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Apple cuts off unofficial avenue for rebuffed iPhone apps - Page 4

post #121 of 137
Yay Apple! Yay ANY COMPANY that defends itself from pirates and hackers.

After just two weeks of using my original iPhone I knew that I would never want to be without one again. I have come to depend on this "computer-in-my-pocket" so much that I absolutely want Apple to maintain very strict control over who gets to put what on my most valuable accessory.

No wonder pirates don't like the App Store. Good ridden to them all and good luck to the Google phone users who will get them. They are more than welcome to "develop" for jailbroken iPhones too, since that's where they really belong - not in the legitimate App Store.

As an iPhone customer I am strongly depending on Apple to maintain high standards and safety when it comes to allowing 3rd party applications access to my device. If not Apple, then just who exactly?

And it's foolish to expect Apple to carry competing hardware/software in it's very own store (even a virtual one)? Nobody does that! Let's face it, some developers were just hoping for a free ride on the iPhone's success. Apple's success. Geesh.


p.s. (As a side note - It was my understanding that the whole "ad-hoc" distribution method was intended to allow businesses to distribute their software for the iPhone just to their own employees, and not the general public. Not as a second form of commercial distribution for an un-approved application...)
post #122 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

Time will tell.

BR doesn't have much time. Its estimated that by 2010 music downloads will surpass CD sales. Video sales are following the same path as downloads and video on demand grows.
post #123 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by YodaMac View Post

Yay Apple! Yay ANY COMPANY that defends itself from pirates and hackers.

Too bad you don't know what pirates and hackers are. "Hacker" almost fits in this case, though a bit of a reach, but pirates, not at all. The meanings of those words aren't "people who do high-tech things that I don't like".

Quote:
As an iPhone customer I am strongly depending on Apple to maintain high standards and safety when it comes to allowing 3rd party applications access to my device. If not Apple, then just who exactly?

Apple doesn't really control what goes on your Mac, has that been causing you any problems? Do you really need Apple to become your electronic nanny? Do you have a hard time telling what software is good and what isn't? The system isn't really to protect you, it's a lot more to protect the carrier than anything else.
post #124 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

BR doesn't have much time. Its estimated that by 2010 music downloads will surpass CD sales. Video sales are following the same path as downloads and video on demand grows.

Sorry I disagree.

Bandwidth caps and slow internet speeds in many areas of the country will keep BR around for a while. A long while.

I think there is a a subtle difference between the music industry and the video industry. Music downloads exploded because of MP3 players and the desire of consumers to have their music collection, or a portion of it, available 'on the go'. To certain extent people want to take video content with them but I don't think that's a big demand. What will drive video contnent sales ,IMO, is quality not portability. When you spend $2000 or more for a 1080p wide screen set, you're looking for the highest quality content you can find. That's not downloaded video content right now and I think it will be a while before you can download a movie with the same quality as a blue ray movie.
post #125 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

Sorry mdriftmeyer, but I think that it WRITES AND READS DVD/CD and only READS Blu-Ray discs http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827129016

No s***. The price cuts the current BluRay ROM readers in half if it's for $99.
post #126 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Also OS X doesn't support BR DRM. Without that their is no way to watch BR movies on a Mac.

I suppose you both have reading comprehension issues. I stated that the best way to explode the BluRay market is to cut the current player prices, in two markets [home theater and consumer desktop], in half.

The market is 90% Windows. Driving the price down will open the flood gates.

OS X will then be sure to include BluRay DRM support, as an add-on from SONY or other authorized representatives for use.

Apple will then offer BTO options for BluRay and release an incremental update in their pro suite of apps to adjust for this as well.
post #127 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

Sorry I disagree. Bandwidth caps and slow internet speeds in many areas of the country will keep BR around for a while. A long while.

BR advocates lean on this too heavily as an excuse. Bandwidth caps are currently small experiments. Not wide spread at all. And are largely up for debate. ISP want to curb abuse of the system and still debating what is normal use and what is abuse.

Competition for internet service will only increase forcing everyone to improve capacity and speed. Competition not only between wired ISP but wireless as well.

HD cable for the most part is good enough. It fills the HD screen with decent image. HD Video on Demand is cheaper and more convenient than BR.

Quote:
I think there is a a subtle difference between the music industry and the video industry. Music downloads exploded because of MP3 players and the desire of consumers to have their music collection, or a portion of it, available 'on the go'. To certain extent people want to take video content with them but I don't think that's a big demand. What will drive video contnent sales ,IMO, is quality not portability. When you spend $2000 or more for a 1080p wide screen set, you're looking for the highest quality content you can find. That's not downloaded video content right now and I think it will be a while before you can download a movie with the same quality as a blue ray movie.

For the past 20 years video has closely followed audio in media playback. Tape, to disk, to digital file.

You give the average consumer way too much credit with their taste in quality. MP3 proved for most people quality is near the bottom of priorities. People don't purchase on quality. They purchase on what is good enough, convinient, and cheap.
post #128 of 137
[QUOTE=TenoBell;1313858]
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

BR advocates lean on this too heavily as an excuse.

Perhaps because there's a lot of truth in it.

Look Verizon with FIOS and Comcast are the only major players I'm aware of that offer the *really* fast broadband service that could make hi def downlaoded video content a good experience for users. Even they are doing so somewhat cautiously. Do you really think they will have their high speed broadband service available in all of the markets they serve by 2010 (the time you suggest that blue ray will fade away)? I doubt they will offer it in most of the markets they serve. What about consumers NOT served by Verizon and Comcast? Where is the fast broadband service from ATT? They don't even offer 10 megabit service in my area and won't say when they WILL.

Not everyone in America lives in New York city.
post #129 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

For the past 20 years video has closely followed audio in media playback. Tape, to disk, to digital file.

You give the average consumer way too much credit with their taste I'm quality. MP3 proved for most people quality is near the bottom of priorities. People don't purchase on quality. They purchase on what is good enough, convinient, and cheap.

I agree with the first part of your statement. But I think video will 'stray' from audio going forward.

Why get a 1080p set if all your going to view is 480 content? Granted Apple does offer 720p content which is still good. But I think consumers will want better. I know I do.
post #130 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

I suppose you both have reading comprehension issues. I stated that the best way to explode the BluRay market is to cut the current player prices, in two markets [home theater and consumer desktop], in half.

I understand what you are saying. Your logic is based upon a long stream of "What Ifs", that are not likely to happen any time soon.
post #131 of 137
[QUOTE=backtomac;1313865]
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post


Perhaps because there's a lot of truth in it.

Look Verizon with FIOS and Comcast are the only major players I'm aware of that offer the *really* fast broadband service that could make hi def downlaoded video content a good experience for users. Even they are doing so somewhat cautiously. Do you really think they will have their high speed broadband service available in all of the markets they serve by 2010 (the time you suggest that blue ray will fade away)? I doubt they will offer it in most of the markets they serve. What about consumers NOT served by Verizon and Comcast? Where is the fast broadband service from ATT? They don't even offer 10 megabit service in my area and won't say when they WILL.

Not everyone in America lives in New York city.

I never said BR will fade out by 2010. It's estimated music download sales will pass CD sales by 2010. Nothing will fade.

You are correct to stream 1080P to your television requires a great deal of bandwidth and speed. To develop a media downloading culture doesn't require all of that. People 25 and under will be more used to consuming online content than people 30 and over. When people 25 and under today become the 30 and over tomorrow. They will be a much larger market for online content and the really fast broadband speeds will be more ubiquitous.
post #132 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

Why get a 1080p set if all your going to view is 480 content? Granted Apple does offer 720p content which is still good. But I think consumers will want better. I know I do.

BR isn't the only option for 1080 content. You can watch 1080 broadcast television and cable.

When most people look at a $100 upconverting DVD player vs $400 BR player. $12 DVD vs $30 BR. The quality of upconverted DVD is good enough that the advantages of BR are not worth twice the price for most people. Which is why DVD sales are 90% - BR 10%
post #133 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

I understand what you are saying. Your logic is based upon a long stream of "What Ifs", that are not likely to happen any time soon.

The moment BluRay won, the vendors offered systems at half their original price points. They now have to cut it again. That's not a lot of What-ifs.

If Apple suddenly stalls with my price points then it's clear they're sandbagging and waiting to push a truly digital only solution.

Fortunately, they're not stupid and know that both the consumer bandwidth and professional demands require them to embrace BluRay.
post #134 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

BR isn't the only option for 1080 content. You can watch 1080 broadcast television and cable.

When most people look at a $100 upconverting DVD player vs $400 BR player. $12 DVD vs $30 BR. The quality of upconverted DVD is good enough that the advantages of BR are not worth twice the price for most people. Which is why DVD sales are 90% - BR 10%

DirecTV: http://www.directv.com/DTVAPP/global...setId=P4580004

Excerpts:

Quote:
Do you have any concern that as HD becomes more widespread, this type of original programming will dissipate?

No, I don't think this will change any time soon, because there will be a lot of competition. So I think they'll continue to push the envelope.

So HD is going to keep networks on their toes.

Yes. Everyone involved in high definition has to take more care. Now, with HD, the sets can't look amateurish. If the set design is not well done, the high definition will expose it.

Do you think all shows will soon be in HD five to ten years from now?

Maybe in ten, but not in five. Some networks are not ready to make that commitment. Most sports and major network shows will be in HD.

DirecTV's current HD Receiver: http://www.directv.com/DTVAPP/global...setId=P4380066

Quote:
Features

High definition (mpeg-2, mpeg-4) and standard definition (mpeg-2) enabled. View the best in both HD and SD programming.
1 satellite tuner to access DIRECTV programming.
7-day Advanced Program Guide®. Search the channel guide for shows up to 7 days in advance.
Search for your favorite shows by person, title, keyword or channel.
Customize guide by choosing only the channels you want to see.
Choose your screen format: full screen, stretched, letterbox, pillar box or crop mode.
480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i picture output and multiple screen formats supported.
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound capable. Listen to superb theater-quality sound with additional hardware.
Take advantage of multiple connection ports: HDMI, Component, S-Video, Composite, Optical Audio outputs.
View and log Caller ID info provided by your local phone company.*
Parental controls/locks: Enjoy peace of mind over what your children are watching by locking out objectionable programming.

Dish Network:

HD Receiver: http://www.dishnetwork.com/content/o...vr/index.shtml

Quote:
The ViP222™ is an advanced MPEG-4 dual-tuner high definition satellite receiver that lets you enjoy vivid picture depth and dramatic color on two independent televisions.


Supports two TVs – one HDTV and one
SDTV

TV1 display supports four resolutions:
480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i
SD content is up-converted.
HD and SD output is simultaneous.

TV2 display resolution is 480i
HD content is down-converted

Two Satellite tuners allow you to select
from two viewing options
Single Mode: Picture-In-Picture (PIP)
available on any TV
Dual Mode: Independently view
programming on two televisions

Supports Dolby® Digital 5.1 Surround
Sound

Widescreen Electronic Program Guide
with easy search features

Convenient On-Screen Caller ID3 with
history

DishHOME Interactive TV for watching six
screens at once and on demand
entertainment, games, shopping, news,
sports, weather and customer service

NEITHER HAS 1080p PROGRAMMING.

According to Engadget: http://www.engadgethd.com/2008/07/28...80p-movies-la/

Quote:
DirecTV to boast 130 HD channels on August 14th, 1080p movies later this year

Since they don't offer 1080p Receivers, I can't wait to see the bitch session when people are forced to resign up for contracts and pay an upgrade fee to replace their current offering.

I'm quite happy to wait until after February 2009 to upgrade.
post #135 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

No s***. The price cuts the current BluRay ROM readers in half if it's for $99.

BS. You thought that it was a Blu-Ray writer. I thought I was being nice pointing it out to you. AH!
post #136 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

BS. You thought that it was a Blu-Ray writer. I thought I was being nice pointing it out to you. AH!

HorseS*** numbnuts. You wanna blow smoke somewhere, turn it inwards.

Quote:
Computer BluRay ROM/DVD-DL Burner @$99 will sky rocket sales.

Learn to read.
post #137 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

The simple fact is the app store is a huge playground. There is plenty of room to play for everyone. There will always be those who like to push the boundaries and will veer too close to the electric fence. Well these guys got what they deserved. Make apps that are well within the acceptable range of common sense and developers can make a lot of money. Try to challenge Apple from within their own playpen and you can expect to get burned.

Good apps push boundaries.
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