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Blu-ray vs. DVD/VOD (2009) - Page 17

post #641 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Does anyone compare CBS's viewer numbers to HBO and claim the ratings prove no one will pay for HBO anymore because far more people watch the freely-broadcast CBS? No, they don't. Because that would be stupid.

Nobody has been making that argument. We're simply saying that free and paid services compete for viewership.

Quote:
Netflix streaming is a free supplement to those who rent physical media. I say again, it's FREE to those subscribers who are renting physical media from Netflix. When Netflix starts to offer a streaming-only package and beaks out those subscription numbers, then we'll talk (of course no one would do this because the content you're limited to sucks for the most part). In the meantime, 10% of the subscribers are opting to pay an additional $2-$3 more per month for Blu-Ray.

Yeah, and after about a week of watching content he'll no longer be able to find anything of interest on the "watch instantly" tab that he hasn't already seen.

Netflix doesn't offer a blu-ray only option either.

People already pay for electronic delivery of video to set top boxes. In fact, it is the most popular and profitable market for home video entertainment. Cable TV is what i'm talking about.

The transition to IP based streaming isn't that radical a departure as it might first appear. It simply involves a slightly different set top box with a different plug and a different service provider. The infrastructure is already there and the media providing services are spending huge some of money to capture that market.

What the masses are really waiting on are across-the-board licensing deals between those providers and the content owners. Certainly, people who really appreciate HD will stick to blu-ray and HD cable/satellite/ota. But in my opinion, the services, infrastructure, and hardware are already in place for the type of experience that most people desire. They're simply waiting on the licensing deals to make "watch anything anywhere anytime" a reality.
post #642 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Lol, wut? Please direct me to the data that shows PAID movie streaming and downloads is outpacing Blu-Ray adoption. HULU and YouTube doesn't count, because it's freakin' free.

I don't think any data will convince you, when you are claiming netflix streaming is a free supplement service and it does not count.

Oh well, I better google for "free Netflix movie streaming" and get in on this deal. Does this free service also come with free broadband internet?
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post #643 of 669
More interesting news on streaming:

MGM, Paramount, and Lionsgate have teamed up to launch a new streaming website:
Epix HD. It offers a max of 720p at 3Mbps via flash. As far as I can tell, it will be $9.99/month.

Arstechnica coverage:
Studios launch Epix high-def, on-demand movies site



You can sign up for a weekend trial via their website:
http://www.epixhd.com/invite
(I requested an invite but have yet to receive one.)


Here's the (non-linkable) FAQ from their website:
Quote:
Epix HD

*
Get Movies
Get Movies

Watch hundreds of big Hollywood movies and fan favorites, instantly. Get front-row seats to the hottest live music and comedy events.
All in HD.
*
Get Inside
Get More

EPIX takes you deeper into the movies you love. Tons of studio exclusives, behind the scenes access and downloadable extras.
*
Get Social
Go Anywhere

Watch Epix on any screen, anytime. On air. Online. On demand. The best movies are only two clicks away, and always in HD.

And we're just getting started.

Excellent. You're one step closer to the Epix experience.

An email has been sent to your address with more information on the Epix Invite Code.

Your love of movies will never change. But how you watch them is about to.

Click here to learn more about EPIX and Click Here for frequently asked questions.

Offer limited to US residents who are eighteen years of age or older only. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. Only one invite per person. Previous invite users are not eligible. Free invitation ends approximately 72 hours after receipt of your access code and registration. Except as otherwise provided, access codes under this free invitation shall expire on December 31, 2009. EPIX reserves the right to terminate this free invitation at any time or terminate your access to EPIXHD.com for any reason, including any violation of our Terms of Use EPIX is collecting your email address to enable EPIX to contact you with launch information, news and other updates related to EPIX and you agree that we may email you with this type of information. For more information on how EPIX treats your information, see our Privacy Policy

Technical Support:

Software Requirements:

To have the best experience on EPIXHD.com, you will need the following software installed on your computer:

Internet Explorer 7.0 or above, Firefox 3 or above, or Safari 3.0 (Mac / PC), and Google Chrome.
JavaScript and Cookies must also be enabled
Adobe Flash Player 10 or above
Microsoft Windows XP SP2, Microsoft Windows Vista or Macintosh OS X

In addition to the software requirements, you will need an internet connection that is capable of providing you with high bandwidth. A minimum of 500Kbps download is required to seamlessly view the lowest rate possible. Our videos stream at a variable rate between 500Kbps up to 3000Kbps, and we will dynamically adjust our stream based on your bandwidth capability. You will also have the ability to choose either the highest quality stream (3000Kbps) or set the player to variable/seamless mode, which will adjust the bit rate accordingly. We recommend a minimum downstream bandwidth of 1,000Kbps for the smoothest playback experience.

Account:
You can enjoy most of EPIXHDs by simply visiting the website, and even more when you sign up for a free account.

When you sign up for a free registration you will receive:
Full access to the website and all of its pages
Ability to watch all the extras videos
Watch a movie in the private screening room (with invite from a paid subscriber)

Create a profile which will let you share your interests with other users and a feed to follow your recent activity on the site


However, a Paid subscription will offer you the full experience and the following advantages:
All the access that free subscribers get
The ability to watch all the movies available from our library

Login:
In order to register or login you must click on the Me Tab from wherever you are on the website.

To create a new account:
Click on the Me Tab to access the registration form
Fill out the form with a username, email, and unique password
An email will be sent to the account you provided and you must click the link to confirm registration.
When you click the link provided in the email you will be returned to the registration area and requested to authenticate your Verizon user information or input an invitation code. (if you do not have either of these items you will not be allowed to view movies.)
When you have confirmed registration and/or have authenticated your information you are all set to go!

Audio:
A majority of audio issues that users experience can be resolved on their end very easily. The following are some suggestions if you are experiencing less than satisfactory audio:

Make sure the volume level on the video player is properly set and that you have no muted the movie.
Make sure that your computer speakers are turned on and that the volume is set to the appropriate level. Also make sure that your computer volume is not muted. To check this do the following: On Windows: double-click the volume Icon in the System Tray making sure none of your settings are muted. On Macintosh: the volume controls are located in the top right corner of the menu bar.
Make sure that you are able to listen to audio files locally on your computer.
Restart your browser and try to watch another video.

If these steps do not resolve your issue, you may need to reinstall your Flash drivers.

To do so:
Uninstall Flash following these steps.
Restart your computer.
Reinstall the latest version of Flash following these steps.

Geo-Filtering:
EPIXHD is currently only available in the United States, At present we do not have international streaming rights for our movies.

Streaming:
The movies you watch on EPIXHD are streamed to your computer and use a process known as buffering in order to ensure the smoothest playback possible. If your Internet connection does not meet the minimum requirements you will experience stuttering of the movie as your buffer begins to run out. To remedy this it is recommended you pause the movie and let the buffer reach its maximum to ensure smooth playback. The buffer size is limited due to legal reasons and will only download a short portion of the movie.

Stuttering;
When a video begins to stutter, discovering the root cause of the issue is difficult to diagnose. However, there are some methods to determine if the stutter is being caused by a common cause. If you are experiencing a stutter one of the following may be the cause:

If you are experience both an audio and video stutter during playback, the most likely cause is an issue with your internet connection.
If your audio playback is fine but video playback is not working properly, it is likely that you are experiencing hardware or software issues on your computer.
You are viewing the movie over a wireless connection which may not provide the same bandwidth as a wired connection.
You are using multiple bandwidth intensive programs or downloading something while watching a movie at the same time.
You are sharing an internet connection with other people on a network and they are using bandwidth intensive applications.
Your computer hardware is incapable of handling video playback in full screen mode and you are only able to smoothly watch a video in regular mode.

Besides these two common reasons for playback issues, there may be a deeper issue that you are experiencing on your computer, on your network, or from your internet service provider. If this is the case we recommend seeking out a professional to diagnose and resolve the problem.

Video Settings:
The EPIXHD video player is capable of streaming multiple levels of quality to your browser. As the user you are able to decide whether you want to watch a movie in variable quality or in the highest quality. The video quality that is available to you are the following: 500Kbps, 900Kbps, 1200Kbps, 1700Kbps, 2200Kbps, 3000Kbps. When in variable/seamless mode, the streaming values will range through all the values depending on connection speed. If a user chooses to watch the movie only in the highest quality possible, they are able to choose the Maximum/Locked mode in the stream info menu.
post #644 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Nobody has been making that argument. We're simply saying that free and paid services compete for viewership.

Well sure. But there are generally two sides to the discussion regarding what home movie viewing will look like in 10 years; those who believe physical discs (Blu-Ray, DVD) will still be the dominant method in which people purchase movies, and those who believe hardly anyone will still buy movies on disc. There's a huge flaw in using the adoption numbers of free supplemental streaming services as evidence that physical media's days are numbered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Netflix doesn't offer a blu-ray only option either.

If a person is opting to pay $2-$5 (depending on their plan) more per month for Blu-Ray access, chances are high they're making good use of it on a regular basis. 42% of Netflix subscribers TRIED streaming last quarter at least once — a feature they get for free when they rent physical media. 10% of their users opted to pay more for Blu-Ray. Suggesting that physical media is on it's way out based on that data is misleading.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

What the masses are really waiting on are across-the-board licensing deals between those providers and the content owners. Certainly, people who really appreciate HD will stick to blu-ray and HD cable/satellite/ota. But in my opinion, the services, infrastructure, and hardware are already in place for the type of experience that most people desire. They're simply waiting on the licensing deals to make "watch anything anywhere anytime" a reality.

It's the licensing deals that I think are going to have us waiting a long, long, long time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bitemymac View Post

I don't think any data will convince you, when you are claiming netflix streaming is a free supplement service and it does not count.

Am I wrong? You can't pay for Netflix streaming as a standalone service — it's a free supplement to Netflix' physical media service (the thing streaming is supposedly going to kill real soon). For that reason, there's no way to know if people would be willing to pay more (or limit themselves exclusively) for the ability to stream some content instantly. On the other hand, we know 10% of Netflix subscribers have opted to pay more for Blu-Ray. If they did offer a streaming-only package, then we'd get a flavor for how many people can really do without physical media, limiting their viewership to only those films the studios are willing to allow to be streamed. Few people would opt for such a service because the selection (especially HD) sucks, hard. My point being, with the studios current licensing structure (which I don't imagine will ever go away), streaming can't and won't be the only service a user comes to rely on.

If McDonalds started giving away free french fries with every Big Mac, no one would claim the spike in french fry consumption means mashed potatoes will soon be a thing of the past.
post #645 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Well sure. But there are generally two sides to the discussion regarding what home movie viewing will look like in 10 years; those who believe physical discs (Blu-Ray, DVD) will still be the dominant method in which people purchase movies, and those who believe hardly anyone will still buy movies on disc.

That doesn't seem like an accurate characterization of the debate. There are a huge number of people who think that the video market will be comprised of many options; that no single video delivery model will reach the monolithic status that VHS and DVD achieved. This leaves plenty of room for physical media to comprise a non-insignificant percentage of the market, even if streaming dominates.

Quote:
There's a huge flaw in using the adoption numbers of free supplemental streaming services as evidence that physical media's days are numbered.

You keep saying that netflix streaming is "free" and "supplemental". yet in order to stream from netflix, you have to pay netflix. It is not "free".

As for "supplemental". It seems that you're unwilling to even consider that some subscribers see streaming as a key part of the netflix service. It is part of what they paid for, part of why they chose netflix, despite it always being bundled with the physical disk plans. I love watching blu-rays from netflix. But I probably would have opted for FiOS tv instead if netflix didn't provide streaming. Netflix disks and various forms of streaming are why I no longer pay for cable. Granted, this isn't the typical sentiment. But it is becoming increasingly so.

All console gamers will have the option of netflix streaming soon. 360 already does, PS3 will next month, and rumor has it that a Wii will follow within a month or two. It is crazy to think that the tens of millions of console owners won't make use of the convenience of streaming, especially if they're already netflix subscribers.

But most importantly, netflix is only one of the competing options. (See my previous post about Epix HD) Hundreds of millions if not billions are being spent by companies in order to get into the streaming market. These companies aren't just guessing and throwing their money about. They've got highly paid analysts studying consumer behavior and market stats.

The reasoned argument is about _when_ electronically delivered video will dominate, not whether it is desirable. (It already does if you include cable/satellite/fios) People clearly would enjoy being able to watch anything anywhere anytime. Tired of hearing me harp on that phrase yet? I don't think it can be repeated too many times. It is the future, a mind boggling future, and one that will occur in our lifetimes. The argument is simply about when.
post #646 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Does anyone compare CBS's viewer numbers to HBO and claim the ratings prove no one will pay for HBO anymore because far more people watch the freely-broadcast CBS? No, they don't. Because that would be stupid.


Netflix streaming is a free supplement to those who rent physical media. I say again, it's FREE to those subscribers who are renting physical media from Netflix. When Netflix starts to offer a streaming-only package and beaks out those subscription numbers, then we'll talk (of course no one would do this because the content you're limited to sucks for the most part). In the meantime, 10% of the subscribers are opting to pay an additional $2-$3 more per month for Blu-Ray.



Yeah, and after about a week of watching content he'll no longer be able to find anything of interest on the "watch instantly" tab that he hasn't already seen.

you can also rent amazon movies/tv showson the netflix roku box
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post #647 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

The reasoned argument is about _when_ electronically delivered video will dominate, not whether it is desirable. (It already does if you include cable/satellite/fios) People clearly would enjoy being able to watch anything anywhere anytime. Tired of hearing me harp on that phrase yet? I don't think it can be repeated too many times. It is the future, a mind boggling future, and one that will occur in our lifetimes. The argument is simply about when.

in nyc i already stream almost every thing every where in decent quality too. i agree it is mind boggling to think of how cheap the media will become once the brick and mortar expense is factored out. cheap flash drives will be the nail that drives this whole thing mainstream .
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post #648 of 669
If I want to watch movies on DVD I wil watch them on my TV. Movie playback's the last thing I want from blu-ray on a computer, so I don't see how Netflix netgates the need for a blu-ray capable machine any more than Blockbuster video negated the need for a DVD drive.
post #649 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

The reasoned argument is about _when_ electronically delivered video will dominate, not whether it is desirable. (It already does if you include cable/satellite/fios) People clearly would enjoy being able to watch anything anywhere anytime. Tired of hearing me harp on that phrase yet? I don't think it can be repeated too many times. It is the future, a mind boggling future, and one that will occur in our lifetimes. The argument is simply about when.

Well for example..

My cable provider is Cablevision a small provider by all normal gauges but they own a fairly sizable chunk of the greater NY area, NYC, Long Island, etc / Nothern NJ and Southern CT. (perhaps other regions I'm leaving out).

They had a very interesting take on PVRs in the home...

They did NOT want to offer people SA8300HDs and the like so people could record 2 channels at the same time and have it stored on a local HD that was prone to failure rendering all of the shows completely unretrievable. Then they had more business reasons to think about... those PVR boxes cost a good chunk of change and why give that money to SA when they could roll their own mega-PVR and at the same time provide customers will the same low cost boxes they always have.

Here was their vision:

1 - Have a headend facility that would record everything!

Okay, not everything but it would by default record all the big channels programming most everything anyway.

- CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX, WB, UPN (or whatever those last 2 are called these days).

And then as customers activated their channel guide and chose to record a future event a command would be sent to the headend where it would check if someone else had already requested it... if it did the system will indicate that customer X also wants to record this show (but the show itself would only be recorded 1 time total) or if nobody else on the entire system requested that specific program to be recorded then it would tell the system to record 'The Semi-Final - Full Contact Intramural Lawn Darts Competition' on ESPN12 from midnight to 2 AM just for a single (somewhat pathetic) customer X.

In short, all recording would be maintained in the server rooms of Cablevision and the customers would simply have low cost cable boxes.

Well the networks sued because... well because thats what they do.. and Cablevision fought and finally after expending X million dollars in legal costs they won... The legal fees will of course be paid by rate increases (did you expect anything different?) and sometime in early 2010 cablevision will be converting over to this new system. Some things are still unknown at this point...

- Can we record more that 2 shows at a time now? I'd think so...

- Can we access recorded events even tho WE didn't officially request them to be recorded? **

** This will certainly be an interesting thing to learn... Imagine if you'd be able to browse the full collection of recorded programs (provided you subscribe to the channels they were recorded from) and play back anything you found interesting... I'm gonna guess they will not allow this to happen and same goes for recording unlimited events at the same time... I could see them expanding the total number of simulations recording requests from 2 to 4 or perhaps 6 but I'm guessing they will cap it at something. Also what happens to the length of time you get to keep the recording? With a box of my own I could keep a recording indefinitely will the same be true with this new system? Will tell sell PVR in 'storage sizes' - the space to store 50 HD programs will cost you X per month the cost to store 100 HD programs would cost you Y? I guess I'll know more when they release the news sometime next year...

It'll be interesting to see how it all shakes out... Provided the networks don't re-file another lawsuit.
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post #650 of 669
Um, okay. What discs are we going to store this stuff on?

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post #651 of 669
Quote:

These guys are clowns.
Quote:
As originally proposed, UHD comes in two levels of resolution: 7680×4320 pixels (i.e., 8K resolution), and 3840×2160 (i.e., 4K resolution). The rising popularity of high resolution digital cinema will expose consumers to high resolution content. Then, early UHDTVs will be made available to provide a digital cinema high resolution viewing experience in the home. Ultimately, broadcasters will start offering UHD content to an addressable market of UHDTVs, between 2017 and 2022.

That kind of resolution on a screen that'll actually fit in your home is about as worthwhile as 1080p on a 20" screen from 8 feet away completely imperceptible. Unless 100" screens become the common thing in households (no one has room for such a thing), there's not going to be a need for resolutions higher than 1920x1080 in a home format.
post #652 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

That doesn't seem like an accurate characterization of the debate. There are a huge number of people who think that the video market will be comprised of many options; that no single video delivery model will reach the monolithic status that VHS and DVD achieved. This leaves plenty of room for physical media to comprise a non-insignificant percentage of the market, even if streaming dominates.

Well then you and I are in agreement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

You keep saying that netflix streaming is "free" and "supplemental". yet in order to stream from netflix, you have to pay netflix. It is not "free".

How many Netflix subscribers do you think are paying for Netflix but don't put any DVDs in their queue? I'll bet none. Ergo, they're paying for physical media rental and getting streaming thrown in as a supplement. Netflix didn't start as a streaming service and add mail-away DVDs at no additional cost — it was the other way around. Additionally, the streaming library is far too limited to be anyone's only source of movies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

All console gamers will have the option of netflix streaming soon. 360 already does, PS3 will next month, and rumor has it that a Wii will follow within a month or two. It is crazy to think that the tens of millions of console owners won't make use of the convenience of streaming, especially if they're already netflix subscribers.

I have no doubt that they will. No argument there. But is the Netflix streaming selection going to allow anyone to say to hell with physical media? Not by a long shot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

But most importantly, netflix is only one of the competing options. (See my previous post about Epix HD) Hundreds of millions if not billions are being spent by companies in order to get into the streaming market. These companies aren't just guessing and throwing their money about. They've got highly paid analysts studying consumer behavior and market stats.

The reasoned argument is about _when_ electronically delivered video will dominate, not whether it is desirable. (It already does if you include cable/satellite/fios) People clearly would enjoy being able to watch anything anywhere anytime. Tired of hearing me harp on that phrase yet? I don't think it can be repeated too many times. It is the future, a mind boggling future, and one that will occur in our lifetimes. The argument is simply about when.

I'm not saying people wouldn't favor streaming if it delivered whatever they want, where they want it and when. And if that's the way it worked I'd be on the, "don't bother with Blu-Ray, electronic HD distribution is right around the corner!" bandwagon right alongside the other guys still clinging to their 10 year old DVD players. If I could come home on Tuesday and instantly stream this weeks new home video releases in HDX-quality or greater, along with any other movie I could think of off the top of my head, on any of my devices (xBox, HDTV, computer, iPhone) and do it all for a flat monthly rate — well that would be the greatest thing ever. But that's not how the studios let us do it today, and that's not how they're going to let us do it in ten years, let alone five. New streaming releases will still lag behind physical media releases, only select films will be made available and will become unavailable a few months later, and you won't be able to do it for a flat monthly rate. To change the system to work in the consumer's advantage would require the studios give up billions of dollars in annual revenue.

Regarding buying streaming content to "own", for that to really take off it would require all of the studios and all of the digital download venders to agree on a system in which you can purchase a movie on device X in it's proprietary DRM'd format, and also gain the ability to stream it on device Y in it's proprietary DRM'd format. For example, buy an HD movie on your xBox 360 and gain a license to stream it on your iPhone. Buy a movie from the Amazon store on your Samsung HDTV, and gain the ability to watch it on your Mac in iTunes. You don't buy a file (that would require it be locked to a single device or every device manufacturer use the same format and DRM scheme, which ain't gonna happen), but rather a license that's honored by all major device makers and download vendors.
post #653 of 669
Quote:

By the time that lot roles out we'll have discs in the TB's. Pioneer/Hitachi are already doing 500gb discs for anyone willing to swap an arm and a leg.
post #654 of 669
PS3 netflix streaming discs have been sent out! Mine will arrive tomorrow but I'm out of town so a review will have to wait until Saturday.

Another advantage of streaming? It's kept me somewhat less bored at night on this week long business trip. It doesn't take too long for drinking on the company dime to wear off. a typical scenario... work all day, eat, work out, it's 8 or 9pm, now what? HBO on hotel cable is showing a movie I've already seen. Nice alternative? Plug laptop into hotel room tv and stream a movie.

As for the EpixHD service? I tried it out and it was mediocre at best. It had a small selection but I did find a couple good movies to watch. The main problem was the browsing interface. Imagine the least usable solution possible. It was worse, way worse.
post #655 of 669
I look forward to burning my Final Cut HD projects using Netflix.
post #656 of 669
Netflix PS3 Streaming Disc Review:

Test Environment:
InFocus X10 1080-24p front projector on a a 52" DaLite screen.
Denon 3808 receiver and Crown Macrotech amp for the mains.
7.1 Speaker setup: Polk RTi 150 mains, CS400i center, FX500 dipole surrounds, SVS Ultra13 subwoofer
PS3 on wired gigabit switch with 20Mbps FiOS


The PS3 takes about 23 seconds to enter the netflix streaming program after selecting it from the play station menu. After selecting a video, it takes anywhere from 7 to 20 seconds for playback to begin.

Standard def streams were between 1 and 2 Mbps while HD streams were anywhere from 2 to 5 Mbps. Both were limited to 2 channel 48khz 128kbps (AC3?) audio. There was never any stuttering or halting of playback. The HD rips are fantastic! However some of the SD rips are pretty pathetic, 4:3 crops with poorer detail than would be expected, even at the posted bit rate. In fact, the HD quality was so good that most consumers will probably not care about the difference between it and blu-ray in all its 30Mbps glory. (Note I said "most" )

The PS3 switched to different resolutions over HDMI for various netflix streams. These included 720x480 and 1280x720 (and other resolutions?). Although for some reason, these sometimes registered on my projector as with an extra pixel horizontally or vertically. I've never seen that problem before. Could be the denon AVR, the PS3 or the Infocus projector.

Fast forwarding and rewinding is done via a thumbnail time line. After a new thumbnail is selected, playback typically resumes in around 5 seconds.

Overall, I'm quite pleased with the user experience of netflix-PS3 streaming. Much improvement is certainly possible. Yet it is good enough that I'll use it on a regular basis. Finally, a massive library of streaming is available in my home theater!

My hopes for the future are:
* More and improved options for browsing the video library.
* A bigger library
* Provide everything in HD (Or what netflix currently calls HD )
* 5.1 audio at a higher bit rate.

None of those are deal breakers for me though. Netflix-PS3 streaming has found a home in my theater, right along side blu-ray and broadcast HD.
post #657 of 669
PS3 is not known for their upscaling ability and the SD streaming PQ quality may be improved on a unit with designated video processors like the streaming capable BD players. I would not imagine the improvement would be like the HD content quality, but it can be better.

On the audio side, I think DD+ at 1.5Mbps will deliver near lossless quality 5.1 audio and I would think this is something feasible in the very near future to include DD+ audio along with HD streaming contents. The VuDu HDX already offers DD+ audio with their HD streaming contents. My comcast cable can burst at 15Mbps with sustainable streaming spreed around 8 to 10 Mbps even at peak hour. This is not the fastest speed available, and internet speed getting even faster in the future, can definitely deliver even higher level of data transfer rate to deliver HD video and audio once netflix and others start offering higher qualify contents. This is huge and the adoption of the streaming services are coming much faster to consumers seeking the option. I am amazed to see how many newer HDTV models are offering streaming options out of the box as well as how cheap you can have it, for about $100 for streaming media player unit, for those with older model TV's or even Blu-ray/DVD players. Ideally though, I would much prefer getting a decent streaming capable Blu-ray player with decent video processor as a media transport. The DD+ audio would require a decoder currently only available via Blu-Ray/AVR units. BTW, can PS3 decode DD+?
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post #658 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitemymac View Post

BTW, can PS3 decode DD+?

Considering it can both decode and bitstream DTS-HD MA and TrueHD, I would hope so.
post #659 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Netflix PS3 Streaming Disc Review:

Test Environment:
InFocus X10 1080-24p front projector on a a 52" DaLite screen.

Dude, your screen is too small.
post #660 of 669
I like having options, streaming or a disc is fine with me.
post #661 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

That's precisely what would need to happen. Some kind of universal database would need to keep track of what movies you have purchased regardless of what digital distributor you purchased them from and all other digital distributors would have to honor the database. This way, you could pay $20 to buy a movie on VUDU in their proprietary HDX DRM format, but you'd then be free to download the same movie on your iPhone in Apple's proprietary DRM and format/size, as well as on your Sony PSP, PS3, etc.

The issue is getting everyone to cooperate on a system like this, from all of the movie studios to all of the digital content providers. It doesn't do any good if only Disney does it.

Looks like Disney is bringing my concept to life, and they're calling it Keychest. Looks like there's hope for a disc-free world after all.
post #662 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Looks like Disney is bringing my concept to life, and they're calling it Keychest. Looks like there's hope for a disc-free world after all.

Very interesting. The same Disney that has such close ties to a certain Mr. Jobs, and who has always been an early participant in whatever online video schemes Apple comes up with.

There was talk of how Apple's Lala acquisition might enable iTunes streaming, using the "scan your hard drive and make server copies of your purchased music available in the cloud" trick, but this sounds like that idea on steroids.
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post #663 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Very interesting. The same Disney that has such close ties to a certain Mr. Jobs, and who has always been an early participant in whatever online video schemes Apple comes up with.

There was talk of how Apple's Lala acquisition might enable iTunes streaming, using the "scan your hard drive and make server copies of your purchased music available in the cloud" trick, but this sounds like that idea on steroids.

Keychest is better in that it allows all of your devices to maintain whatever format and DRM they use now; the only thing kept in the "cloud" is a yes or no as to whether or not you paid for the thing. This is a far more realistic approach, because there will never be a world where every desirable electronic device uses the same video format and DRM. With Keychest, they don't have to; they just have to agree to honor your purchase of a movie on someone else's digital store, and vice-versa.
post #664 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Keychest is better in that it allows all of your devices to maintain whatever format and DRM they use now; the only thing kept in the "cloud" is a yes or no as to whether or not you paid for the thing. This is a far more realistic approach, because there will never be a world where every desirable electronic device uses the same video format and DRM. With Keychest, they don't have to; they just have to agree to honor your purchase of a movie on someone else's digital store, and vice-versa.

Right, but it also means that cloud based streaming services could make use of the same key query, and that those keys could be granted retroactively on stuff you already own. So in the case of the LaLa scheme, instead of having to scan your drive for content, you could just upload your keys to the iTunes servers, bingo, streaming iTunes with no copyright worries.

Not just Apple, of course, it would be great for the entire content industry. You could have Keychest, internet enabled flat screens that make the simple key query and allow you to watch your content there.

Man, the more I think about it, the more this sounds like the holy grail of multiple screen content consumption. And because it gives the rights holders what they need it does an end run around proprietary hardware schemes.

Seeing as how it makes so much sense, I have to assume the big studios will be dead set against it.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #665 of 669
I'm terribly disappointed that, for the first time in at least five years, nobody bothered to start an annual thread.

I would suggest Blu-Ray vs. iTunes [2010], just for consistency's sake.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #666 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

I'm terribly disappointed that, for the first time in at least five years, nobody bothered to start an annual thread.

I would suggest Blu-Ray vs. iTunes [2010], just for consistency's sake.

Agreed. It's a glorious tradition that gets ever more awe inspiring the longer it goes on.

Hmmmm...... (rushes off).
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #667 of 669
I thought this was about DVD vs BluRay, not a thread about streaming. Sure, I'd love to download true HD video with at least 5.1 Dolby Digital sound, but try doing that on 384 Kb/s so-called broadband. Amazon.co.uk can deliver a disc to me faster than I can download a movie. In fact, I can't download any large files as the ISP throttles back the service when I try it. Most of the world isn't wired with real broadband internet service. I live in a city of 600,000+ and the ISPs here are awful.

My MacBook Pro has the very same "SuperDrive" DVD RW drive that came in my 2004 PowerBook G4. The screen on my MacBook Pro is 1920 x 1200 and when a DVD movie is scaled up to that resolution it looks awful! Apple has missed the boat here. People can and do watch movies on their computers. Truly mobile people especially do and even if they have access to broadband, content available in the USA is often blocked when out of the country. I've purchased an external BluRay drive and it works, but it's a cumbersome arrangement having to carry the device with me, plug it in, and then boot into Windows to watch a BluRay movie. It looks ridiculous next to a modern notebook PC with built in BluRay. Apple makes more than enough money to pay the BluRay licensing fees and deliver a decent BluRay software player bundled into a laptop computer with a built in BluRay drive.

It's 2010 fer chrissake!
post #668 of 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrJedi View Post

I thought this was about DVD vs BluRay, not a thread about streaming.

Note the term "VOD" in this thread's title.
post #669 of 669
This thread is no longer current. Please see the "Blu-ray vs. every other consumer technology 2010" thread.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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