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iTunes Store Goes DRM Free - Page 2

post #41 of 67
Ok, I have a couple of questions...

We have 4 music labels(4ML) that originally benefited from iTunes sales. With the grab for more money, the 4ML withheld catalogs from iTunes(while requiring them to DRM the tracks) and pursued other sales venues with the withheld catalogs. That sounds unethical, if not slightly monopolistic. After all, they began this all via iTunes so why punish them for being successful?

So, the 4ML make a deal with Amazon and WalMart to not only sell music tracks not available to iTunes at a lower rate(0.89 for some, .99 for the rest) AND ok them being in MP3 format? Will their prices go up to the same $1.29 that iTunes is required to charge?

Hopefully, the 'Covert to MP3' option will still be enabled for those Plus tracks. It would be nice if iTunes would sell MP3 tracks, but I don't mind having a convert option as long as I don't have to burn to a CD just to import it back. So there's a light at the end of that tunnel.

10 millions tracks available in one place? Quite impressive!
Ability to convert to MP3? Even MORE impressive!
As for the 4ML, I hear a sucking wind sound....

Maybe Apple should consider its own in-house music label.
post #42 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdhayes117 View Post

That's a 30% premium for the privilege of having legally purchased my music rather than pirating it like so many others have.

So don't upgrade. Your old music works just fine, doesn't it?

Besides, you're now also getting higher quality files from the other three labels, so it's not like you're not getting anything for your money.

Think DVD to BluRay...
post #43 of 67
After doing an "Upgrade My Library" make sure to have iTunes search for duplicates. After I did my upgrade, iTunes didn't quite delete all the duplicate items for the new ones downloaded. I had to manually delete a few of them.
post #44 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKGuy323 View Post

Maybe Apple should consider its own in-house music label.

That's been a point of discussion here before, but now that I've given it more thought I don't think it would be a smart move on their part. Musicians are a pain to deal with directly, and they need their management companies to handle negotiations. Apple would eventually get bogged down dealing with personalities rather than selling product.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #45 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by walshbj View Post

What happens if I upgrade to Plus now and then more songs are made available as Plus between now and the end of the quarter? How long will this offer be available?

It's always been available where you can chose which qualifying tracks to upgrade, when you want to upgrade them. I don't think this was changed. I never had to upgrade them all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Good luck with that. You can only upgrade the entire library, not individual songs.

This hasn't been true in my experience. You CAN upgrade the whole library, but you can also chose to upgrade individual albums or songs too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdhayes117 View Post

I'm somewhat chapped that we have to pay extra for something that those who purchase now get for no additional cost. Over the last several years, I have legally purchased several hundred $s worth of music from iTunes. Now, to make my music DRM-free, I have to pay another $100+ for tracks that, if I bought them today, would cost me nothing additional. I get no new music, just slightly higher quality and no (always undesired...) copy protection. Although I have had the use of those tracks during that time, Apple has had the use of my funds so I think we should be considered even... If anything, I think those who previously purchased should be rewarded for supporting legal music acquisition. I'd be satisfied if that reward was the ability to remove my copy protection at no additional cost.

Anyone else feel the same way?

I understand, but it's always been worse. Say an album gets remastered. You have to buy the whole album all over again at the same price that a newcomer would. I don't remember anyone getting trade-ups. It's been the same with software too, you bought last year's version, you still had to pay a price to upgrade to the new version, even though say a person that walks into the Apple store today gets Leopard for the same price you paid for Tiger two years ago. The same applies to Windows software too.

Besides, you got what you paid for, there is no social contract that I'm aware of that requires that later upgrades and remasters be free.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

I think Apple were always right about the variable pricing and the music companies were always wrong. Having a single price always gave me the confidence to make casual purchases knowing I was paying a fixed price. Now, every time I see some music at the higher, premium price, I will feel a little cheated and this will create a little speed-bump before I hit the BUY button. I think the music industry are their own worst enemies and don't know their industry. That's why they gave it away to pirates in the first place and Steve Jobs saved their lazy asses by showing you can sell electronically and legally and people will still pay.

But it is a needlessly rigid system, it treats a triple platinum album the same as a double rust one, and prices a new track the same as an old one. The desire to keep everything the exact same price despite difference in demand and desirability seems pretty quaint to me.

Please tell me what other circumstances outside of what iTunes sells where several different releases were priced exactly the same. New release DVDs are not always priced the same as each other, and they dropped in price in time, but rarely at the same speed as each other. Nobody that's sane goes to a book store complaining that book XY is not priced the same as YZ even if they are about the same size. Even dollar stores aren't nearly so rigid as the pricing of music tracks.
post #46 of 67
When upgrading tracks to DRM-free, is there a way to transfer the meta-data to the new tracks?

I'd like to upgrade my library, but I don't want to lose my song Ratings, Genres, Play Counts, etc. Most of my playlists are based off this stuff.
post #47 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

This hasn't been true in my experience. You CAN upgrade the whole library, but you can also chose to upgrade individual albums or songs too.

How do you do that? It seems like it's all or nothing at this point.

I have nothing against paying to upgrade tracks. The 30¢ charge seems a little excessive, but OK. It's the notion that you have to pay for everything at once that's aggravating people. It may cost you 50 bucks this week. Next week it may be 100 bucks.

There should be some way of selectively upgrading what you've bought.
post #48 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by endurefun View Post

When upgrading tracks to DRM-free, is there a way to transfer the meta-data to the new tracks?

I'd like to upgrade my library, but I don't want to lose my song Ratings, Genres, Play Counts, etc. Most of my playlists are based off this stuff.

I don't see an easy way to do this. I think iTunes gives you a new file without taking on the changes that happened to the old one. You can manually enter most of that except the play counts. Maybe there's an applescript hack somewhere that lets you migrate metadata from one song to another.
post #49 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

This hasn't been true in my experience. You CAN upgrade the whole library, but you can also chose to upgrade individual albums or songs too.

How? I really want to know. Beside delete the tracks that I don't want upgraded from my library temporarily, obviously.

No matter how Apple screw us over and over again. (In this case, more like the Music Industry's doing the screwing part) iTunes still wins. I just bought the Killers' new album in iTunes plus to complete the single "spaceman" Ahhhhhh I'm really a sucker
post #50 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by BGPu View Post

How do you do that? It seems like it's all or nothing at this point.

I have nothing against paying to upgrade tracks. The 30¢ charge seems a little excessive, but OK. It's the notion that you have to pay for everything at once that's aggravating people. It may cost you 50 bucks this week. Next week it may be 100 bucks.

There should be some way of selectively upgrading what you've bought.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenKids View Post

How? I really want to know. Beside delete the tracks that I don't want upgraded from my library temporarily, obviously.

No matter how Apple screw us over and over again. iTunes still wins. I just bought the Killers' new album in iTunes plus to complete the single "spaceman" Ahhhhhh I'm really a sucker

I could have sworn that I had upgraded only specific tracks in the past, but you two are right, right now, it's an all or nothing deal.

I don't know if deleting certain tracks in your library would do it, because there are tracks listed that my sister bought using my account that never ended up in my library.
post #51 of 67
Remember if you upgrade you're going from 128kbps to 256kbps, and that as a result the file size will be effectively TWICE as large.

Nano owners with limited space be warned.
post #52 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I could have sworn that I had upgraded only specific tracks in the past, but you two are right, right now, it's an all or nothing deal.

I don't know if deleting certain tracks in your library would do it, because there are tracks listed that my sister bought using my account that never ended up in my library.

Actually, I just found this line in Apple's official FAQ section

You cannot choose which songs, music videos or albums to upgrade individually.

Oh, well
post #53 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahmlco View Post

Remember if you upgrade you're going from 128kbps to 256kbps, and that as a result the file size will be effectively TWICE as large.

Nano owners with limited space be warned.

On that note, it sure makes 2GB shuffle much less hideous going through playlist randomly
post #54 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by endurefun View Post

When upgrading tracks to DRM-free, is there a way to transfer the meta-data to the new tracks?

I'd like to upgrade my library, but I don't want to lose my song Ratings, Genres, Play Counts, etc. Most of my playlists are based off this stuff.

All of your metadata stays intact when you upgrade. It always has for me when I used it in the past. I see no reason for it not to work now, either.
post #55 of 67
This upgrade scheme appears broken to me. I have songs showing up in the list that I imported myself and never purchased. Also there are songs listed separately that are also part of a greatest hits album it wants to upgrade, so in effect it wants to upgrade me twice for the single song.

This all or nothing upgrade is a load of crap.
post #56 of 67
I may be unusual but I don't mind Apple's DRM and I'm satisfied with the quality of the 128Kbps songs I've bought (lots of them). I'm concerned at some point I'll no longer be able to transfer these songs to a new computer after Apple decides to shut down their DRM servers. Maybe at that point Apple will just remove the authorization requirement from iTunes??? I'm certainly not going to pay hundreds of dollars to upgrade all of my music. I guess I better start burning audio CDs.
post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDave View Post

I may be unusual but I don't mind Apple's DRM and I'm satisfied with the quality of the 128Kbps songs I've bought (lots of them). I'm concerned at some point I'll no longer be able to transfer these songs to a new computer after Apple decides to shut down their DRM servers. Maybe at that point Apple will just remove the authorization requirement from iTunes??? I'm certainly not going to pay hundreds of dollars to upgrade all of my music. I guess I better start burning audio CDs.

FairPlay is still in place for weekly free singles and TVs, movies, etc. I don't see these go away any time soon. So all in all your music library is pretty safe IMO. Besides, in case Apple ever wanna get rid of all these mechanism (which is a good thing for future costumers), I'm sure you will be compensated in some way. I mean Apple is evil but not quite that evil.
post #58 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

International.

Woohoo!

there is a God and his name is Steve!
post #59 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

It is always available, that is how it has been done since the beginning of iTunes Plus. So you have to periodically check back once in awhile to see if new tracks in your library are available for upgrade.

It is going to take awhile too. My first batch of songs to be upgraded only total 63 songs, a few albums, and some music video. So I might have to check back once in awhile to see if iTunes have checked my song purchases for more upgrades. But this is AWESOME NEWS!

Just received the iTunes email and downloading my upgrade of 128 items. If you purchased an album, rather than individual song, it will count the album as 1 item, rather than each song. I will have to browse my library after the upgrade to see if more upgrades may be available in the near future.

128? I had 1279!

I am glad they are not all available today... even after the update of 1279, I have over 1700 songs that will need upgrading. I see the iTunes Music Store having a banner quarter...
post #60 of 67
Abandoning DRM is great but what really interests me in the update is the switch to 256 kbps. The fact that you are forced to either upgrade in an all or nothing way is very annoying. I only want to upgrade my favorite songs not the ones that I don't listen to very often. But what really ticked me off is that yesterday i purchased an album after the announcement that was non-iTunes Plus. I just sucked it up because i thought that maybe it was part of the 2 million songs that wouldn't be updated until much later. But about 3 hours later I checked the iTunes store and it was available for upgrade. This really pisses me off. Of course you can't choose to upgrade individual songs so I'm screwed. I've read comments saying that Apple should upgrade the music you have already purchased for free but I think this is quite a stretch. But come on, atleast provide free upgrades to music purchased after the announcement. Especially because they are updating the songs in a trickle as oppose to one big update.
post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbrett View Post

Abandoning DRM is great but what really interests me in the update is the switch to 256 kbps. The fact that you are forced to either upgrade in an all or nothing way is very annoying. I only want to upgrade my favorite songs not the ones that I don't listen to very often. But what really ticked me off is that yesterday i purchased an album after the announcement that was non-iTunes Plus. I just sucked it up because i thought that maybe it was part of the 2 million songs that wouldn't be updated until much later. But about 3 hours later I checked the iTunes store and it was available for upgrade. This really pisses me off. Of course you can't choose to upgrade individual songs so I'm screwed. I've read comments saying that Apple should upgrade the music you have already purchased for free but I think this is quite a stretch. But come on, atleast provide free upgrades to music purchased after the announcement. Especially because they are updating the songs in a trickle as oppose to one big update.

I think your best shot is to write a complaint letter to iTMS service. I always do that if I screw up a download or accidentally delete valuable tracks and many times they just put said items in my available downloading queue. Your problem is a stretch but hey it's worth a try.
post #62 of 67
I'm really thrilled that iTunes got DRM free.
And best of all, for reasonable prices.
I do feel sorry for everyone who wants to/needs to upgrade their tracks but on the whole this is terrific news.
post #63 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKGuy323 View Post

Maybe Apple should consider its own in-house music label.

I don't think Apple Records would be too pleased with that move.
post #64 of 67
Was being able to play a song ONLY on five computers really so bad? Who was burning more than seven CDs off a single playlist? And if you are trying to use an MP3 player other than an iPod/iPhone, why are you using iTunes anyway?

There was actually a funny "news" article on this topic... "People with six or more computers rejoice over iTunes DRM changes".
post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiggyWack View Post

Was being able to play a song ONLY on five computers really so bad? Who was burning more than seven CDs off a single playlist? And if you are trying to use an MP3 player other than an iPod/iPhone, why are you using iTunes anyway?

There was actually a funny "news" article on this topic... "People with six or more computers rejoice over iTunes DRM changes".

Because I have owned more than 6 PCs (Macs included) in my lifetime, and I'm sick and tired of running into issues where I forgot to unauthorize my previous computers. Also, people like to stream their iTunes libraries to non Apple products such as a Wii, PS3, and XBox 360. All of them can play AAC, but none of them can play "protected media." This is tremendously annoying as well.

These are just a small portion of my utter hatred of DRM. DRM needs to go away.
post #66 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotherBrain View Post

I don't think Apple Records would be too pleased with that move.

That dispute has been settled. Apple, Inc. can do whatever the heck they please with music now.
post #67 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

But it is a needlessly rigid system, it treats a triple platinum album the same as a double rust one, and prices a new track the same as an old one. The desire to keep everything the exact same price despite difference in demand and desirability seems pretty quaint to me.

Please tell me what other circumstances outside of what iTunes sells where several different releases were priced exactly the same. New release DVDs are not always priced the same as each other, and they dropped in price in time, but rarely at the same speed as each other. Nobody that's sane goes to a book store complaining that book XY is not priced the same as YZ even if they are about the same size. Even dollar stores aren't nearly so rigid as the pricing of music tracks.

Very well said. I wish I could've said it better.

Again, I put out this question to those still complaining about the variable pricing (using iTunes as my example): Why is it ok for iPhone apps to have variable pricing, but not music?

A second question, do you guys go crazy when you go to Target, Best Buy, etc. and see that all the prices are different? OMG!!!!

Get over it. Seriously.
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