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Review: Apple's second-generation iPod touch

post #1 of 94
Thread Starter 
The 2008 iPod touch inches closer to the iPhone line while retaining its iPod branding. It gets new audio input and recording features, volume controls, a speaker, and a full assortment of bundled apps, including Nike+ support.

Missing features on the first generation touch

When the iPod touch debuted last year, we warned that it wasn't really the "iPhone without the phone" that many assumed it would be. Apple seemed to be too wary of creating any product confusion between its new iPhone and the existing iPod line, and made a series of compromises on the touch intended to create artificial differentiation.

The original iPod touch, like all previous iPods but unlike the iPhone, lacked an audio output speaker and subsequently also had no volume rocker buttons or a silent switch. Instead, it just provided a simple piezo speaker capable of only making simple beeps. It also lacked the iPhone's fourth conductor on its headphone jack, making it unable to work with the iPhone's mic-integrated headphones for both audio recording and the play, pause, and 'click to skip' remote control features.


The first generation iPod touch also lacked the iPhone's Mail app, and provided a read-only Calendar. It also lacked Google Maps, Stocks and Weather, and Notes. Apple addressed these missing software features in a $20 package of apps that it offered months afterward, and later bundled the apps on all new iPod touch units.

Apple also differentiated the iPod touch from the iPhone by changing the home screen dock to appear more like the Mac OS X Leopard dock, complete with reflections (below: first generation iPhone and iPod touch). Those differentiations were later removed and the touch is now identical to the iPhone.



The second generation touch feature rundown

The new second generation 2008 version of the touch not only leaves the software gaps filled, but also rounds out the missing hardware features. There's still a few differences; the new touch lacks a camera, GPS, and of course has no mobile data network features. In other areas however, the touch catches up to the iPhone and even ups the ante with a few new tricks up its sleeve.

From the front, the iPhone 3G and new iPod touch appear virtually identical, as this comparison between the touch and the thicker and slightly longer white iPhone 3G indicates (below).



Audio output

The loudest change on the touch is its new integrated speaker. While it doesn't deliver great sound, the new speaker is serviceable for listening to music and decent for listening to podcasts in a reasonably quiet environment. It also enables the touch to play the same alarm and alert sounds as the iPhone, rather than just the simple beeps of the original touch.

Unlike the iPhone's speakerphone, the new touch lack any obvious hole for the external speaker (below), so sound appears to be coming out through its metal back. While the iPhone 3G can be nearly silenced by placing a finger over its speakerphone hole, the volume on the new iPod touch barely even gets any softer if you cover the dock connector and headphone jacks with your hand.



The sound output appears to be a bit of a mystery: it seems to radiate out the metal back, and certainly can't come through the solid glass front. Its speaker sounds tinnier and less pleasant than the one in the iPhone 3G, although it is about as loud. This may be because audio has to rattle past the metal back and (apparently) through the dock connector rather than being directed through a ported speaker opening as on the iPhone.

The new touch also lacks the iPhone's earpiece speaker and integrated mic, as it isn't intended to be used next your your face. For the same reason, it also lacks a proximity detector, so the screen won't turn off if you slap it upside your head. The touch also lacks the iPhone's silent switch, but does include a volume rocker switch (below).



Audio input

While it lacks the iPhone's integrated mic next to the dock connector, the new touch now supports audio input via the headphone jack using the same four conductor headphone port as the iPhone. However, the software for audio recording apparently isn't finished yet.

Apple lists the second generation touch as being compatible with the two new sets of mic-enabled headphones due next month, but unlike the 4G nano or 120GB classic, the touch lacks the ability to record audio presently, even with the iPhone's mic/headphones, because there is no software support for it on the touch yet.

Once Apple ships the headphones, the new touch will require a software update. Most likely, the headphones aren't ready because of the software still being unfinished rather than the other way around. Note that earlier iPods, including the first iPod touch and the 2007 3G nano and classic, will never work with mic-enabled headphones because they lack the fourth conductor mic support on their headphone jacks.

Apple hasn't said anything about not releasing audio recording software for the iPhone at the same time, and it would be monstrously stupid if if Apple arbitrarily chose not to offer that.

On page 2 of 3: Battery Life; Bluetooth; Display; iPhone Design; Physical features; and Nike+

Battery Life

The previous touch claimed 22 hours of audio and 5 hours of video, but could easily last for nearly 30 hours of audio playback, although reaching a full 5 hours of video was hard to accomplish. The new model now claims 36 hours of audio and 6 hours of video. We found it actually lasts for nearly 40 hours of music, but delivers roughly 5:45 of video with the screen a half brightness. The iPod touch ships with the screen set to about a third brightness, so Apple's video settings are probably accurate when used at its out of the box setting.

Battery life will drop if you have WiFi on, or use the Nike+ transmitter, or particularly if you're playing games, which tax both the backlight and the processor. That being said, the ultra thin touch begin able to last for that much audio playback is pretty remarkable. If you want even longer playback, you can choose from a variety of standard external battery packs that use the dock connector.

Bluetooth

The new iPod touch also doesn't officially support Bluetooth, but that may be because Apple hasn't finished its Bluetooth software support, even on the iPhone. Currently, the iPhone's Bluetooth support is only limited to mono headsets and car integration kits. Many users would like to see support for data sync and stereo headsets. It appears the touch has Bluetooth hardware, so this limitation may be addressed in a software update.

Display

While many complained about the screen on the original iPod touch, we could see no differences between the 2G touch and an iPhone 3G with both set to the same brightness and viewed next to each other, let alone in casual independent comparisons. The display is clear, bright, and sharp. We experience no problems related to touch sensitivity either.

iPhone Design

When the first iPod touch appeared, it sported a distinctive industrial design that made it look significantly different from the iPhone; it had a polished metal back but an anodized black bezel around the face, and unlike the original iPhone, it had a wider black matte margin around the screen.

The iPhone 3G swapped its flat aluminum back for a shiny black or white plastic shell, gained a curvier body, and copied the same black margin of the iPod touch while keeping its chrome bezel.

The second touch model takes cues from the new iPhone, with the same smoothly rounded back (albeit in polished aluminum characteristic of the iPod line), and now has the same distinctive chrome frame around the screen as the iPhone, although it is slightly more subdued than on its iPhone brother.







Physical features

The new touch, like the previous model and recent nanos, continues to put the headphone jack on the bottom of the unit next to the dock connector. On the iPhone, this is on the top. Both models have a wake button on the top edge, although the touch places it on the top left rather than the top right (above).

The body itself is remarkably thin, thinner that even last year's wafer thin touch that seemed impossibly thin already. While thinner, the new touch feels more substantial and less fragile. The device feels remarkably comfortable in the hand, and it is so slim that it will make iPhone 3G users feel like their new phone is thick, just like the original touch made the first iPhone suddenly feel bulky.

One last difference in the touch and the iPhone 3G is that the metal back (now with a streamlined oval WiFi window) of the touch always feels cool as it wicks heat away from your hand. The plastic back of the new iPhones feels warmer because the plastic acts as an insulator (and when you're using 3G, it feels particularly warm of course.)



Nike+

The new touch includes built in support for Nike+, so users can put it to work with their existing sensor device. Apart from the entire iPod nano line, the second generation touch is the only other iPod model that currently works with Nike+. The original touch, iPhone, and iPhone 3G are not supported, nor are any hard drive based iPods.

The new touch ships with Nike+ software that currently does not work with the iPhone. This not only supports the Nike+ shoe sensor, but also plugs into compatible treadmills, ellipticals, stair steppers, and stationary bikes via the dock connector. Setup is performed by going to Settings/Nike+iPod and turning the setting on. Once enabled, you can select Sensor, and a voice will instruct you to "walk around to activate your sensor" (below).

Neither iPhone model includes built in support for Nike+, nor do they work with the dock connector wireless receiver designed for the Nanos. The iPhone also lacks the software for working with either the shoe sensor or exercise equipment. Whether the iPhone will ever be supported by Nike+ is yet unknown, but there is greater potential for the iPhone to not be supported for Nike+ than for audio recording, as it would apparently require the development of a new Nike+ dock connector adapter.

We'll take a closer look at the Nike+ features of the new touch in a followup segment.


On page 3 of 3: Podcasts; Other new software and features; Package details; Product Review Rundown; and Rating.

Podcasts

With the new iPhone 2.1 software, podcast art is drawn larger, making programs easier to identify at the expense of limiting the text length of the podcast name. It also now begins playing the next episode after completing the first, so you can listen to a series of episodes uninterrupted rather than having to start playback over and over as each ends.

Other new software and features

The original touch debuted some new software ahead of the iPhone: it came with the new WiFi Store with Starbucks integration, supported video output via the dock connector, closed captioning in iTunes content that provided it, and included some new international and input features related to the its revised 1.1 firmware, including the home button double click feature. Those features later made it to the iPhone in a subsequent software update.

The new touch 2.1.1. software also introduces some new features that were mostly shipped with iPhone 2.1 (Apple hasn't shipped a 2.1.1. update for the iPhone, so they aren't running identical OS versions), including the Genius Playlist feature. Once activated in iTunes, Genius allows you to automatically create a playlist of similar tracks based on a song you select by hitting the Genius atom icon (below left), which produces a Genius playlist based on the music in your library.



Apple is also heavily promoting iPhone apps and particularly games on the iPod touch. It includes WiFi and accelerometer support, so the only iPhone software that would not be compatible with it are those that require a mobile data network, GPS, or camera. Most titles make efforts to ensure they are compatible with both, even if they can make use of features that are only on the iPhone.

Because the iPod touch runs the same software as the iPhone 3G, you can consult our previous review series on the software features of its bundles apps, the Apps Store, and its push messaging features. The previous iPod touch review also profiled its WiFi iTunes Store and other features that haven't changed, such as video output:

An in-depth iPod Touch review

Inside iPhone 2.0: the new iPhone 3G Software
Inside iPhone 2.0: iPhone OS vs. other mobile platforms
Inside iPhone 2.0: the new iPhone App Store
Inside iPhone 2.0: MobileMe Push Messaging

Package details





The second generation iPod touch now ships in a simple plastic coffin box just like the nanos (above), with standard earbud headphones (no mic), a dock connector insert for a Universal iPod Dock, a USB cable, a screen wipe, and a small quick start guide (below). There's no little plastic clip to hold the unit upright on a desk like the one that shipped with the original model.



The clear box is actually strong enough and small enough to serve as a travel shipping box if you cared to use it for some extra armor when throwing the touch into a suitcase or backpack.

If you want a dock, USB power adapter, or video output cables you'll have to buy those separately. Apple will also be offering a pair of standard mic-integrated headphones and a premium dual driver in ear pair that both will allow audio recording, planned for next month.

The iPod touch does not work with the iPod Radio Remote accessory, so if you want to listen to the radio and won't settle for Internet streaming feeds via AOL Radio, you'll need to buy a radio. Like all other iPods since the iPhone 3G, the new touch also does not charge over Firewire.

Product Review Rundown

The new iPod touch delivers nearly all of the non-phone features of the iPhone (apart from a camera, Bluetooth, and GPS), along with a few that might remain unique to the touch, including Nike+ and audio recording.

It feels and looks great, fitting the ideal of a perfectly ultramodern iPod, with the same bright and responsive screen (although it ships with the full brightness turned down) and the same highly polished iPod back that is sure to get scratched up quickly if you don't keep it in a protective case. The front appears identical to the iPhone, with an easy to wipe clean glass front that is very resilient to scratches.

The new touch inherits the iPhone's App Store ability to install new software features and play games, which has greatly improved overall with the latest iPhone 2.1 update, although there's still a few remaining bugs to hammer out. This device is really remarkable as a product overall, and it's great to see Apple didn't take the same conservative path of artificially reserving a lot of software features to create some differentiation between it and the iPhone. It appears that the company is now comfortable selling the touch and iPhone together without worrying about their sales damaging each other.

What's missing? There's no radio features at all, so if you bought the future and need to live in the past you'll have to carry a $15 radio around with you as well. Its slim profile means that the battery will eventually run out, although with the iPhone 2.1 update battery life seems to only get better.

It's hard to find much to complain about, and given that the touch has shared so much technology back and forth with the iPhone, it's not hard to understand why. What will be interesting is how Apple might manage to top itself, as the iPhone touch doens't seem to have much potential for getting smaller. More capacity would be nice as Flash memory becomes cheaper, but the 32GB option, combined with the capability to buy new music on the fly, should satisfy most users. Add in a $100 price cut, and the new iPod touch line ($229 for the 8GB, $299 for the 16GB, $399 for the 32GB version) looks like a great product.

Rating 4 out of 5


Pros

Super thin and comfortable to hold, with a substantial, sturdy construction.

High quality, bright, scratch resistant screen.

Full software features, with Nike+ and audio recording (still to be delivered).

TV output for movie rentals and downloads.

App Store, WiFi Store, accelerometer support.

Audio recording features using an iPhone-style integrated mic.

Cons

Polished back will scratch if not protected.

New speaker isn't very high quality.

No GPS or Bluetooth.

More photos

High-quality unboxing photos of Apple's second-gen iPod touch
post #2 of 94
Can it do disk mode so you can use it as a portable hard drive like "real" iPods?
post #3 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Can it do disk mode so you can use it as a portable hard drive like "real" iPods?

You can, but not out of the box or via an iTunes setting. Air Shaing will allow you mount it as a wireless drive on a LAN. It's still free, I'd get it before it jumps to $7.
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post #4 of 94
The GF is balking at the yearly cost of an AT&T contract for the iPhones. We don't really want a data plan and AT&T forces you to buy one. I'm sure I'd like it if I had it, but I'd be content with phone and Wi-Fi.

Anyway, it would be nice if Nike released a kit that would enable the touch to used as a bike computer, ideally with several bikes (I have 3). If I could keep the thing in my pack, but it could report average speed and mileage. Yes, I could get a standard bike computer, but riding is my time AWAY from computers and monitors. Is there any chance of this happening?

I'm curious about using it in disk mode. Ideally, I'd use the touch to replace my Palm TX and use it for flash storage of files. I prefer to keep music in my 80GB iPod 5G.
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post #5 of 94
I wish it had either GPS or a Camera. And of course more space (64gb)

I'd pay more for these features.
post #6 of 94
Thanks for this great review.

Also missing on this new iPod touch, the ability to sync the notes with Mail and the to-do app ! \

Apple may still consider the iPod touch not to be a PDA, but most of the standard PDA features are there, except the two listed before.

Is there a serious reason, technical or marketing, not to include them
post #7 of 94
Did I miss somewhere where the sound quality of the iPod Touch was reviewed?
post #8 of 94
Forgiving the apparent lack of grammar check , please please help the readership understand why you still insist on claiming the 2G Touch is thinner than it's predecessor? While it's now tapered in at the edges, it is actually thicker by all of half a millimeter- basically the same thickness in my book but certainly not thinner???

post #9 of 94
This was a nice review but by my estimation you where way to soft on Apple on two really important items.

First we have the issue of Blutooth which you rightly pointed out really isn't even implemented on iPhone. The problem as I see it, is that this is a much larger problem than indicated and as such should be stressed as a negative more. Apples wishy washy approach to Blutooth has many wondering just how far they will go in support of the tech. From the standpoint of a developer the lack of Bluetooth severly limits what can be done as far as innovative apps go.

The next issue is the max flash size. Frankly I find it disgusting that Apple Produced a new rev to Touch and thumbed their nose at people wanting higher capacity versions. This is especially the case when it is now obvious that Apple has a source for high capacity flash devices at reasonable price. This reminds me of the AIR boondoggle in that they have focused on form over function. It is almost like they don't know what they are selling here, Touch is much more than an MP3 player thus space is real important. You can chew through a lot of space just with a few games and apps. It is almost like Apple hasn't grasped the fact that they are in the game machine business and don't have the cartridge model to support multiple games on the platform. That is the only practical place to store your games on a flash based device like Touch is on the device. After all of this one has to consider a movie or two on the device. It all adds up to way to little flash.

Those are the two biggies. I'm not to happy about the waste of I/O that is Nike+. There is no reason why something like Nike+ couldn't have been handled on standard I/O ports. Frankly doing so would benefit both the user and Apple.

Now don't get me wrong some nice stuff was added to Touch. In fact many of the things I was looking for. But not a reasonable amount of flash and this blows big time. Based on this I likely won't buy, more so I'd have to reccomend that people think long and hard about Touch gen2.

Like AIR I think it will get a lot of initial sales but I don't see a big pull for upgraders and users of other IPods. Now the comparison to AIR might be over blown as Touch 2 is a much better device for it's market than AIR is. It is just that the users of Touch devices are getting smarter and more demanding thus will see the capacity constraints as unacceptable limitations.

So in a nut shell I'd be more mixed in my evaluation of Touch. For many it will be an excellent platform but I don't see massive increases in sales. Why might even see a contraction.

Dave
post #10 of 94
apple should really start advertising the ipod touch as a gaming device. in the future at least, once more recognizable games are available and improved graphics are in place. imagine an ipod touch tv ad mainly displaying games on the touch, it would sell.

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post #11 of 94
Why just one photo comparing it with the previous generation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by macapptraining View Post

apple should really start advertising the ipod touch as a gaming device. in the future at least, once more recognizable games are available and improved graphics are in place. imagine an ipod touch tv ad mainly displaying games on the touch, it would sell.

I thought the graphics were more than competitive for the size, about as good as the PSP or so.
post #12 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by macapptraining View Post

apple should really start advertising the ipod touch as a gaming device. in the future at least, once more recognizable games are available and improved graphics are in place. imagine an ipod touch tv ad mainly displaying games on the touch, it would sell.

Uhhh... what would you consider this????

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXfjcM_q6MM
post #13 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Did I miss somewhere where the sound quality of the iPod Touch was reviewed?

Not to be smart but I think the time is long past where most people think about Touch as a simple MP3 player. It has quickly distanced itself from that single focus.

Now that does mean sound quality should be ignored. The problem is how do you quantify that quality. Especially when MP3 players in general have a bad reputation. The other problem is that if you want technical answers most Internet sites are not set up to do a proper job of it.

Dave
post #14 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by macapptraining View Post

imagine an ipod touch tv ad mainly displaying games on the touch, it would sell.


Yes, just imagine........

http://www.apple.com/ipodtouch/gallery/ads/
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post #15 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by macapptraining View Post

apple should really start advertising the ipod touch as a gaming device. in the future at least, once more recognizable games are available and improved graphics are in place. imagine an ipod touch tv ad mainly displaying games on the touch, it would sell.

The recent iPod/iTunes presentation was all about music, except when it came to the Touch, then it was all about gaming.

Even the first 2nd gen. iPod Touch commercial focused entirely on games.
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post #16 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Not to be smart but I think the time is long past where most people think about Touch as a simple MP3 player. It has quickly distanced itself from that single focus.

Now that does mean sound quality should be ignored. The problem is how do you quantify that quality. Especially when MP3 players in general have a bad reputation. The other problem is that if you want technical answers most Internet sites are not set up to do a proper job of it.

Dave

Regardless how you classify it- it's a listening device and the sound quality should be reviewed- period. You don't need to quantify it- you simply state objectively how it sounds. It's not technical. The video image was reviewed and so should the sound.
If it sounds like crap- would you buy it?
post #17 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Regardless how you classify it- it's a listening device and the sound quality should be reviewed- period. You don't need to quantify it- you simply state objectively how it sounds. It's not technical. The video image was reviewed and so should the sound.
If it sounds like crap- would you buy it?

It doesn't sound like crap. Beyond that, though, you DO need to quantify it to make it useful and that would be another article. Anyway, I'd recommend listening to one in the store if you're really that concerned.
post #18 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

It doesn't sound like crap. Beyond that, though, you DO need to quantify it to make it useful and that would be another article. Anyway, I'd recommend listening to one in the store if you're really that concerned.

NO you don't need to technically quantify it. Simply state- It is tinny? Is it crisp/ clear? Is it bright? How does it compare to the last Ipod touch - which I understand did not sound particularly great, etc, etc. Does it sound as good as the Classic.
I't's an iPod first- it's all about the music.
The chips keep changing on these and there are noticeable changes sometimes. I and others would like to know the AI's opinion. To omit the sound of it is really not giving it a full review.
post #19 of 94
The back of the iPod Touch 2G is Polished Steel NOT Aluminium as stated in the review.
post #20 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

It doesn't sound like crap. Beyond that, though, you DO need to quantify it to make it useful and that would be another article. Anyway, I'd recommend listening to one in the store if you're really that concerned.

By that measure, then display quality would need to be a separate review yet again. While I don't think a whole lot of people here are that particular about either feature, a quick mention would be good, they gave a couple sentences to the video, why not the same for audio?
post #21 of 94
A much better, in depth review is at iLounge.com.
The sound and video are discussed and both get a favorable rating over the last iPod Touch.
post #22 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Did I miss somewhere where the sound quality of the iPod Touch was reviewed?

Read the article again. The sound quality was reviewed. The speaker on the Touch does not compare to the quality of the iPhone, mainly because it is missing a specific speaker output vent. It is better than the piezo speaker on the original, but sounds more tinny than the speaker in the iPhone. It is an improvement, but not quite matching the iPhone speaker.
post #23 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Read the article again. The sound quality was reviewed. The speaker on the Touch does not compare to the quality of the iPhone, mainly because it is missing a specific speaker output vent. It is better than the piezo speaker on the original, but sounds more tinny than the speaker in the iPhone. It is an improvement, but not quite matching the iPhone speaker.

Not the speaker - the sound through the headphones!
post #24 of 94
FYI: the photos in page one of the article are distorted (wrong HTML size). Right-click and open in new window to see them accurately, and check page two also. For example, this photo above makes them look thinner than they are, but page two shows the true image:
http://images.appleinsider.com/ipodtouch2-review-4.jpg
post #25 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

This was a nice review but by my estimation you where way to soft on Apple on two really important items.

First we have the issue of Blutooth which you rightly pointed out really isn't even implemented on iPhone. The problem as I see it, is that this is a much larger problem than indicated and as such should be stressed as a negative more. Apples wishy washy approach to Blutooth has many wondering just how far they will go in support of the tech. From the standpoint of a developer the lack of Bluetooth severly limits what can be done as far as innovative apps go.

The next issue is the max flash size. Frankly I find it disgusting that Apple Produced a new rev to Touch and thumbed their nose at people wanting higher capacity versions. This is especially the case when it is now obvious that Apple has a source for high capacity flash devices at reasonable price. This reminds me of the AIR boondoggle in that they have focused on form over function. It is almost like they don't know what they are selling here, Touch is much more than an MP3 player thus space is real important. You can chew through a lot of space just with a few games and apps. It is almost like Apple hasn't grasped the fact that they are in the game machine business and don't have the cartridge model to support multiple games on the platform. That is the only practical place to store your games on a flash based device like Touch is on the device. After all of this one has to consider a movie or two on the device. It all adds up to way to little flash.

How about giving some examples of "innovative apps" that would take advantage of Bluetooth? Since the touch is not a phone, adding Bluetooth would be useless. No one would use Bluetooth for data transfer, it is too slow. WiFi, on the other hand, would be great for transfers, and the Touch already offers that feature. I don't think Bluetooth headphones would be that popular because it would be another battery that would go dead. No headphones, no music.

So where is your evidence to prove Apple can get high capacity flash at reasonable prices? With today's economy, no one will be willing to drop $500 or more for a high capacity Touch. Apple still charges $599 for 64 GB flash memory in the MacBook Air. Doesn't sound like they are getting memory at reasonable prices.

You can chew through a lot of space with a few games and apps? You're kidding, right? I have 16 apps/games on my iPhone that use 200 MB! Those hardly make a dent on my 16 GB iPhone, and would be nothing on the 32 GB Touch, even with movies and music. You don't need to keep ALL of them on the Touch at the same time.

People want low prices. If Apple had released a 64 GB Touch, I am sure you would have complained about the price.
post #26 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Not the speaker - the sound through the headphones!

Ah, you are correct. However, none of the iPods have ever really had significant changes with sound quality, which is probably why they referenced the original reviews instead of mentioning the same thing twice. They stuck with the new features instead.
post #27 of 94
Aaah, now thats a good review, well detailed and clearly show the difference between iPhone and iPod Touch, before the iPhone 3G and Touch 2G, my friends will say its pointless to own a Touch, now I think they will think twice before saying that .

Although I will still prefer the iPhone 3G anyday, when will it be in Malaysia!!!!, please be this year .
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post #28 of 94
Will the new Touch deliver music to my stereo through Airport Express via Wi-Fi?
post #29 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

albeit in polished aluminum characteristic of the iPod line),

That would be "albeit in a stainless steel back, characteristic of the iPod line".
post #30 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You can, but not out of the box or via an iTunes setting. Air Shaing will allow you mount it as a wireless drive on a LAN. It's still free, I'd get it before it jumps to $7.

Air Sharing is a great little app.

New favorite apps for my touch (in no particular order):

Twitteriffic
Mobile News
Bloomberg
Othello
Aurora Feint
BiiBall
PocketConstitution
Epocrates Rx
Lonely Planet Mandarin
AOL Radio
ITM MidiLab (the coolest thing since MIDI...works with GarageBand!)
YouTube (standard app)

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post #31 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorotea View Post

I wish it had either GPS or a Camera. And of course more space (64gb)

I'd pay more for these features.

The lack of a GPS option was a dumb decision on Apple's part. Obviously, they want GPS to drive iPhone sales, but it instead has the effect of driving people to Garmin or Tom Tom (and others) instead. Sometimes I'd like to throttle the people making the final product adjustments.

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post #32 of 94
Quote:
you simply state objectively how it sounds.

and exactly how DO you do that "objectively"?

- do you use the craptastic iPod headphones? in which it will sound just as crap as anything else does thru them.
- do you use some kind of arcane "audiophile" equipment that no one can afford or would realistically use on a PORTABLE player?
- what bitrate do you sample to... or do you propose using AAC (which almost no one does)?

and so on, and so on, and so on.

dude it's a portable listening device, generally used by the vast majority of the listening public to listen to lossy frickin mp3s ripped god-knew-how-many-times, whilst the listener is jogging/biking/running/eating/on the loud-assed subway.

Arguing about sound quality on an iPod is about as pointless as those moronic kids who install a 300w stereo system in their beater, everything-rattles-on-it hooptie car.

If you want a great sound experience go shut yourself in a soundproof room and listen to vinyl on your tube amp. To me all digital players playing a lossy format thru earbuds sound the same: fairly meh. Not completely crappy but it for sure isn't the Metropolitan Opera.

this is not, however, stopping me from buying them for their intended use: as a PORTABLE listening device. For use in (typically) noisy environments.
post #33 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by macapptraining View Post

apple should really start advertising the ipod touch as a gaming device.

No need. The top-selling apps in the App Store are already games. The market decided.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #34 of 94
Any thoughts on why the camera continues to be absent?
post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix01 View Post

Any thoughts on why the camera continues to be absent?

Really?

Because it's not an iPhone.
post #36 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix01 View Post

Any thoughts on why the camera continues to be absent?

Because Steve says so. He giveth and taketh- always leaves you wanting more.
post #37 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Ah, you are correct. However, none of the iPods have ever really had significant changes with sound quality, which is probably why they referenced the original reviews instead of mentioning the same thing twice. They stuck with the new features instead.

I asked only because they've changed chips in the past which resulted in a downgrade in quality. Check out the diff between Shuffle 1G and 2G- big difference.
iLounge.com has reported that the sound has been improved on this new Touch over the last one as well as the screen image.
post #38 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Because Steve says so. He giveth and taketh- always leaves you wanting more.

Well there is some truth to that.

The article said "theres not much room for growth in this good product"

so apple (i think) is leaving out GPS, a camera, etc. so they can add them into future options (and retain these or similar price points) to drive sales of the touch for the next few years

interestingly enough I think a Touch with a camera, GPS and wi-fi would function as well as a phone for many people, if there was a skype application, so maybe they are afraid of usurping the iPhone
post #39 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Why just one photo comparing it with the previous generation?



I thought the graphics were more than competitive for the size, about as good as the PSP or so.


I love my brand new 32 gb Ipod touch. The only warning I can give is wait until the cases come out-- the back scratches very easily and cases aren't yet available!!!
post #40 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

The lack of a GPS option was a dumb decision on Apple's part. Obviously, they want GPS to drive iPhone sales, but it instead has the effect of driving people to Garmin or Tom Tom (and others) instead. Sometimes I'd like to throttle the people making the final product adjustments.

The iPhone isn't simply using GPS. Assisted GPS requires a constant data connection. Which the Touch does not have.
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