or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iPhone seen as still too expensive, losing steam in fall
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

iPhone seen as still too expensive, losing steam in fall - Page 2

post #41 of 116
We won't know 'til apple publishes the next round of figures; I do know that two of my work colleagues here in the UK bought theirs in the last week and haven't stopped gushing about how cool they are; I just smiled indulgently, Buddha-like
post #42 of 116
I think it is seen as expensive but probably by the people who don't fully understand the benefits of the device.

If you buy a Prepay phone, a half decent one is £80. If you buy a GPS device, a decent one is £150. An ipod is £100. If you had to buy them all together, that comes to £330. The prepay iphone is just £350.

It also has great touch navigation, internet everywhere on 3G, which is actually pretty fast when you pick up the signal and some good games.

I actually found the contracts to not be that bad in the UK but they include part of the cost of the phone and the minimum worthwhile one is £35 a month. Over 18 months, that is £630 - £250 iphone subsidy = £380/18 = approx £20 per month for 600 minutes, 500 texts.

I think relative to other carriers, that's actually pretty good value.
post #43 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avions View Post

Until there is an iPhone that doesn't require a data connection, I will stick with my iPod touch + normal phone.

And what precisely would be the purpose of having an iPhone without data.

None of the devices primary features would work unless on Wi-Fi. Which, if you have not noticed is not universally available. Visual voicemail would not work.

Go get a Touch. If you don't want Edge or 3G data - THE DEVICE IS NOT FOR YOU!!!!!!
post #44 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

If you buy a Prepay phone, a half decent one is £80. If you buy a GPS device, a decent one is £150. An ipod is £100. If you had to buy them all together, that comes to £330. The prepay iphone is just £350.

Except you can buy a BT GPS device for as little as 30 and connect it to your phone
post #45 of 116
Unless price evaluations take into account the total cost of ownership this discussion is meaningless. Several countries around the world already offer the handset free of charge.

Retailers could throw "free" $100 notes at customers with every iphone to get them to sign up to a contract. It's all going to be factored into your bill somehow so you better lube up and grit your teeth because telecompanies have pegging down to a fine art.
post #46 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avions View Post

The problem is that the service from AT&T almost doubles my monthly bill.

Until there is an iPhone that doesn't require a data connection, I will stick with my iPod touch + normal phone.

I'm quite sure you can get an iPhone from AT&T without a data plan, but what's the purpose?
bb
Reply
bb
Reply
post #47 of 116
It's really not the cost of the phone that's the problem, it's the cost of two years of ATT service that is the real killer.
post #48 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Expat View Post

I have no problem with the price of the iPhone, I just don't want to switch carriers to get one. Simply put, if Apple ditched their "one carrier per country" policy, they would move a lot of them.

Or unlocked with freedom of choice - but then you would get the whiners again - too expensive.

But the real reaso in very simple, as William Jefferson Clinton once put it "IT'S THE ECONOMY STUPID"

If your phone is working fine and you're not sure about keeping your job you hardly going to splash out on money - especially if the credit crunch means that you actually dont have any money anymore as all your disposable income is used to repay your debts...
post #49 of 116
For me at least, the price of the phone is completely immaterial. It's the cost of using the thing that puts me off.

I live in the UK, and O2, the provider here, has just introduced a "Pay And Go" plan. Unfortunately, that is *not* the same as "Pay As You Go".

I had always said that I would buy an iPhone as soon as I could get a PAYG plan for it, but Pay And Go is simply not it: it's just a cheaper version of the existing contracts, in effect. As far as I can see from the limited information I've been able to find so far, you *have* to top up with a minimum of £10 every month (so, £120 per year minimum), and after the first year you have to top of a further £10 each month to get data services too (which are free for the first year). So, that's £240 per year after the first year. That's a complete and utter joke.

They could give me the iPhone and I still wouldn't have it with that kind of financial commitment. I simply don't make enough use of a mobile phone to make that kind of spending worthwhile, no matter how much I might want an iPhone.

On the other hand, if I could just pay for exactly as much service as I use (even at a relatively high rate), with credit that doesn't expire, I'd be willing to spend a lot on the iPhone itself. Sell me one at a bit more than the price of an iPod Touch, with a true PAYG plan, and I'd buy one tomorrow. I'd happily spend up to, say, £400 on the phone itself under those circumstances. But I will *not* sign myself up to the money-pit that's the current range of contracts, much as I'd like an iPhone.
post #50 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

If you buy a Prepay phone, a half decent one is £80. If you buy a GPS device, a decent one is £150. An ipod is £100. If you had to buy them all together, that comes to £330. The prepay iphone is just £350.

The iPhone doesn't do turn-by-turn navigation so your justification is a little out. However, I agree that £350 including a year's data is a pretty good price.


I wonder how one applies to become an analyst? It doesn't take a rocket surgeon to work out that three things influence the sales of electronics (ignoring macro-economic effects): how new the product is, price and Christmas. The danger of Apple's single model strategy is that there will be massive peaks and troughs in the iPhone's sales and market share.
post #51 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avions View Post

Until there is an iPhone that doesn't require a data connection, I will stick with my iPod touch + normal phone.

Stick with what you have, the whole point of the iPhone is the "always connected" world that it promotes.

If you don't want the data connection and don't really see the benefit of that side of things, you most definitely don't need an iPhone.
post #52 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Hallas View Post

I live in the UK, and O2, the provider here, has just introduced a "Pay And Go" plan. Unfortunately, that is *not* the same as "Pay As You Go".

I had always said that I would buy an iPhone as soon as I could get a PAYG plan for it, but Pay And Go is simply not it: it's just a cheaper version of the existing contracts, in effect. As far as I can see from the limited information I've been able to find so far, you *have* to top up with a minimum of £10 every month (so, £120 per year minimum), and after the first year you have to top of a further £10 each month to get data services too (which are free for the first year). So, that's £240 per year after the first year. That's a complete and utter joke.

Wow, £240 a year, stop being such a tight-ass miser. You'd have been expected to pay £1000+ for that kind of service a year ago, what on earth is your problem.

Also, don't forget you also get the visual voicemail (the only service of its kind in the UK) and "conference calling" (a feature you'd have also had to pay extra at least £10/month).

If you just concentrate on just the numbers you miss the details.
post #53 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Except you can buy a BT GPS device for as little as 30 and connect it to your phone

A BT GPS may not have A-GPS, and certainly not on a 30 device. And BT will drain your battery even faster than having a built-in GPS.
post #54 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNipponese View Post

It's really not the cost of the phone that's the problem, it's the cost of two years of ATT service that is the real killer.

So in summary, the AT&T contract is too expensive, NOT the iPhone.
post #55 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Slow news day?... I agree, analysts should not be given a free pass on their opinions. Their opinion, plus crediting them on AI can equal damage to AAPL stock and reputation.

These analysts have a track record, and they should be called on it, but every bloody time I take AI to task for assuming a journalistic stance but still not quite getting it, I get a note from Kaspar taking umbrage at my comments.

Kaspar, why did you not bother to take an editorial role here and include this analyst's track record as a point of reference to their unfounded comments? I'm honestly interested in what the thinking is here...

Who is the person making the decisions to post stories on AI? That person should be taking a responsible editorial role. I don't think anyone expects "Wall Street Journal" level reporting, but clearly there needs to be an editor assigned... I'd vote for Mel Gross.

I second that, I'm sick of analysts "guesses" (usually bad ones) being presented as "facts", it does nothing but damage the reputations of companies and give them air-time just adds credibility to someone who clearly has no credibility to speak of.

Irresponsible reporting. Stop it!
post #56 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by ichemware View Post

I feel that the iPhone is not overpriced at all. What people are wary about is the phone service, data, text message, add a line, night and weekend minutes extra! Oh, by the way, were gonna stick it to you for 2 years. Even if the damn phone is free people will still not be interested in paying for the services and for that length of time.

I'd be worried about a phone service plan (AT&T) that requires me to pay to RECEIVE calls and SMS messages. I'm sorry but f00k that. It's not within my control, so I'd never pay for that. The US carriers need a real kick up the ass, but whilst they have the major politicians in their pockets, I guess it'll never change.
post #57 of 116
Guys, I have an iPod touch (for all intents and purposes is an iPhone without the phone). As it turns out, everywhere I go has freely available wi-fi. I have no need to check my email while I drive down the highway (which is what the iPhone data plan might be useful for).

Let's look at it this way. I currently pay ~$60/mo for 12Megabytes/sec internet connection at my home. AT&T is asking for $30/mo for 2Megabits/sec! Not including $5 for text messaging on top. It's a complete ripoff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrandersoniii View Post

And what precisely would be the purpose of having an iPhone without data.

None of the devices primary features would work unless on Wi-Fi. Which, if you have not noticed is not universally available. Visual voicemail would not work.

Go get a Touch. If you don't want Edge or 3G data - THE DEVICE IS NOT FOR YOU!!!!!!

You cannot get an iPhone without the data plan without paying the full price for the phone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

I'm quite sure you can get an iPhone from AT&T without a data plan, but what's the purpose?

Guess what? I am "always connected" with my iPod touch using wi-fi (FOR FREE). I would just like to carry one device instead of two. There is absolutely a value proposition to be made here and it doesn't involve $35/mo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

Stick with what you have, the whole point of the iPhone is the "always connected" world that it promotes.

If you don't want the data connection and don't really see the benefit of that side of things, you most definitely don't need an iPhone.
post #58 of 116
If the iphone is still perceived as too expensive, than these people clearly don't live in Canada. Its because of the iphone that prices of Blackberrys and data plans have been coming down here. So for that amazing feat, I say thank you Apple.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new report warns that halving the iPhone's price this summer still wasn't enough to truly grow sales -- and that recent metrics may show an actual shrink in sales during the early fall.

Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty points to a study of prospective iPhone buyers that shows about 46 percent of them believing the handset to be too expensive, even at its $199 entry point.

Few actually object to the phone itself; only 11 percent disliked either the design or the feature set, the researcher says. About 31 percent objected to the iPhone's continued exclusivity with AT&T, which prevents subscribers to Verizon or other carriers from switching without added costs.

Huberty also takes care to dismantle notions that the resistance necessarily has its roots in preconceptions of Apple, noting that only 15 percent of the same overall group thinks Macs are overpriced.

The percentage of those showing very strong interest in buying an iPhone has also dropped significantly over time. Where as many as 7 percent of would-be buyers were very interested in the phone in February 2007 -- four months before the original phone and many of its final details were released -- 5 percent now show that same level of interest today.

Regardless of Apple's own beliefs as to the truth of those objections, it may have to use price as leverage to spur sales, the analyst warns. According to Huberty, sales were half as strong during September and October versus the height of the iPhone's launch in July and September. The exact methodology used to collect this information isn't known, but the data is used to lower estimates for Apple's 2009 iPhone shipments from 19 million down to 14 million.

To spike sales, Huberty suggests that Apple should take a cue from recent rumors and halve the price to $100, which she believes could at least double iPhone sales numbers. Apple's prized profit margins likely wouldn't be an issue, she claims, as the company only needs to reduce the cost of manufacturing and selling an iPhone by 17 percent to achieve the intended effect.

While other reports have also been cautious on Apple's iPhone sales performance for the fall, recent analysis has also suggested that the numbers may be deceptive as the company passes through the holiday season. Kaufman Bros.' Shaw Wu has just noted that gift cards may be factors in any seemingly disappointing sales during the fall quarter, as Apple may record the immediate revenue from an iPhone 3G gift card but can't register the buyer as an iPhone customer until the recipient picks up and activates the handset.

As many as one million actual iPhone buyers may go "missing" as a result, Wu says.
post #59 of 116
They should have made a deal like RIM where the phone would be on sale with multiple carriers. I mean....DUH!

I have plenty of friends that would rather just stick with the black berry and verizon than switch to AT&T
post #60 of 116
I think lowering the price might not have very much impact. In my country, it's priced at 1 euro in combination with a pretty attractive T-Mobile phone + unlimited 3G subscription.

I think that many people are just not interested enough in iPhone's features, to even check their preconception that Apple products are way too expensive.

Apple's perceived priceyness is becoming more and more of a problem, I think.
post #61 of 116
My own study, based on 1 people interviewed (me), shows that if the Iphone was sold for 1$, Apple would sell hundred millions more.

Quote : "Apple's prized profit margins likely wouldn't be an issue, she claims, as the company only needs to reduce the cost of manufacturing and selling an iPhone by 17 percent to achieve the intended effect."

Don't you think that if it was so easy to reduce the cost of manufacturing & selling by 17%, Apple wouldn't have already done that ? Do you think this company is managed by monkeys ? Obviously this person has no idea of what manufacturing costs are.
post #62 of 116
$199 is certainly a fair price for the IPhone. The problem is the AT&T data charge. If AT&T made the data charge optional I would by an IPhone in an instant.
post #63 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawporta View Post

They should have made a deal like RIM where the phone would be on sale with multiple carriers. I mean....DUH!

I have plenty of friends that would rather just stick with the black berry and verizon than switch to AT&T

The strange thing being that RIM are now reversing that strategy. For example, the Blackberry Storm is only available on Verizon (Vodafone in the UK) and the Bold is only available on AT&T (Orange in the UK).

Utterly bizarre.
post #64 of 116
There are a number of people who would like many of the iPhone's features, but not the added expense (which is probably closer to $40/month after taxes) of AT&T's data plan. Some posters here live in a strict black/white world where such a scenario is utterly inconceivable! I won't go into the details of why someone might want to carry one device with them rather than two or more, even if they don't require a full-time net connection.

I myself am waiting until MacWorld to see if there is anything new coming out. But regardless, I plan to buy a new iPhone and then immediately cancel the service with AT&T, while paying the cancelation fee. So what can I then do with an unconnected iPhone? I'll take the SIM from my existing AT&T/Nokia dumb phone and use it in the iPhone. Voila - cheap monthly voice plan, and no data plan. (And to really rub people's nose in it, I have a grandfathered $29/month voice plan.) This is known to work, and I tried it with a friend's iPhone and made/received calls.

So instead of a $200 iPhone with $2400 worth of service (after taxes), I'll pay closer to $500 for the hardware and $950 for two-year's worth of voice-only service (while living off WiFi everywhere else, including what I get nationwide as part of my AT&T DSL service). Stick that in your pipe and smoke it.
post #65 of 116
we as Americans bitch too much about everything, especially about price. You know the world pays more for almost everything, right?

I'm living in Japan and my iPhone data plan starts at $16 and increases until a max of $60. That's on top of a plan that probably gives me like 200 minutes max for over $50. I can't remember, but you have no idea how much I miss American cell phone prices. Free nights and weekends. Unheard of here.

As for the phone price itself, $200 and look what you are holding. It's a bit more than a phone people.

Further on that...an iPhone without a data plan...do you realize the point of the iPhone??? Steve probably sat someplace and thought, dammit, these wireless technologies and hot spots suck and are so limited, wait, wait, cell phones have wide-spanning networks and we can finally have a world where you are always connected. That's the power of the data. I'm getting email and facebook, surfing the web, all sorts of things every day. (If only I had battery power to keep it up as much as I'd like to)

Also...we have text messages in japan but...every cell company gives out email addresses and everyone uses email over the cell networks. Added bonus is that you can send to any email address and everyone has one, so if you have unlimited data, you email any phone and you don't pay per message like you do with texts.
post #66 of 116
I read the MS report and the major data point she cites is that in late Nov 08, 5% of people polled (of 2,500 via the Internet) indicated they were "extremely interested" in purchasing the iPhone. This is down from 7% in Feb 07 (4 months before the first iPhone was even released).

I explain the result like this: most likely all those people who were extremely interested back in Feb 07 already bought one. Huberty is such a friggin simpleton. Also, she probably only polled North Americans although the phone is available in some 70 countries.

Who takes the time to answer Internet polls anyway?
post #67 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbansprawl View Post

Further on that...an iPhone without a data plan...do you realize the point of the iPhone???

Last I checked, it has the word 'phone' in its name. I use them to make calls.

Let's ask this hypothetical; what if Apple made an iPod Touch with a built-in phone - but no 3G chip - and charged an extra $50 (while also tossing in a cheapo camera)? Would there be a market for such a device? According to many responses here, I would have to say yes.

I don't for one second deny that the net-connected features of the iPhone are great, but for me they're not $2400-great. I've lived this long without them, and can continue to do so. I don't understand why others are so upset with such a scenario.
post #68 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The percentage of those showing very strong interest in buying an iPhone has also dropped significantly over time. Where as many as 7 percent of would-be buyers were very interested in the phone in February 2007 -- four months before the original phone and many of its final details were released -- 5 percent now show that same level of interest today.

*coff* That's called "sample error". I don't care what his sample size is, the accuracy is going to be less than 2%.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to Huberty, sales were half as strong during September and October versus the height of the iPhone's launch in July and September.

Is this supposed to be surprising?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

To spike sales, Huberty suggests that Apple should take a cue from recent rumors and halve the price to $100

People have been telling Apple to lower prices on just about every product they make. They're wrong every time.

Maury
post #69 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Is this supposed to be surprising?

I'm convinced that Huberty is the yen to Munster's yang.
post #70 of 116
It is inevitable that sales will drop because of the lack of carrier choice. Unless the iPhone is opened to others, like Verizon, iPhone sales will stagnate.
post #71 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerryn View Post

I do not have an issue with the purchase price of an iPhone being $200. My issue is with the AT&T contract rates.

I rarely use a mobile phone and so I do not want a contracted extortionate rate for phone minutes that I will never use. I want pay as you go. Were I want the iphone is for the connectivity to the internet but again the rates here are still too much. Still I might be more interested if I could get a pay as you use plan.

This is my problem with the iPhone as well. It's not the cost of admission, I'll gladly pay $299 for the 16G model, but I shudder at the monthly fees, where the lowest cost plan is $80 per month ($70 plus taxes and fees)!!! My current plan with Spirint gives me plenty of minutes and unlimited internet for $55... and its 3G...
post #72 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Few actually object to the phone itself; only 11 percent disliked either the design or the feature set, the researcher says. About 31 percent objected to the iPhone's continued exclusivity with AT&T, which prevents subscribers to Verizon or other carriers from switching without added costs.

Huberty also takes care to dismantle notions that the resistance necessarily has its roots in preconceptions of Apple, noting that only 15 percent of the same overall group thinks Macs are overpriced.

It is hard to believe these people. They would likely advocate that BMW should lower their prices to ensure lower income folks can buy them too. Perhaps They think that BMW should take lessons from Yugo.
post #73 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by tawilson View Post

I'd be worried about a phone service plan (AT&T) that requires me to pay to RECEIVE calls and SMS messages. I'm sorry but f00k that. It's not within my control, so I'd never pay for that. The US carriers need a real kick up the ass, but whilst they have the major politicians in their pockets, I guess it'll never change.

Have you noticed that nobody in the US or Canada (which has the same kind of payment system) ever complain about that?

It gives you a clue that all those who complain about this are Europeans who have absolutely no ikea on how the real world works.

There is not much talk on the web about crank calls and spam sms messages in the US --- it is not a problem at all. And it is about the total cost of ownership --- who really cares that Americans get charged for incoming if they can get the number of minutes that is more than 1/2 the price per minute than the other countries who don't charge for incoming.
post #74 of 116
No 'Storm' yet here in Canada...but I did meet someone with an HTC Touch yesterday in an elevator....

I enquired how he was finding 'one of those new touch phones'...?

His reply:

"I'm really waiting and hoping this thing breaks soon...I'm so not happy with it...I really should've got one of those iPod phones (sic)...!"

I think for me, despite any perceived cost - it's the only one to get - and others are realizing the same too.

How is the Storm btw - anyone buy one yet?

(I didn't pull my iPhone out my pocket either :-) )
post #75 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmjoe View Post

The overall 2 year cost went up by around $160.

People who believe this kind of "half" crap are part of the reason we're in this economic mess.


"Common Sense", where is Thomas Paine when you need him? It's certainly lacking with the outgoing and incoming governments.

http://www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply
post #76 of 116
It is an analysis done to justifying shorting apple and trying to drive the stock down to make money on the down side in an environment which people are not banking on an upside.

Second, maybe the drop from 7 to 5% of people considering an iphone is due to the fact the other 2% already got their phone. This analysis is trying to say Apple might have sold a million more units this fall if the price was less, gee that was rocket science at its best, no kidding you can always sell more if the price was less assuming it was not garbage you were selling.

Face it and most all you know this, every time one of these kinds of reports come out the stock drops and reality come back and it raises back up. Take this for what it is worth, it is attempt to move the stock down to cover short calls using so call statistic and analysis as justification, otherwise it would be considered illegal.
post #77 of 116
Huberty is an idiot with a pulpit.

What's the opposite of 46% think the price is too high? Why that would be 54% don't think the price is too high.

Until quarterly sales slow (for reasons other than seasonality) the price should not be lowered, when over half think its OK.

It is so hard to imagine that Huberty is a financial analyst of manufacturing stocks. A $100 haircut to the iPhone's price ALL COMES FROM GROSS MARGIN. Huberty would have you believe that market share is more important than profits, or conversely that profits are derived from market share. That's a fool's game (probably why she likes it so) and has been proven a failing business strategy countless times.

It doesn't say much for Morgan Stanley that they continue to employ her.
post #78 of 116
I agree completely with walshbj. It's not the price of the iPhone that is the problem but the $30 a month plan. Everyone I know wants an iPhone and have no problems paying $199 for it. However, it seems that $20 a month is the upper pain threshold for most people. Also, I can't believe we will have to pay ANOTHER $30 if we want to tether our iPhone to our laptops. AT&T is the problem, not Apple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by walshbj View Post

I don't consider it even remotely overpriced.

Those old Wizard pocket organizers - the ones with tip calcualtors, remember? They were at least $200 unless you had a deal from a guy like Bob Sacamano. No wifi. No phone. No music, photos, or video.

Seriously - the purchase price should be of nominal importance to the consumer. The question is can you come up with the extra $30 a month for a data plan. And to me, $30 a month is about the most I'd want to pay. With a crappy device that made surfing hard I wouldn't want to pay it. With the iPhones ease of use it's far more easy to pay. $30 strikes me as a laptop data plan price. $20 for the iPhone would cut down on the protest.

My wife has a BB 88xx and I was shocked at the web browser. It looked like Pong. I haven't looked at many smart phones to see what the browsers look like. But this Blackberry is miles behind the iPhone.

The real thing to complain about with iPhone pricing is SMS plans. That business is criminal.

EDIT : The Wizard went for over $600 in 1993
post #79 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by julesburt View Post

No 'Storm' yet here in Canada...but I did meet someone with an HTC Touch yesterday in an elevator....

I enquired how he was finding 'one of those new touch phones'...?

His reply:

"I'm really waiting and hoping this thing breaks soon...I'm so not happy with it...I really should've got one of those iPod phones (sic)...!"

I think for me, despite any perceived cost - it's the only one to get - and others are realizing the same too.

How is the Storm btw - anyone buy one yet?

(I didn't pull my iPhone out my pocket either :-) )


Re: BB Storm - Here's a quote from the telecom/IT administrator in my office:

"I saw this [a NY Times review] last week and turned down three users because of it. I did set one up yesterday for a person whose current Blackberry was worse than the review for the Storm so he said it has to be better.

By the time I was done setting it up, I had sore shoulders and needed a drink. It drove me nuts trying to press the various buttons; I kept hitting the surrounding options instead of the one I really wanted.

The browser was fast though, YouTube worked like a dream too. I think it is workable for someone who is willing to get used to it but it is definitely not user friendly."
post #80 of 116
This broad must be blowing somebody.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iPhone seen as still too expensive, losing steam in fall