong. This is an opinion. Neither of us is actually wrong. It's just a matter of trying to convince the other of your own thoughts.

A lot of this is in the eye of the beholder. Macworld's description is this:

Quote:
The device has a slightly wedge-shaped profile.

http://www.macworld.com/article/1315...acbookair.html

Another:

Quote:
In profile, MacBook Air is a wedge

http://www.macintouch.com/reviews/macbookair/

Again:

Quote:
the wedge shaped MacBook Air

http://digital-lifestyles.info/2008/...omised-beauty/

Another one:

Quote:
. The Air sports a wedge design

http://mac-book-air-reviews.blogspot...e-release.html

Guess what?

Quote:
the MacBook Air has an unusual wedge profile

http://www.wired.com/gadgets/mac/new...world_products

If you go to Google search and type; Macbook Air wedge, you will have 28,600 hits. Obviously, I'm not going to list an example from them all.

If you type Macbook Air teardrop, you get 23,000. Still an awful lot.

I'll stick with my description of it as a wedge.
post #216 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Ah, now we're making progress. Didn't mean to imply that describing the Air as a wedge was completely out of left field. Both shapes share a number of attributes. It's like a parallelogram vs. rectangle. Given a picture of a slice of Swiss cheese or your average wooden doorstop and then given a picture of an elongated teardrop like those I posted, I'd say a majority would pick the latter as being a better representation of the Air's very thin, tapered, sloping frame.

From other points of reference, most would call it a rectangle as its hinged-end is only about half an inch larger than the latch-end:

Satisfactory.

Quote:
No one's forcing you to respond, are they?

Or you.
post #217 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Satisfactory.

Good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Or you.

Obviously not.

You sounded frantic. I wanted to make sure nobody was holding a gun to your head.

/sarcasm
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post #218 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Good.



Obviously not.

You sounded frantic. I wanted to make sure nobody was holding a gun to your head.

/sarcasm

Not frantic, just annoyed. But that's over with.
post #219 of 312
i dunno im kinda with wob on this one mel i think you might have not been thinking about the air without the screen closed?
post #220 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machead99 View Post

Just call it a teardrop dude.

Agreed. It's a teardrop shape.

Boy it's heated in here.
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post #221 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerfman View Post

i dunno im kinda with wob on this one mel i think you might have not been thinking about the air without the screen closed?

and
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Agreed. It's a teardrop shape.

Boy it's heated in here.

Where were you guys when I needed you?
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post #222 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I admit when I'm wrong.

I've never seen it happen. And I've been reading AppleInsider threads for a long time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This is an opinion.

On the question of whether "wedge" or "teardrop" better describe the shape, I agree that it is neither wholly wedge shaped or wholly teardrop shaped. I suggest that it would be possible to objectively measure which shape the Air is closest to, but this would be time consuming and not worth the effort.

I had previously thought it was obviously more like a teardrop, but your post suggests otherwise. Touché
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post #223 of 312
How about we talk about when Apple might schedule this event now..
post #224 of 312
My complete guess is the 16th. It's a Tuesday and the day after the ipod rebate offer ends.
post #225 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by solsun View Post

Thats definitely not a 2003 Powerbook G4. The original PowerBook G4's (titanium) had black keyboards, plus Garageband didn't exist in 2003.

At any rate, I understand that the color has always been the same, but everything else has changed. It has been redesigned many times.

Wrong re. 2003 Powerbook G4. That is a G4 PB 17" (on the right) and was announced/released january 2003. I know because I'm still working on mine. Garage Band showed up later with upgrades to the OS - currently running Leopard on my baby. Notice the "feet" on the G4 - anyone who had a G4 PB could tell you about them falling off.
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post #226 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by ByronVanArsdale View Post

Wrong re. 2003 Powerbook G4. That is a G4 PB 17" (on the right) and was announced/released january 2003. I know because I'm still working on mine. Garage Band showed up later with upgrades to the OS - currently running Leopard on my baby. Notice the "feet" on the G4 - anyone who had a G4 PB could tell you about them falling off.

guess you didn't read too much of the thread before replying? Please, let's not beat that dead horse any more (yes, you're right, BTW).
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post #227 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowayout11 View Post

My complete guess is the 16th. It's a Tuesday and the day after the ipod rebate offer ends.

That makes sense. Originally I was expecting/hoping something would happen beginning of August, but, well, that didn't happen. So mid September now seems like the most realistic expectation. Still quite a wait
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post #228 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

I've never seen it happen. And I've been reading AppleInsider threads for a long time.

Well, then you've missed a lot. I've been defended about this before.

Quote:
On the question of whether "wedge" or "teardrop" better describe the shape, I agree that it is neither wholly wedge shaped or wholly teardrop shaped. I suggest that it would be possible to objectively measure which shape the Air is closest to, but this would be time consuming and not worth the effort.

I had previously thought it was obviously more like a teardrop, but your post suggests otherwise. Touché

I'm just going by the fact that a teardrop has concave sides (sucked in, as the pictures of teardrops on this thread have shown) moving up the drop to the point, whereas a wedge has convex, straight, or multi-angled sides (ballooned out) moving up to the point. That's a big difference. Many wedges don't have straight sides, and many have rounded ends.

The Air isn't a teardrop, as most writers have understood, as they have called it a wedge, because the view from the side isn't concave, it's convex.

Look carefully at the pictures of the teardrops, esp, the thinner ones. Where would the computer go inside a case like that?
post #229 of 312
seriously your argument is that it isn't concave....... ???wow. well actually for your information wedges almost always have one flat side for example a door wedge. and that difference i think is greater than the "Oh no its not concave".

"The Air isn't a teardrop, as most writers have understood"
your right the masses are always right /sarcasm

while you are right it isn't a perfect tear drop its pretty darn close and it does look a lot like that classic shape
and the deffinition as stated on dictionary.com is
"having a globular form at the bottom, tapering to a point at the top."
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/teardrop
post #230 of 312
PS i have decided to creat a new thread it will be titled " is the Macbook air teardrop or wedge shaped?"
please continue over there and we can continue what this thread is about.
post #231 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerfman View Post

PS i have decided to creat a new thread it will be titled " is the Macbook air teardrop or wedge shaped?"
please continue over there and we can continue what this thread is about.

Thank you, thank you, a thousand times thank you. My eyes were starting to bleed from all this nonsense ...
post #232 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerfman View Post

seriously your argument is that it isn't concave....... ???wow. well actually for your information wedges almost always have one flat side for example a door wedge. and that difference i think is greater than the "Oh no its not concave".

"The Air isn't a teardrop, as most writers have understood"
your right the masses are always right /sarcasm

while you are right it isn't a perfect tear drop its pretty darn close and it does look a lot like that classic shape
and the deffinition as stated on dictionary.com is
"having a globular form at the bottom, tapering to a point at the top."
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/teardrop

Thank you. Gosh, if I had started with the dictionary this could have been settled a while back.

The argument that "most writers" have described it as a wedge isn't backed up by anything. It's not that big a deal, but let's be honest here. If we're going stickily by the "credential-ed" writers, it's around half and half for both. Adding in forum posts probably just amplifies the numbers. If we go simply by what's in this thread, there's a majority who think it's teardrop-shaped. Depends on what metric you wanna use or believe.
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post #233 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Thank you. Gosh, if I had started with the dictionary this could have been settled a while back.

The argument that "most writers" have described it as a wedge isn't backed up by anything. It's not that big a deal, but let's be honest here. If we're going stickily by the "credential-ed" writers, it's around half and half for both. Adding in forum posts probably just amplifies the numbers. If we go simply by what's in this thread, there's a majority who think it's teardrop-shaped. Depends on what metric you wanna use or believe.


ENOUGH! Take it to the other thread ...
post #234 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by mahk View Post

ENOUGH! Take it to the other thread ...

Sorry, enough's enough. I'm done.
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post #235 of 312
Does anyone think that the current Macbook Pro laptops will drop in price when the new ones come out?
Thanks!
post #236 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redtail View Post

Does anyone think that the current Macbook Pro laptops will drop in price when the new ones come out?

They do end up on clearance, but you have to nab one before it's gone, sometimes they are hard to find.
post #237 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerfman View Post

seriously your argument is that it isn't concave....... ???wow. well actually for your information wedges almost always have one flat side for example a door wedge. and that difference i think is greater than the "Oh no its not concave".

"The Air isn't a teardrop, as most writers have understood"
your right the masses are always right /sarcasm

while you are right it isn't a perfect tear drop its pretty darn close and it does look a lot like that classic shape
and the deffinition as stated on dictionary.com is
"having a globular form at the bottom, tapering to a point at the top."
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/teardrop

Go back to sleep.
post #238 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I thought the Macbooks are polycarbonate.
But the tit. shell was much thinner than the aluminum shell, and so the alum. shell is stiffer.

The Tit. models were not stiff at all, and that was a major problem with them.

Ya gotta use a differnet abbreviation! Ti works. "Tit" combined with "stiff" is just.....wrong. Or right. Just saying'....

Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

Why would a consensus of people who don't know anything matter?

Because crowds are smart! Haven't you read Wired? They say it every six issues, so it must be true!

Okay, so the fascinating shape-fight is over? So, what tearwedge-shaped goodies might we see at the proposed event?
post #239 of 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jouster View Post

So, what tearwedge-shaped goodies might we see at the proposed event?

Redesigned MacBook Pro with tapered edges, LED backlit display, magnetic latch, black backlit keyboard, oversized Air-like Multi-Touch trackpad, maybe an optional SSD, and a long, narrow, removable battery that, when removed, gives access to the hard drive bay (as seen in the spy shots).

If the MacBook is updated the same day, I'm predicting a similar tapered-edge facelift, but it'll retain its polycarbonate black and white plastic material. An SSD option is less likely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jouster View Post

Okay, so the fascinating shape-fight is over?

Pretty much, but make sure to participate in the nerdy goodness of zerfman's MacBook Air Teardrop vs. Wedge Poll
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #240 of 312
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Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Go back to sleep.

ha, wait now you have convinced me. good point.....
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