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iPhone tops business rankings, steals Nokia market share

post #1 of 131
Thread Starter 
Often labeled the outsider in the corporate world, Apple's iPhone has already reached the top of J.D. Power's satisfaction ranks for business smartphones -- and is simultaneously the second-largest smartphone maker in the world.

Owners contributing to the product ratings company's yearly study gave Apple top marks among all the smartphone manufacturers operating in the US for its 2008 satisfaction report, awarding it a score of 778 out of 800, rising well above second-place Research in Motion's 703 for its BlackBerry phones and further still past the industry average of 681.

Expectedly, the iPhone performs best with ease of use, feature set and design, all elements J.D. Power says are essential to a good smartphone. Of the top five reasons for picking a phone, 45 percent of those involved in the study cited Apple's strength, Internet access, as their primary reason. Email (41 percent), design (39 percent), Bluetooth support (37 percent) and keyboard layouts (also 37 percent) played similar roles.

And while Samsung has nearly tied RIM in satisfaction with its own lineup, the major makers sitting below the average were those who use Windows Mobile heavily or exclusively for their smartphones, such as HTC and Motorola. Palm, which uses both its own Palm OS and Windows Mobile, has trailed well behind the pack with a score of just 644.

The result was telling for Apple, which failed to rank at all in the 2007 report but is now the best-rated in its home country.

Not all was positive for Apple: while the average asking price for a smartphone was $216, the Cupertino, Calif.-based newcomer's average purchase price was highest at $337. This stems in part from purchases before the launch of the iPhone 3G, when most customers would have paid $400 or more. Motorola's phones were the least expensive at $169.

The award for the top spot among workers comes as researchers at Canalys confirmed that Apple is now the second-largest smartphone producer in terms of volume. Its nearly 6.9 million iPhones shipped during the summer gave it 17.3 percent of the market during the period and validated Apple's eagerness to tout that it had outsold the BlackBerry for the first time. RIM's phone represented 15.2 percent of world smartphone market share.



Apple's sharp, sudden push into the highest ranks has had a ripple effect on incumbents as a result. Of al those hurt, the worst affected is Nokia, which saw its lead erode from a commanding 51.4 percent in summer of last year to 38.9 percent in the wake of iPhone 3G's launch. Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.

And as with J.D. Power's study, Microsoft has also taken a bruising. Represented by the collective number of Windows Mobile smartphones, the software developer now sits in a modest fourth place with 13.6 percent of the market to itself.
post #2 of 131
1. Iphone is not a smartphone.

2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years
post #3 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Iphone is not a smartphone.

2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years

1. Yes, it is. Although there is no agreed industry definition for "smartphone", the iPhone (note the capitalisation) matches or surpasses all the definitions out there in terms of features and capabilities.

2. You probably have actaully.
post #4 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Iphone is not a smartphone.

2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years

Right..
post #5 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Often labeled the outsider in the corporate world, Apple's iPhone has already reached the top of J.D. Power's satisfaction ranks for business smartphones -- and is simultaneously the second-largest smartphone maker in the world.

Owners contributing to the product ratings company's yearly study gave Apple top marks among all the smartphone manufacturers operating in the US for its 2008 satisfaction report, awarding it a score of 778 out of 800, rising well above second-place Research in Motion's 703 for its BlackBerry phones and further still past the industry average of 681.

Expectedly, the iPhone performs best with ease of use, feature set and design, all elements J.D. Power says are essential to a good smartphone. Of the top five reasons for picking a phone, 45 percent of those involved in the study cited Apple's strength, Internet access, as their primary reason. Email (41 percent), design (39 percent), Bluetooth support (37 percent) and keyboard layouts (also 37 percent) played similar roles.

And while Samsung has nearly tied RIM in satisfaction with its own lineup, the major makers sitting below the average were those who use Windows Mobile heavily or exclusively for their smartphones, such as HTC and Motorola. Palm, which uses both its own Palm OS and Windows Mobile, has trailed well behind the pack with a score of just 644.

The result was telling for Apple, which failed to rank at all in the 2007 report but is now the best-rated in its home country.

Not all was positive for Apple: while the average asking price for a smartphone was $216, the Cupertino, Calif.-based newcomer's average purchase price was highest at $337. This stems in part from purchases before the launch of the iPhone 3G, when most customers would have paid $400 or more. Motorola's phones were the least expensive at $169.

The award for the top spot among workers comes as researchers at Canalys confirmed that Apple is now the second-largest smartphone producer in terms of volume. Its nearly 6.9 million iPhones shipped during the summer gave it 17.3 percent of the market during the period and validated Apple's eagerness to tout that it had outsold the BlackBerry for the first time. RIM's phone represented 15.2 percent of world smartphone market share.



Apple's sharp, sudden push into the highest ranks has had a ripple effect on incumbents as a result. Of al those hurt, the worst affected is Nokia, which saw its lead erode from a commanding 51.4 percent in summer of last year to 38.9 percent in the wake of iPhone 3G's launch. Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.

And as with J.D. Power's study, Microsoft has also taken a bruising. Represented by the collective number of Windows Mobile smartphones, the software developer now sits in a modest fourth place with 13.6 percent of the market to itself.


Hmmm......

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartphone
post #6 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phizz View Post

1. Yes, it is. Although there is no agreed industry definition for "smartphone", the iPhone (note the capitalisation) matches or surpasses all the definitions out there in terms of features and capabilities.

2. You probably have actaully.

1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):

View and edit: Word and Excel.
View: PDF
Copy and paste
Transfer files back and forth with other devices through bluetooth
Be able to connect to other computing devices through bluetooth

Not sure which of these the iphone can and cannot do, I'll leave that up to someone else.

2. Possibly in the case at a mall kiosk or something, but I have never seen one in an actual persons possession in the last 5 years.
post #7 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Iphone is not a smartphone.

2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years

Half the phones sold in the world are made by a company called Nokia, I can only assume you have no clue about technology.
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post #8 of 131
Only a matter of time... Apple, Inc. will be renamed, "iPhone, Inc."

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #9 of 131
While Nokia is losing marketshare in the US, they are not a US-based company. Nokia has publicly stated the areas in which they are behind and have taken many efforts to adapt to these changes. I see no reason to believe that Nokia's expertise in cellphones and their recent acquisition of Symbian and Qt, with a partnership with FF will not have Nokia a leading mobile OS in Europe in the next year or so. Whatever you think of Nokia, counting them out of the running is like counting Apple out of the running back in the late 90s.
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post #10 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Iphone is not a smartphone.

I'm a PC!

Quote:
2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years

You ought to get out more!
post #11 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):

Everyone can craft their own definition for what THEY want from a smartphone. If they wish to come up with a definition that leads them away from an iPhone, that's fair enough. But that personal definition won't extend to everyone.

My definition would be simpler: a phone that is capable of running software, using both text and GUI input. (In other words, a numeric pad alone is not enough.) I wouldn't even demand Internet access, any more than I would include that in the definition of a personal computer. However, Internet access is one of the things that makes a good and useful smartphone as opposed to a poor one.
post #12 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more):

View and edit: Word and Excel.
View: PDF
Copy and paste
Transfer files back and forth with other devices through bluetooth
Be able to connect to other computing devices through bluetooth

Not sure which of these the iphone can and cannot do, I'll leave that up to someone else.

Well you seem to be going by your own definition in that case (and you've also admitted that you are "not sure" which features it has/doesn't have anyway). I can confirm the iPhone does have your first two (except edit Word files- that is not a phone's job), does not have the third (yet), and I too am unsure about its Bluetooth features as I don't use them.

I'd still call it a smartphone. Saying it is not a smartphone because of lack of copy and paste (for example) is like saying a car is not technically a car because it doesn't have ABS braking. Damn useful, but not essential.
post #13 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Symbian, which powers all of Nokia's phones, also took a tumble from its presence on 68.1 percent of all shipping phones to 46.6 percent.

Umm, Symbian does not power all of Nokias phones
post #14 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

1. Smartphone needs to off the top of my head (will think of more).

How about......

Have a 'real' keyboard
Fm radio
Play subscription music
Smell (a little bit) like peanut butter
Run Mojave OS
Have a 360 page manual
Make me feel important
Not be an iPhone

Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)
post #15 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

While Nokia is losing marketshare in the US, they are not a US-based company. Nokia has publicly stated the areas in which they are behind and have taken many efforts to adapt to these changes. I see no reason to believe that Nokia's expertise in cellphones and their recent acquisition of Symbian and Qt, with a partnership with FF will not have Nokia a leading mobile OS in Europe in the next or so. Whatever you think of Nokia, counting them out of the running is like counting Apple out of the running back in the late 90s.

I'm mostly in agreement with your posts, but I'm fairly convinced of Nokia's demise. Unless they back Android in a big way I think they will slip off the radar sharpish.
post #16 of 131
The bluetooth support (37%) is hilarious to me.

This being the phone that only connects to Apple's headset?
post #17 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post

How about......

Have a 'real' keyboard
Fm radio
Play subscription music
Smell (a little bit) like peanut butter
Run Mojave OS
Have a 360 page manual
Make me feel important
Not be an iPhone

Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)

Dueces just joined and is a troll.
post #18 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Only a matter of time... Apple, Inc. will be renamed, "iPhone, Inc."


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post #19 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Half the phones sold in the world are made by a company called Nokia, I can only assume you have no clue about technology.

Well I live in the US. I have had Sprint, Verizon, and Nextel the last 9 years. I have had well over 60 different cell phones personally and am generally considered a cell phone expert by people who know me. I can and have disassembled thousands of cell phones. From 2001-2003 I ran a service where people sent me their cell phones and I modded them, which made me about $20,000 a year in my spare time,

I have never had GSM service (ATT/Tmobile) cause frankly the call quality is horrible and the data network is worse than a 3rd world countries network.

While I have never had ATT/Tmobile, obviously I have known people who have and out of all of them, and out of all random people I have observed on the street, I have not seen a Nokia phone with my own eyes in the last 5 years.
post #20 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post


Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)

/Holding nose/

Please don't..... thanks.
post #21 of 131
What's amazing to me is that the satisfaction gap between Apple and the next highest rated (RIM) is larger than the gap between RIM and the last place finisher (Palm). 75 vs 69! It really demonstrates how far ahead Apple really is.

If Apple steadily keeps upgrading the iPhone OS and keeps the App Store growing, other vendors will be hard pressed to close that gap.
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post #22 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Only a matter of time... Apple, Inc. will be renamed, "iPhone, Inc."


and you're actually happy with that?
post #23 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

and you're actually happy with that?

Kool-aid drinkers are neither happy nor sad, they just drink and drink, and drink. Emotions hardly ever come into it. No time. Drinking and following the party like are all that matter.
post #24 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

and you're actually happy with that?

Sure, why not?

There are far more mobile devices then desktop or laptops. Most of them don't happen to be smartphones right now, but it's moving in that direction.

The desktop/laptop market is over. Apple will always be a niche player there. However, the portable device market is still wide open. That's where the real future is.

And since the iPhone runs OSX, whatever Apple does for the iPhone can potentially come back for the Mac too.

So I dunno where this hostility (not necessarily from you teckstud, but from others in this forum and elsewhere) is for Apple doing devices other then the "Mac". They need to move beyond just desktops and laptops if they are going to remain viable for the long term.
post #25 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Everyone can craft their own definition for what THEY want from a smartphone. If they wish to come up with a definition that leads them away from an iPhone, that's fair enough. But that personal definition won't extend to everyone.

My definition would be simpler: a phone that is capable of running software, using both text and GUI input. (In other words, a numeric pad alone is not enough.) I wouldn't even demand Internet access, any more than I would include that in the definition of a personal computer. However, Internet access is one of the things that makes a good and useful smartphone as opposed to a poor one.

Start your own Wiki page.
post #26 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Sure, why not?

There are far more mobile devices then desktop or laptops. Most of them don't happen to be smartphones right now, but it's moving in that direction.

The desktop/laptop market is over. Apple will always be a niche player there. However, the portable device market is still wide open. That's where the real future is.

And since the iPhone runs OSX, whatever Apple does for the iPhone can potentially come back for the Mac too.

So I dunno where this hostility (not necessarily from you teckstud, but from others in this forum and elsewhere) is for Apple doing devices other then the "Mac". They need to move beyond just desktops and laptops if they are going to remain viable for the long term.

All of your points are valid and right on the mark. I think the hostility is not directed at Apple so much as it is the Apple fanclub, or Appleistas, or Apple Nazi's to name a few. Apple is a great company that makes great products. Nothing wrong here. The problem comes in when you have stupid comments like: "Apple rulz, all other suck", or "Apple will take over the world", or "the iPhone is the best in the world and your phone sucks", and so on. Apple is a company like Microsoft. Apple's aim it to get you to pay as much as bearable while offering as little as possible to keep you happy. Apple is not in biz to be your friend. Similarly, it can be said that the iPhone is not much more than an iPod that can make calls. While I tend to agree with this, there are others that truely believe the iPhone is the "Jesus Phone" and all other companies should simply go out of biz. The truth is most likely somewhere in the middle. The iPhone does many, many things well, will also failing miserably at many other things. The middle again. Personally, I have an iPhone 3G and had the original. They provided decent functionality but in the issues that were/are critical to me, the iPhone fails miserably. However, I found a solution that works. I keep my iPhone as a converted iPhone to iPod (removed the sim) and have a Nokia for my telephone needs.
post #27 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

Well I live in the US. I have had Sprint, Verizon, and Nextel the last 9 years. I have had well over 60 different cell phones personally and am generally considered a cell phone expert by people who know me. I can and have disassembled thousands of cell phones. From 2001-2003 I ran a service where people sent me their cell phones and I modded them, which made me about $20,000 a year in my spare time,

I have never had GSM service (ATT/Tmobile) cause frankly the call quality is horrible and the data network is worse than a 3rd world countries network.

While I have never had ATT/Tmobile, obviously I have known people who have and out of all of them, and out of all random people I have observed on the street, I have not seen a Nokia phone with my own eyes in the last 5 years.

Nokia has a very small to non-existent footprint in the US, and to be honest, they really could abandon the US and still be profitable. This is evident by the fact that they really do not try to compete. Operators could also be playing a small part in this.

The doom sayers predicting Nokia's demise (on this site mostly) should get in line with the others that predictec the same thing or think back to the time when L.M. Ericsson almost bought Nokia back in the very beginning. Last time I looked Nokia is still the most dominant force in mobile phones. They will improvise, adapt, and over come. This is what they do best.
post #28 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbus View Post

The bluetooth support (37%) is hilarious to me.

This being the phone that only connects to Apple's headset?

Isn't that funny. Bluetooth support. I almost passed out from laughing so hard.

By the way, you can connect any headphone (BT) to it.
post #29 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I'm mostly in agreement with your posts, but I'm fairly convinced of Nokia's slow demise. Unless they back Android in a big way I think they will slip off the radar sharpish.

Never going to happen. The demise of Nokia has been predicted for years, even up to the point where L.M. Ericsson almost bought them.

Nokia sells more phones in a day than Apple sells in a month, and when they release their new TS phones, they will be hitting their stride. One thing most of the zealots here forget is that not everyone wants and iPhone.
post #30 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dueces View Post

2. I haven't seen a single person with a Nokia in the last 5 years

I just talked my employer into replacing my old crappy Nokia with an iPhone and the difference is amazing. I could never go back.
post #31 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Umm, Symbian does not power all of Nokias phones

They do power all of the Nokia's smartphones though.

I don't see Nokia going away any time soon.

I know that they've never been fashionable in Silicon Valley but the rest of the world still loves them. They still have a stranglehold on emerging markets like India. They're not going away any time soon even if most Americans don't have visibility of their global impact.
post #32 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by genericposts View Post

Never going to happen. The demise of Nokia has been predicted for years, even up to the point where L.M. Ericsson almost bought them.

Nokia sells more phones in a day than Apple sells in a month, and when they release their new TS phones, they will be hitting their stride. One thing most of the zealots here forget is that not everyone wants and iPhone.

First off I'm not a zealot, I'm a rationalist. The two do not compute together in a sane mind.

And with Nokia, it's already losing market share (on cue as predicted ), but more importantly it's losing influential power, at best it will become the Dell of mobile devices (if its lucky, makes the right decisions, and quick).
To clarify: When I say demise, I do not mean its eventual complete 'call the liquidators' death, I mean a Dellish death, reduced to a meaningless box shifter with significant market share loss from a once high, but high enough for the likes of people on here to always say "but look how many devices they ship" without really grasping the larger picture..
And I'm not saying "everyone wants an iPhone" what I'm saying is "not everyone wants a nokia" . I have been saying for years that as soon as smart phones take off Nokia will go into rapid decline, as they simply do not have the software know how to compete.
post #33 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post

How about......

Have a 'real' keyboard
Fm radio
Play subscription music
Smell (a little bit) like peanut butter
Run Mojave OS
Have a 360 page manual
Make me feel important
Not be an iPhone

Just out the back of my ass(will think of more)

post #34 of 131
When a survey shows that Samsung has nearly the same score as RIM, you know it doesn't really mean much in terms business use. The survey simply indicates that iPhone owners are on average more satisfied with their device, nothing more, nothing less.

As I posted elsewhere, Im sure if you do a similar survey about computer operating systems in businesses, Apple will probably come out on top in terms of satisfaction as well. But does that mean the Mac OS X is a better business OS than Windows or Linux? ABSOLUTELY NOT, of course. It only means that users of that market where the OS X is suitable are very satisfied; and that users of the big majority of businesses where Windows is most suitable are less satisfied. It DOES NOT mean that OS X would be equally suitable for those businesses where Windows is used.

And regarding that comment about the "Dellish death", Dell is far from falling into the realms of insignificance. Last I checked, they are still #2 worlwide (yes, lots of people outside the US use computers too). They are still very profitable. They are still dominant in the corporate market. The only thing not going for them is their stock is "out of flavor". But that is bound to happen as you become a larger company and astronomical growth is no longer possible.
post #35 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by genericposts View Post

I think the hostility is not directed at Apple so much as it is the Apple fanclub, or Appleistas, or Apple Nazi's to name a few.

Why don't you keep all your "kool-aid" vocabulary for a thread where it is relevant. Because this is not it. The reaction you are seeing here is to a newbie hijacking the thread (with his first ever post!) by just being a bit of a twerp!

"iPhone is not a smart phone" So bloody what. There is no agreed definition of "smart'. However every stat that I have seen (Gartner, IDC, NPR, Canalys) puts iPhone in that bracket.
"Never seen a Nokia in 5 years" Guess what? There is a little place called 'The rest of the World'. Even if Deuces has never been there.... he must have heard about it?

There are a lot of people on these boards who have been here a long time. A well thought out reasoned discussion, even an argument is always welcome. Let's have a little bit more of that.
post #36 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intosh View Post

And regarding that comment about the "Dellish death", Dell is far from falling into the realms of insignificance. Last I checked, they are still #2 worlwide (yes, lots of people outside the US use computers too). They are still very profitable.

#2 yet not as profitable as Apple with a meagre 10% (US).
Thats the problem with using the number of shipped devices to compare companies.
Yay they are number 2!.... but in reality who cares, they may as well sell biscuits.

You have to sell an awful lot of rubber dinghy's to buy a bigger pool than the next door neighbor who sells ocean liners.

Though I must admit my use of Dell as an analogy wasn't great.
post #37 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

#2 yet not as profitable as Apple with a meagre 10% (US).
Thats the problem with using the number of shipped devices to compare companies.
Yay they are number 2!.... but in reality who cares, they may as well sell biscuits.

Though I must admit my use of Dell as an analogy wasn't great.

I thought Dell racks up more profit in computer sales than Apple.
How much net income did Apple get from their computers? If we are to compare oranges to oranges, we have compare computer sales.
post #38 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intosh View Post

I thought Dell racks up more profit in computer sales than Apple.
How much net income did Apple get from their computers? If we are to compare oranges to oranges, we have compare computer sales.

Apple should be measured as the complete package, for it's because Nokia & Dell FAIL to have the compete package (though nokia has tried) that it will/has dwindle(d).
post #39 of 131
While I don't really care for market share statistics, it is good to see Apple make it this far in a market where just about every one said they wouldn't succeed and with a product that sits high above all the others in customer satisfaction.

It's also interesting to watch Microsoft slip more and more into irrelevance in this market. Can't say they don't deserve it after Steve Ballmer flapping his big mouth, which he continues to do.
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #40 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Apple should be measured as the complete package, for it's because Nokia & Dell FAIL to have the compete package (though nokia has tried) that it will/has dwindle(d).

Dell and Nokia don't have a presence in the portable media player market, whereas Apple derives a significant chunk of their profit from iPod sales.

To make a fair comparison, you need to compare numbers for competing products. Lumping everything together and then claim Dell and Nokia are failing just on the basis of them being less profitable overall in ridiculous.

Dell is more profitable in computer sales than Apple and Nokia is more profitable in mobile phone sales than Apple. They are hardly failing in my book.
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