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Inside iPhone 2.0: MobileMe Push Messaging

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
Here's a look at how Apple transformed its .Mac service into MobileMe and why the launch failed so spectacularly. In a followup segment, we'll dive deeper into how MobileMe works, how it compares to competing services, how the service delivers push messaging to the iPhone 2.0 software, and whether it's worth the annual subscription price.

Inside iPhone 2.0: the new iPhone 3G Hardware (Last Thursday)
Inside iPhone 2.0: iPhone 3G vs. other smartphones (Last Friday)
Inside iPhone 2.0: the new iPhone 3G Software (Monday)
Inside iPhone 2.0:Â*iPhone OS vs. other mobile platforms (Tuesday)
Inside iPhone 2.0: the new iPhone App Store (Yesterday)
Inside iPhone 2.0: MobileMe push messaging (Today)

The new push messaging architecture in iPhone 2.0 is second in importance and relevance only to the Apps Store and the third party development behind it. Apple announced push messaging initially as being support for Exchange Server 2007 via ActiveSync, Microsoft's push messaging system that the company is advancing in an effort to steamroll RIM's BlackBerry Enterprise Server. However, just prior to the release of iPhone 2.0, Apple also unveiled its own push messaging service: MobileMe.

The origins of MobileMe

MobileMe is a rebranding of .Mac, which originally started out under the name iTools. Apple launched the original iTools service as a free internet services package at Macworld Expo in 2000. It included an email account, online storage, and access to a variety of web apps, including HomePage, a way to design simple web pages without knowing any HTML.Â*

The iTools package was intended to provide workplace-style networking services to users of Apple's Mac computers, in part to offset the removal of floppy drives that had started with the 1998 iMac, and in general to differentiate Apple's computers and create a sense of community among Mac users (below). The original package also included KidSafe, a selection of web sites, and iReview, a website rating service, both of which were subsequently dropped.

Two and a half years later, in mid 2002, Apple relaunched the service under the .Mac name and with an annual subscription fee. It added an online backup service and some new online web apps, including a way to create photo postcard emails from Apple's own stock photography or users' own photos. Apple also upgraded its online file servers to use the WebDAV standard, making it easier to share online files between Mac and Windows PC users.



The incremental progress of .Mac

Over the next half decade, Apple only introduced incremental advances to .Mac, leaving observers to wonder out loud why Apple wasn't chasing the brass ring of social networking or otherwise developing upon its .Mac services with the clear and obvious strategy that permeated the iPod, iTunes, Mac OS X, Mac hardware, or the company's retail efforts. Instead, the company pushed out regular but minor enhancements that slowly connected .Mac with its other services. For example:Â*
In early 2005, Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger was released with a Sync Services architecture that integrated with .Mac, allowing developers to sync their application's settings and data between a subscriber's computers. Â*
In October 2005, Apple introduced certificate-based encryption for iChat instant messaging for its .Mac users.
At Macworld Expo in 2006, Apple introduced a new version of iLife with iWeb, a desktop client tool for publishing web content to .Mac. The new iPhoto 6 also included a feature called Photocasting, for sharing an RSS photo feed with friends, who could also upload their own photos to albums.Â*
In October 2006, Apple released a new and improved AJAX webmail client for .Mac users.
In August 2007, Apple unveiled Web GalleryÂ*(below) as a .Mac feature to make it easier for users of the new iLife 08 suite to publish their photos and movies on the web, billing it as an alternative to burning DVDs for family and friends.
In October 2007, Apple released Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard with support for Back to My Mac, which registered .Mac-linked computers with Apple's Dynamic DNS to enable subscribes to access locally shared files on their home system while traveling.


.Mac becomes MobileMe

All of these services provided home users with capabilities commonly associated with business networks. It was therefore, in retrospect, a natural progression for Apple to announce this spring that .Mac would expand to include push email, calendar, and contact messaging features commonly associated with Exchange Server. Since this functionality was being aimed toward iPhone users, Apple removed the Mac-centric branding and launched the new services under a new name that suggested personal mobile networking features: MobileMe.

Apple also quietly dropped some features from .Mac that were not very popular, including .Mac Groups, intended as a community space for subscribers to collaborate. While existing groups will continue to work, it is no longer possible to set up new groups under MobileMe. The .Mac iCards and .Mac Slides Publisher, which converted photos into email postcards and a screensaver, respectively, are also missing from MobileMe.Â*

At one point, .Mac also bundled in a copy of McAfee Virex, although there were no viruses on the Mac for it to find. The buggy utility was finally yanked after it caused widespread problems. Apple also shipped its own Backup program, aimed at allowing users to regularly copy their files to their iDisk for safekeeping. However, Apple's Backup is at least as unreliable as Virex, and while it is still offered for download, it makes far more sense to backup files using Time Machine or simply manually copy them to an external drive on regular basis.

Most of MobileMe's services also now require at least Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, although its standard IMAP email, iDisk, and iWeb publishing still work on Mac OS X 10.3 Panther. MobileMe also introduced a new me.com domain, but existing .Mac uses will continue to be able to use both domains for email, iChat, and existing web URLs will continue to work.

On page 2 of 2: Things go awry; and Failure at launch.

Things go awry

Apple's stage rehearsal for the MobileMe launch occurred last fall with the rollout of the .Mac Web Gallery. That launch went smoothly, as it only added new features for the existing couple million .Mac users without causing any impact on their existing services. There were likely only a minority of .Mac users who even gave Web Gallery a cursory examination, and the media didn't focus much attention on the new product offering. However, it would serve as Apple's first public web app based on SproutCore, which was later used to develop the companion apps that make up MobileMe.

Unlike the Web Gallery introduction, the new MobileMe apps entirely replaced the existing .Mac web mail, the Address Book online contacts, online Bookmarks, and the file download site. It also introduced a new web calendar and upgraded the Web Gallery.Â*

Additionally, MobileMe was advertised in conjunction with the iPhone 3G launch and sold as a companion product to provide push messaging for the new phone. The new web apps, new iPhone 2.0 software, new demand, and the monumental transition were all hit by a series of problems that resulted in a spectacular launch crisis overshadowed only by the activation meltdown of the iPhone 3G itself.Â*

Failure at launch

Apple shut down its web mail services on .Mac before the new MobileMe apps were accessible, failed to accommodate the rush of traffic from users curious about the new apps, and even lost some users' emails during the transition. Other users experienced sync issues ranging from minor to serious, and even a couple weeks after the MobileMe launch, Apple's new online apps were still often sluggish to access.Â*



The tech media gleefully jumped on the offensive, accusing Apple of lying about its push messaging after deciding that "push messaging" required desktop client apps to also push up updates instantly. Push messaging usually refers to updates being sent from the server to a mobile device, but Apple's marketing suggested that MobileMe would also push messages to desktop clients in real time (rather than just regularly syncing them). Apple apologized for overstating the service's new features and said it would stop referring to the service as push until data could be pushed in both directions to and from desktop apps.

A big part of the launch problem was that Apple advertised the service too effectively, informing Joe Sixpack as to why he'd want push. That in turn created a mob that demanded the new service act as flawlessly as it appeared to in Apple's marketing materials. Had Apple launched the service like Google might, as an ad-supported product with a conspicuous beta tag reminding users that all bets were off, or as Microsoft might, as an unfinished Enterprise product that companies needed to roll out themselves with the help of an army of consultants, the launch problems Apple faced probably wouldn't have even been noticed.Â*

But they were, and in great detail. Some pundits demanded Apple shut down the new service, echoing their previous advice to shut down .Mac because they didn't see any purpose for it. By any account, the MobileMe launch was seriously botched. Earlier this week, Steve Jobs emailed Apple employees with a rundown on the launch problems, along with a hindsight plan for how MobileMe features could have been rolled out incrementally, and separately from the introduction of the iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0, and App Store. Jobs also noted that MobileMe should have been given "more time and testing" to meet Apple's standards.

While the launch of MobileMe certainly didn't go smoothly, the service itself is brilliantly well designed, both usable and attractive (despite some remaining flaws), and demonstrates the real potential of the future of web apps and web services. The next segment, which will kick off an entirely new series dedicated to MobileMe, will look closer at how Apple service works, and how it compares to competing services.

In the meantime, readers can find all six segments of AppleInsider's now completed "Inside iPhone 2.0" series on its own topics page.
post #2 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The .Mac iCards and .Mac Slides Publisher, which converted photos into email postcards and a screensaver, respectively, are also missing from MobileMe.

If anyone from Apple is following this, please bring back iCards. Pretty please.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #3 of 56
How on earth does this guy get away with a cursory look at the history of iTools, .Mac, and MobileMe... and calling that newsworthy?

This is just plain stupid...

Honestly...
post #4 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

While the launch of MobileMe certainly didn't go smoothly, the service itself is brilliantly well designed, both usable and attractive (despite some remaining flaws), and demonstrates the real potential of the future of web apps and web services.

Although I love this site and the analysis is often spot on, this article doesn't detail the real extent of MobileMe's continuing problems. Just go to the Apple MobileMe discussions forums and you'll see. I not only lost emails in the transition, but to this day my MobileMe email still does not push properly, the calendar syncing remains unreliable, and I have still not been able to sync all of my contacts. The support is a complete disaster, with users having to wait 1-1.5 hours sometimes just to chat with an Apple employee. Calling the service "brilliantly well designed", "usable" and "attractive" is ridiculous. Even Jobs himself has admitted that Apple has "a lot to learn" about these kinds of services. The criticism they have received is more than well deserved, as Apple has clearly bitten off more than it could chew.
post #5 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulmelqlo View Post

Although I love this site and the analysis is often spot on, this article doesn't detail the real extent of MobileMe's continuing problems. Just go to the Apple MobileMe discussions forums and you'll see. I not only lost emails in the transition, but to this day my MobileMe email still does not push properly, the calendar syncing remains unreliable, and I have still not been able to sync all of my contacts. The support is a complete disaster, with users having to wait 1-1.5 hours sometimes just to chat with an Apple employee. Calling the service "brilliantly well designed", "usable" and "attractive" is ridiculous. Even Jobs himself has admitted that Apple has "a lot to learn" about these kinds of services. The criticism they have received is more than well deserved, as Apple has clearly bitten off more than it could chew.

And I still say we the users still have to take some blame for this.

If we didn't want the lastest and greatest yesterday, then Apple would be free to create and come up with software / hardware for the masses at a pace they could handle.

I know, I for one, want the best, newest, coolest stuff - Now, and I like many others are paying the price for it now.

The likely downside to this, is that Apple will now take more time to come up with, announce and make available all of the new cool stuff, onlt after they feel it is ready and that Apple is ready for the high demands for it.

Skip
post #6 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

If anyone from Apple is following this, please bring back iCards. Pretty please.

I second that emotion.

I do feel (slightly) better now that I have fuller picture of the evolution of the iTools (had never even heard of it, joining the Mac ecosystem in mid 2003), .Mac & MobileMe. I guess things come and go based on functionality and useage.

But I still want my iCards back, Goddammit (Wow, thought the emotional impact of the loss was out of my system until that last word typed itself....)
post #7 of 56
Great job Kasper.

I am sure you took a great deal of time researching and editing to develop this article.

You must be quite a patient person. Sure wish a lot of your readers were as well.
post #8 of 56
I don't know how they are going to add Push to the Windows desktop apps, only Microsoft can do that. Unless they somehow make MobileMe mimic an Exchange server.
post #9 of 56
I agree, no amount of emails, Status Updates, or Steve Jobs oversight has improved this program. I continually have issues and no one I've contacted at Apple Support seems to have a clue on what to do.

As an Apple customer, and shareholder, I expect better.

As we speak, I've been waiting an hour for a Support Chat session that has said my wait time is approximately 1 minute. That's after waiting four hours yesterday.

Thank Jebus I only chose to use the trial. I'd be even more upset if I'd paid for this crap.
post #10 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulmelqlo View Post

Although I love this site and the analysis is often spot on, this article doesn't detail the real extent of MobileMe's continuing problems. Just go to the Apple MobileMe discussions forums and you'll see. I not only lost emails in the transition, but to this day my MobileMe email still does not push properly, the calendar syncing remains unreliable, and I have still not been able to sync all of my contacts. The support is a complete disaster, with users having to wait 1-1.5 hours sometimes just to chat with an Apple employee. Calling the service "brilliantly well designed", "usable" and "attractive" is ridiculous. Even Jobs himself has admitted that Apple has "a lot to learn" about these kinds of services. The criticism they have received is more than well deserved, as Apple has clearly bitten off more than it could chew.

So should Apple concede defeat and give up on the whole thing?? This was a disastrous launch, but the disaster was not complete. MobileMe is still far from perfect, but I'm quite impressed with it's operation (despite occasional aggravations from glitches and/or sync problems) thus far and expect it will only improve (as will the performance of the iPhone 3G, iPhone 2.0 software, App Store and Mac OS X as they all mature on their own and sync each other, and MobileMe).

I for one am growing tired of hearing how horribly Apple rolled its latest new product and services out. Yes, Apple tried to do too much in too short a time. Okay! We all know that. Apple knows that! Apple has let everybody know that they know, and that they know that we know. Fine. Not to be entirely dismissive of your frustrations (I've been a .Mac member since 2003 and I've had my own frustrations with this launch), but can we move on now? This debacle wasn't Apple's proudest moment. At all. But the company is handling the situation with remarkable poise and dedication to make this not only right, but great! Having survived early adopter struggles numerous times in the past, I'm fully confident Apple will turn this around and these nightmare weeks in the summer of '08 will eventually fade into distant memory.

Thanks for this series, AI! I particularly enjoyed the iPhone 3G comparison to other smartphones and will probably share this series with friends and colleagues who are possibly in the market for a new smartphone. I'm eager to read the next series that explores MobileMe more in-depthly. I hope the series features some type of roadmap (not merely idle speculation or unfounded predictions) of how Apple will be expanding upon and/or improving the service.

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #11 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

I for one am growing tired of hearing how horribly Apple rolled its latest new product and services out. Yes, Apple tried to do too much in too short a time. Okay! We all know that. Apple knows that! Apple has let everybody know that they know, and that they know that we know. Fine. Not to be entirely dismissive of your frustrations (I've been a .Mac member since 2003 and I've had my own frustrations with this launch), but can we move on now?

Ok then, how do you suggest we 'move on'? Say, "Thanks for taking a dump all over my Mac, PC and iPhone, Apple. But it's OK, we understand, everyone makes mistakes."?

Admitting fault is not the way resolve a mistake you made. Offering a solution, alternative, or compensation is. They haven't done that globally yet.

Your suggestion to just let it go is asinine and merely a reflection of what is wrong with our society as a whole at the moment.
post #12 of 56
this article is ridiculous.

first this paragraph is questionable:
Quote:
A big part of the launch problem was that Apple advertised the service too effectively, informing Joe Sixpack as to why he'd want push. That in turn created a mob that demanded the new service act as flawlessly as it appeared to in Apple's marketing materials. Had Apple launched the service like Google might, as an ad-supported product with a conspicuous beta tag reminding users that all bets were off, or as Microsoft might, as an unfinished Enterprise product that companies needed to roll out themselves with the help of an army of consultants, the launch problems Apple faced probably wouldn't have even been noticed.*

call people excited about the launch "Joe sixpack" for whatever reason, and then to assume that people are wrong for, you know, expecting the service to work as advertised.

then quick shots and microsoft and google. well, we know microsoft isn't good at rollouts, that's why we chose apple. and google has beta on top of all their stuff and it's free, so yeah, if things happen, we aren't paying for them, so we can't really complain about it. This is a product we are paying for, and have a right to be angry about.

Then one paragraph to sum up two pages saying, "well mobile me is good now! (kinda) so hooray". gives absolutely nothing to the reader who was wondering how well it works now as something to get for his/her iphone. No review, no screenshots, no first hand impressions.... nothing... and that's the only reason to read the article. The history of mobile me, is just that... history.. the article was called: "Inside iPhone 2.0: MobileMe Push Messaging" and totally missed the mark.
post #13 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

And I still say we the users still have to take some blame for this.

If we didn't want the lastest and greatest yesterday, then Apple would be free to create and come up with software / hardware for the masses at a pace they could handle.

I know, I for one, want the best, newest, coolest stuff - Now, and I like many others are paying the price for it now.

The likely downside to this, is that Apple will now take more time to come up with, announce and make available all of the new cool stuff, onlt after they feel it is ready and that Apple is ready for the high demands for it.

Skip

I'm going to disagree to a point. None of us users even knew what MobileMe was until WWDC (I think that's when it was announced). Sure we've wanted an upgrade to .Mac, but we also want upgrades to the Mac mini, and a minitower Mac, and lots of other stuff. Apple doesn't (normally) pre-announce and/or promise stuff. So while we have hopes and desires, expectations are kept in check.

But in the MobileMe case, Apple did pre-announce and make promises (ok, not really "promises", but you get the point). Apple is entirely responsible for setting those expectations and then failed miserably to deliver them. The points in the recent letter from Jobs about what they should have done could have been written by anybody experienced in big IT deployments the day after MobileMe was announced. Why did it take Apple until weeks after deployment to realized it? Every point in his letter was nothing more then the standard procedures any competent IT department would follow when deploying this type of system. It's as if Apple didn't have a single experienced manager leading the effort.

If Apple has 2 million MobileMe subscribers, that's $200 million in subscription fees. I think for that they could have afforded to hire a few people who have done this sort of thing before.
post #14 of 56
I guess I'm one of the "few" who hasn't experienced major trouble with MobileMe. I first opened my iTools account in January 2000 and have been a regular subscriber to the service ever since. While there have been a few little hiccups along the way, I've been very very pleased with the service over the years. There is one thing for sure: Apple WILL fix the issues (maybe not as fast as we'd sometimes like!). They always do. That's why I'm a loyal customer.

I have to say, tho, I do miss iCards as well. I found an app for my iPhone yesterday that works as a sort of substitute: SodaSnap. It's a little glitchy still, but it has great potential. The app is free, but I'd be willing to pay a nominal price for a few more features.
post #15 of 56
MobileMe is the bastard child of the iPhone- plain and simple.
Those of us who don't have the iPhone yet are Mac enthusiasts got screwed big time on this one. .Mac was fine as it was.
post #16 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetHammer View Post

Ok then, how do you suggest we 'move on'? Say, "Thanks for taking a dump all over my Mac, PC and iPhone, Apple. But it's OK, we understand, everyone makes mistakes."?

Admitting fault is not the way resolve a mistake you made. Offering a solution, alternative, or compensation is. They haven't done that globally yet.

Your suggestion to just let it go is asinine and merely a reflection of what is wrong with our society as a whole at the moment.

Do me a favor. Read this back to your mom. Or where you the only guy here that never had to be told to put the garbage out, make your bed or failed to call home and let your parents know where you were so they didn't have to worry all night.

What is wrong in this society is the constant, continuous, redundant merciless disparagements without offering suggestion, recommendations or assistants to making it better.

VelvetHammer, Your moniker suggests that you are only here to throw crap, and the attitude of your first time visits here, suggests that you have been banned in the past.
post #17 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by iChick View Post

I guess I'm one of the "few" who hasn't experienced major trouble with MobileMe. I first opened my iTools account in January 2000 and have been a regular subscriber to the service ever since. While there have been a few little hiccups along the way, I've been very very pleased with the service over the years. There is one thing for sure: Apple WILL fix the issues (maybe not as fast as we'd sometimes like!). They always do. That's why I'm a loyal customer.

I have to say, tho, I do miss iCards as well. I found an app for my iPhone yesterday that works as a sort of substitute: SodaSnap. It's a little glitchy still, but it has great potential. The app is free, but I'd be willing to pay a nominal price for a few more features.

January 6, 2000 for me. And very pleased as well.

However, my experience for iCards in the early days lead me away from using it in general. My corporate clients hated it because they found it slowed down their email services, and was particularly annoying for those who got a lot of emails. They didn't need or want the fluff. Keep in mind, the majority were using Windows 98.

But just the same, I do know from our electronic email service providers, that many companies/business individuals still hate getting particularly unsolicited emails or faxes with pics. Right now I have two major accounts that ban any emails that contain images. Links-to are fine, otherwise, forget it.
post #18 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

MobileMe is the bastard child of the iPhone- plain and simple.
Those of us who don't have the iPhone yet are Mac enthusiasts got screwed big time on this one. .Mac was fine as it was.

Teckstud: Most of your posts have criticised the iPhone, cell carriers and MobileMe, yet you don't and never had an iPhone. Why are you here?
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

MobileMe is the bastard child of the iPhone- plain and simple.
Those of us who don't have the iPhone yet are Mac enthusiasts got screwed big time on this one. .Mac was fine as it was.

you are crazy. .mac had terrible interfaces, slow as anything syncing with idisk, and it was well overpriced. mobileme has brought .mac to what it should be. and ADDED push capabilities if you have an iphone... if I didn't, I still would get mobile me, but because I do, it's even sweeter.

I wish it synched call logs and sms messages too...
post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Teckstud: Most of your posts have criticised the iPhone, cell carriers and MobileMe, yet you don't and never had an iPhone. Why are you here?

Because like maybe I had a .Mac account? Is that so hard to comprehend?
post #21 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by chadisawesome View Post

you are crazy. .mac had terrible interfaces, slow as anything syncing with idisk, and it was well overpriced. mobileme has brought .mac to what it should be. and ADDED push capabilities if you have an iphone... if I didn't, I still would get mobile me, but because I do, it's even sweeter.

I wish it synched call logs and sms messages too...

How did it bring it up to what it should be if it doesn't work properly?
post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Teckstud: Most of your posts have criticised the iPhone, cell carriers and MobileMe, yet you don't and never had an iPhone. Why are you here?

Abster2core: All you do is constantly demean those that disent from the Koolaid handed out or critize anything Apple. You never disagree with anything from Apple. Why? Is it because you are a "stockholder" and feel you must justify all decisions made as good and just?
Why can't you just accept that fact the MobileMe has flaws as even Steve Jobs has? No need to get so testy.
post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Do me a favor. Read this back to your mom. Or where you the only guy here that never had to be told to put the garbage out, make your bed or failed to call home and let your parents know where you were so they didn't have to worry all night.

What is wrong in this society is the constant, continuous, redundant merciless disparagements without offering suggestion, recommendations or assistants to making it better.

VelvetHammer, Your moniker suggests that you are only here to throw crap, and the attitude of your first time visits here, suggests that you have been banned in the past.

I'm not going to be enticed into a flame war with you. I'd suggest that unless you actually have something to contribute to the topic at hand, you keep your comments to yourself.
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Because like maybe I had a .Mac account? Is that so hard to comprehend?

So you had a .Mac account.

Am I gather then that all your complaints are now in reference to something that you never had?

It is a well known fact that one should never complain to one's waiter before their food has arrived. You seem to be complaining before you even enter the restaurant.
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

So you had a .Mac account.

Am I gather then that all you complaints are now in reference to something that you never had?

It is a well known fact that one should never complain to one's waiter before the food has arrived. You seem to be complaining before you even enter the restaurant.

You who know so much: My account expired June 25th and I've been waiting for MobileMe to work properly before I drop $99 and re-activate it.
You can take your crusty foot out of your mouth now.
post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetHammer View Post

Ok then, how do you suggest we 'move on'? Say, "Thanks for taking a dump all over my Mac, PC and iPhone, Apple. But it's OK, we understand, everyone makes mistakes."?

Admitting fault is not the way resolve a mistake you made. Offering a solution, alternative, or compensation is. They haven't done that globally yet.

Your suggestion to just let it go is asinine and merely a reflection of what is wrong with our society as a whole at the moment.

The personal attack is uncalled for; I won't justify it by responding in kind. I will say that I don't believe my suggestion is asinine. Apple has worked tirelessly to correct the mistakes they've made recently and HAS, as I understand, responded with compensation in the form of a one-month extension of MobileMe service for ALL MobileMe subscribers. If that isn't satisfactory to you, or others, take it up with Apple. But I'm not going to cry over spilled milk anymore.

As for problems in our society (and I offer my apologies to other readers/posters staying on topic), I think before others can be held accountable, one must hold oneself accountable. As this relates to Apple's latest rollout specifically, anyone, and everyone, reading this forum should know by now that being an early adopter of new technology carries with it certain risks. Either be prepared to accept those risks, or wait until the technology has proven itself.

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

You who know so much: My account expired June 25th and I've been waiting for MobileMe to work properly before I drop $99 and re-activate it.
You can take your crusty foot out of your mouth now.

Hmm. Apple didn't officially launch MobileMe until July 11, you never having had an iPhone to try it with, and you wonder why I challenge your disparaging comments about products you never had.
post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by abster2core View Post

hmm. Apple didn't officially launch mobileme until july 11, you never having had an iphone to try it with, and you wonder why i challenge your disparaging comments about products you never had.

No -I wonder why you can't cannot comprehend that I had a .Mac account that worked and still wish I had it!
Now do you understand????
post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

The personal attack is uncalled for; I won't justify it by responding in kind. I will say that I don't believe my suggestion is asinine. Apple has worked tirelessly to correct the mistakes they've made recently and HAS, as I understand, responded with compensation in the form of a one-month extension of MobileMe service for ALL MobileMe subscribers. If that isn't satisfactory to you, or others, take it up with Apple. But I'm not going to cry over spilled milk anymore.

So, if you lost your e-mail, etc. (basically part of the so-called 1%), what would you do then? Say nothing?

How about I put it this way? Lets say power was lost for 1% of the city and you were part of this 1%, you wouldn't complain?


Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

As for problems in our society (and I offer my apologies to other readers/posters staying on topic), I think before others can be held accountable, one must hold oneself accountable. As this relates to Apple's latest rollout specifically, anyone, and everyone, reading this forum should know by now that being an early adopter of new technology carries with it certain risks. Either be prepared to accept those risks, or wait until the technology has proven itself.

So what about those who've been a .Mac member prior to MobileMe who had no option but to switch, they shouldn't complain either?


Sorry, you may be tired of the "whiners," but I'm tired of the apologists.
post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Hmm. Apple didn't officially launch MobileMe until July 11, you never having had an iPhone to try it with, and you wonder why I challenge your disparaging comments about products you never had.

Why do you assume that everybody who had a .Mac membership has an iPhone?
post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Do me a favor. Read this back to your mom. Or where you the only guy here that never had to be told to put the garbage out, make your bed or failed to call home and let your parents know where you were so they didn't have to worry all night.

What is wrong in this society is the constant, continuous, redundant merciless disparagements without offering suggestion, recommendations or assistants to making it better.

VelvetHammer, Your moniker suggests that you are only here to throw crap, and the attitude of your first time visits here, suggests that you have been banned in the past.

Again (just like my previous post), I pose this to back at you:

You were obviously not a part of the "so-called 1%," but if you were: i.e. lost e-mail, no e-mail service for weeks, etc, how would you react? Are you saying that nothing should be said?

Lets flip it again: Let say your city lost power, but got it restored and only 1% of the city still had no power. Lets say you were part of this 1% are you saying that no one should complain?

Finally, on the topic of this being a "new product." Sorry, this is hogwash. The .Mac folks had no choice but to "upgrade" to MobileMe. What should they do then? Not complain?


Sorry (just like I said to Dana), you may be tired of the "whiners," but I'm tired of the apologists.
post #32 of 56
An insider who feels that Apple has now put the right man on the job of insuring MobileMe runs as solid as the iTunes store:
http://chuqui.typepad.com/chuqui_30/...me-proble.html
post #33 of 56
As a professional, mobileme/.mac or whatever has never been very interesting to me. It's sort of acted as a half-ass, stop-gap solution for my small office to share calendars and contacts...but the push email, etc. is useless unless you want to do business communication with a joeblow@mac.com email address...which I don't know anyone who would. I guess it's an almost interesting option for personal users, though I don't really see why with all of the free, online solutions like gmail, flickr, etc. which seem much more reliable and easy to use. I think mobileme would be much more compelling if it were more robust and offered something that was a little more like a remote apple server, with more customizable options...or something.

Sorry, just rambling a bit.
post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by w00master View Post

So, if you lost your e-mail, etc. (basically part of the so-called 1%), what would you do then? Say nothing?

The complaints are well known. Is there anything more to add about the ,Mac upgrade?

Quote:
How about I put it this way? Lets say power was lost for 1% of the city and you were part of this 1%, you wouldn't complain?

I would inform my power company of the outage, but if I had already done so, if I was privy to other people doing so and have heard them admit fault for the issue and state they are working on fixing it I wouldn't keep calling them about it. And I certainly wouldn't be expecting free month of power for my inconvenience.

Quote:
So what about those who've been a .Mac member prior to MobileMe who had no option but to switch, they shouldn't complain either?

Your email address is the same, you can still use mac.com to access your account and you now get double the storage capacity. It does seem asinine to complain about a product name change and, for most people, to complain about Apple using modern web code. Facebook recently changed their webpage setup and they didn't ask me and I hear no one complaining about them not being given an option. The only valid "switch" complaints are for the well beaten lack of iCards, the lesser beaten web bookmarks, and the hardly discussed lack of older browser support with a simpler interface and the lack of direct web access from Mobile Safari.

Quote:
Sorry, you may be tired of the "whiners," but I'm tired of the apologists.

Either end of the spectrum is bad. My problem with whiners is that many tend to rehash the same things and they usually don't propose any solution to resolve the issue.

Apple has admitted fault to both the consumer, has compensated them (even though it's mostly a frivolous act that benefits the consumer little), and has released an internal email as to how they should have done things differently. Only fixing MM's problems will make things right but at least we know Apple is taking some steps to ensure this doesn't occur again. If you are really unhappy with MM I'm pretty sure you can call Apple support and get them to refund you for the remainder of your contract.
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post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Hmm. Apple didn't officially launch MobileMe until July 11, you never having had an iPhone to try it with, and you wonder why I challenge your disparaging comments about products you never had.

Push, push- in the bush.
Those of us who had .Mac accounts and no iPhones were forced to upgrade and could care less for push.
Curious but I wonder what the percent of those with and without iPhones were prior with .Mac?
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I would inform my power company of the outage, but if I had already done so, if I was privy to other people doing so and have heard them admit fault for the issue and state they are working on fixing it I wouldn't keep calling them about it. And I certainly wouldn't be expecting free month of power for my inconvenience.

So, lets say (like Apple), you continue to not get service. Again, you're saying that you should keep your mouth shut? I highly doubt that anyone would do this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Your email address is the same, you can still use mac.com to access your account and you now get double the storage capacity. It does seem asinine to complain about a product name change and, for most people, to complain about Apple using modern web code. Facebook recently changed their webpage setup and they didn't ask me and I hear no one complaining about them not being given an option. The only valid "switch" complaints are for the well beaten lack of iCards, the lesser beaten web bookmarks, and the hardly discussed lack of older browser support with a simpler interface and the lack of direct web access from Mobile Safari.

I think you misinterpreted what I was talking about. I'm relating to people saying that "MobileMe is all new, and you shouldn't expect much from new tech!" Well sorry, but if you're e-mail was "relatively" consistent on .Mac, something you depended on, but suddenly it went to "MobileMe" and you *lost* said e-mail, *this* is where the complaints come from. The "complaints" over the name/etc. on MobileMe are trite, but that's not what we're talking about here.

.Mac users had no choice to switch to MobileMe, so this argument about "new tech" simply has holds no validity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Either end of the spectrum is bad. My problem with whiners is that many tend to rehash the same things and they usually don't propose any solution to resolve the issue.

I agree with you on this. However, I want to clarify my position. I think "whining" about missing hardware features, like for example on the iPhone: no Video, no upgrade to camera, are trite when they continue. However, when something is *broken* I think people have the right to complain until the issue is resolved. I know I would.

However, on the "proposed solution," explain to me how this can be done when you can't even get a hold of a Apple customer service rep? Hmmm? Also, what sort of solutions can a consumer *really* have? This is Apple's fault and problem and it should be fixed by them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Apple has admitted fault to both the consumer, has compensated them (even though it's mostly a frivolous act that benefits the consumer little), and has released an internal email as to how they should have done things differently. Only fixing MM's problems will make things right but at least we know Apple is taking some steps to ensure this doesn't occur again. If you are really unhappy with MM I'm pretty sure you can call Apple support and get them to refund you for the remainder of your contract.

It is *very* difficult to end this service, primarily b/c my primary e-mail is with .Mac. However, it's beginning to turn out that I have little to no option then to end my subscription.
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelnyc View Post

As a professional, mobileme/.mac or whatever has never been very interesting to me. It's sort of acted as a half-ass, stop-gap solution for my small office to share calendars and contacts...but the push email, etc. is useless unless you want to do business communication with a joeblow@mac.com email address...which I don't know anyone who would. I guess it's an almost interesting option for personal users, though I don't really see why with all of the free, online solutions like gmail, flickr, etc. which seem much more reliable and easy to use. I think mobileme would be much more compelling if it were more robust and offered something that was a little more like a remote apple server, with more customizable options...or something.

Sorry, just rambling a bit.

I've had .mac since 2004 and have never used the email until now. I use the new Push service by having all my Gmail forwarded to my .Mac address so I can get them on my iPhone immediately.

The reason I have been using .Mac and have been paying for it despite having a Gmail and Flickr account (which I use) is that .Mac/MM offer so much more than either of those two combined.

For one, there is 20GB of cloud storage and 200GB of transfer month. This on is usually more expensive than the $6.67/month I pay for MM service. Secondly, it will automatically sync my contacts bookmarks and calendars across all my Macs, and now iPhone and Windows PCs. Third, it stores all this data for me, as well as my Dashboard Widgets, Dock Items, Keychains, Mail Accounts, Mail Settings (rules, signatures, smart mailboxes), Notes and System Preferences. Fouth, it offers me a domain for hosting a website, data files or images quickly right through iWeb, Finder, or iPhoto. Fifth, it allows me to connect with ease Back To My Mac when traveling.

Those are things the free services can offer and the ease of use that no other cloud service can match at any price. It's certainly not perfectIMO it's been Apple's worst product since it was iToolsbut it's a good product for all that it does for a Mac user.
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post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


Those are things the free services can offer and the ease of use that no other cloud service can match at any price. It's certainly not perfect—IMO it's been Apple's worst product since it was iTools—but it's a good product for all that it does for a Mac user.

And you've indirectly hit the problem on the head because it had changed and is no longer meant for a Mac user but for an iPhone user- big difference.
post #39 of 56
The service is still pretty spotty, and the promised "almost daily updates" from the guy at Apple dried up. Meanwhile, I have this odd situation where calendar changes seem to get pushed to all my Macs, but not to my iPhone or to the calendar on the me.com website. Hmm...
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by w00master View Post

So, lets say (like Apple), you continue to not get service. Again, you're saying that you should keep your mouth shut? I highly doubt that anyone would do this.

I'm saying don't waste your energy voicing to those that can't help and voice them in a way to maximize your results.

Quote:
I think you misinterpreted what I was talking about. I'm relating to people saying that "MobileMe is all new, and you shouldn't expect much from new tech!" Well sorry, but if you're e-mail was "relatively" consistent on .Mac, something you depended on, but suddenly it went to "MobileMe" and you *lost* said e-mail, *this* is where the complaints come from. The "complaints" over the name/etc. on MobileMe are trite, but that's not what we're talking about here.

The loss of even 1 email, much less one account holders email or even 1% is unbelievable in this day and age. They'e stated that it's all been restored but I've heard some say that isn't true. If you have lost email then I suggest calling 1-800-MY-APPLE. If you've done it then I'd call again and have it escalated.

Quote:
.Mac users had no choice to switch to MobileMe, so this argument about "new tech" simply has holds no validity.

I hope you aren't suggesting that Apple not ever update the .Mac code unless all .Mac members agree to it? I don't recall anyone complaining last year when mail was updated. Unlike native apps where you have a choice to upgrade, companies with web-based apps have to take that risk. We've had issues on AI forums when they've updated vBulletin. Paid or free these issues do happen. Apple has admitted that they shouldn't have tried to do it all at once and apologized for it so our choices are we can stop using MM or hope for now is that they have learned from this mistake.

Quote:
However, on the "proposed solution," explain to me how this can be done when you can't even get a hold of a Apple customer service rep? Hmmm?

1-800-MY-APPLE will get you a CSR.

Quote:
Also, what sort of solutions can a consumer *really* have? This is Apple's fault and problem and it should be fixed by them.

I am sure you can get your money back if you tried. They are fixing it and we have admittance of fault, progress with MM working better and an apology. I'm not sure what more you want except getting your money back.

Quote:
It is *very* difficult to end this service, primarily b/c my primary e-mail is with .Mac. However, it's beginning to turn out that I have little to no option then to end my subscription.

I'd get Gmail and start to get your contacts to change this address by having your outgoing mail all come from the Gmail account. But you don't want to have to view two accounts so can just have your mac.com address auto-forward the mail to Gmail. And once you finally get the majority of your contacts using Gmail you can have an auto reply for your mac.com address that informs people to update their address books to your new email address.
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