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Apple to unleash first builds of Snow Leopard since WWDC - Page 2

post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bregalad View Post

If you show your buyers that their products will be rendered obsolete in a time frame that is shorter than customer expectations then you alienate then.

Logically, that's how it should happen but with Apple it seems to be different. They have switched from OS9 to OS X in 2000 and from PPC to Intel in 2005. These were huge changes - in 5 years, OS 9 apps were made largely obsolete. To switch to Intel-only in 2009 would only mean obsoleting 4 year old hardware and it's not really obsoleting it as it can still be used for the job it was used for the previous years. It's well outside of warranty anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bregalad View Post

I'm still on PPC mostly because I'm struggling to pay the bills every month. In addition my G5 tower is still fast enough for everything I do and has plenty of RAM and storage capacity so I really don't need anything new. I'm now thinking my jump to Intel will take place when 10.6.1 is released.

That's what I think a lot of people will do, which is why I think them discontinuing PPC is one of the best things they can do for profit. It will force people who don't want to be left behind to let go of older hardware. When you spread the cost of a new computer over the course of a 4 yearly upgrade, even an entry level Mac Pro will cost about the same as your phone bills over that period of time so it's a fairly inexpensive item.

Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder

So is there anything more official about whether PPC support will be dropped in 10.6?

I still haven't seen anything beyond speculation, has apple actually said anything either way?

Magic 8-ball says: All signs point to yes.

I don't think it's explicitly stated that the final version won't have PPC support but the developer release didn't:

http://www.macnn.com/articles/08/06/...rd.intel.only/

If they intended to continue PPC support, I imagine they would have done so from the beginning. Supporting 32-bit and 64-bit is hard enough without adding 32-bit and 64-bit PPC into the mix. Plus they are focussing on optimization and reducing OS X's footprint. The PPC bloat takes up about 2GB:

http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~pxk/cs/osx-space.html

If their aim is to lower the footprint, this stuff has to go. It'll be interesting to see what stage Snow Leopard is at in terms of performance and footprint.

Supposedly Apple were maintaining internal PPC builds but who knows. They could separate them into two releases - that isn't quite the same as multiple Windows versions as each release only targets one set of hardware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT

So for those of us waiting to buy new Macbooks this October, will we see the benefits of later upgrading to Snow Leopard on our hardware?

If they do what I hope they will do and finally go with all dedicated graphics chipsets then I would say yes, you should see a benefit. Not necessarily in 3rd party apps at first but core elements like Quicktime and apps depending on Core libraries. Even in the worst case, if you don't benefit from 10.6, you'll at least benefit from SSE4 in the new processors somewhere.
post #42 of 43
[QUOTE=GregAlexander;1315965]Yes millions will upgrade anyway. And Apple must be working on making the new system not just stable and ready for the future - but able to use all the old stuff without a hitch. I just don't know enough to say whether that's possible. Apple can rewrite drivers for all their own hardware so that's fine - do peripheral drivers need rewrites? Are there things that can not be made compatible no matter how much effort?[quote]

This is a problem MS has had with their 64 nit version. a completely 64 bit OS needs 64 bit drivers. But MS needed to make those drives (I forget the term) "confirmed" for security purposes, so like apps getting into the new app store, MS has to check them out first. Anyway, there were lots of problems. Hopefully, Apple's model will be better than that. It's great not being first.

Quote:
So yeah millions will upgrade - but will Apple released it at WWDC and talk up all the great underlying technologies for developers while deliberately warning off consumers? It's not going to stop people like us wanting to have a go, and telling regular users not to buy it will just get more headlines about Apple.

I think Apple will do what they always do, try to prevent more than a few things from breaking. I don't see how they can allow major apps like CS4, Office, their own pro apps, etc. to break again. It's way too soon after the last time.

Quote:
They could easily offer a choice of 10.5 or 10.6 on new computers too. Hell I don't know what they'll end up doing, just what they've said so far sounds like they're playing it like the Intel transition (which means that yes they are saying how good it'll be, but they're also aware of problems and want to make it smooth).

I don't see it as being required. There's a lot of talk about this "breaking" apps by those who apparently don't know what's going on. I just don't see it happening.

Quote:
If Microsoft had made Vista look and feel identical to XP and told people it was their platform for the future but that average users should hold of because it was SO GOOD that it broke compatibility with lots of apps... they would have got vastly different press and interest. (And sold millions anyway). And a year later they could have pushed a new interface and features.

MS hs problems that Apple doesn't have right now.

I've been wondering why Apple is refusing to push into enterprise and government with the Mac, they way they seem to be interested in doing with the iPhone platform.

My thoughts are that Apple doesn't want to do that until 10.6 is out. It's different enough that very likely while "standard" apps won't be affected much, the very specialized, and OS dependent business apps that most large companies write for themselves, could be. Also, features in the 10.6 regarding multiple cores will move the OS into bigger servers, and otherwise more powerful machines. Business has not been very receptive to Apple's servers because there is no upgrade path. That's important to them, and until this, the OS hasn't been very multicore friendly.

After 10.6, I really do believe that Apple will push more in that direction.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

So for those of us waiting to buy new Macbooks this October, will we see the benefits of later upgrading to Snow Leopard on our hardware?

Yes, all Macs with Core 2 Duo (or later) CPUs will benefit from Snow Leopard.
Mac user since August 1983.
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Mac user since August 1983.
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