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iTunes DRM-free, but upgrading comes with strings attached - Page 4

post #121 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabon View Post

Seriously? Your IQ isn't high enough to get this? Read the first section again. The part about you not getting paid because everyone else is doing your job for free.

People do my job for free. Lots of them. I still get paid because I produce work that is worth paying for, and I supply it to my customers the way they want it instead of telling them how to take it. And lots of people do all kinds of jobs for free, they are called hobbies.

People don't pay for music because it's most of it is not worth paying for. Some of it's not even worth the time it takes to download it.

Besides, I wasn't even talking about taking music because you can. I was talking about downloading movies, because the file formats are easier to work with. No DRM, ever. Just works, as is, on any computer, in any DVD player. I only watch it once and trash it anyway, so it's still more like the public library.
post #122 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

People do my job for free. Lots of them. I still get paid because I produce work that is worth paying for, and I supply it to my customers the way they want it instead of telling them how to take it. And lots of people do all kinds of jobs for free, they are called hobbies.

People don't pay for music because it's most of it is not worth paying for. Some of it's not even worth the time it takes to download it.

Besides, I wasn't even talking about taking music because you can. I was talking about downloading movies, because the file formats are easier to work with. No DRM, ever. Just works, as is, on any computer, in any DVD player. I only watch it once and trash it anyway, so it's still more like the public library.

Music that is not worth buying I don't download. It's as simple as that. There are plenty of ways to preview music, maybe not the whole song, but enough of the song to get a very good idea if I want it or not.

Has there EVER been songs I wish I hadn't bought? Later yes. But at the time no. It was worth the 99 cents (plus sales tax) at the time. Playing it and enjoying it a few times is worth that much.

When I talk about your job, I am talking about YOUR job and not someone's job like yours. This is a true statement since you still get paid. Would you do your job for free and not have any other income? Are you expecting people that write and perform songs to have a day job and not get money for their work?

No, downloading a movie for free and watching it once is STILL not like getting it from the library. You are just trying to find some way to validate your downloading paid content for free. Despite what you think. It is still not the same. The fact that you can't understand that ...
post #123 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

If file sharing is stealing, then public libraries are organized crime.

have you ever heard of IP (intellectual property)? While nothing physical (unless you want to call the bits physical bits of space, which they are) is being "stolen", you are stealing someone's IP. Pure and simple. That is the law, deal with it.
post #124 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

The neat part is, you can make a copy of a digital file without taking the original, so nothing gets stolen.

If file sharing is stealing, then public libraries are organized crime.

Libraries are not meant get items and copy them. When you are thru with it (a CD or a downloaded digital audiobook) at the end of your checkpout period, it should be deleted.
Go ask your librarian if you can make copies adn keep them.
post #125 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Besides, I wasn't even talking about taking music because you can. I was talking about downloading movies, because the file formats are easier to work with. No DRM, ever. Just works, as is, on any computer, in any DVD player. I only watch it once and trash it anyway, so it's still more like the public library.

If someone is watching the same copy of the same "stolen" movie you are watching at the same time, then something has been stolen. If only one person were watching at a time (enforcing this would require DRM), then the download/view would most likely be deemed legal in a court of law.

and don't delude yourself. If you are coming to acquire property that isn't yours that someone else still has a copy of, then something has been stolen.

I mean, is it illegal to break into a blockbuster when they are closed (so no one else could have rented it in the time that you have it), watch a DVD, then bring it back and put it on the shelf?
yes, yes it is illegal. Why? Because you are viewing something which is meant to be distributed for pay, and you are viewing it for free.

Is movie hopping at a theater illegal? Despite the fact that you only watch it once, you're still stealing.

You're logic is fallacious. If you're gonna steal, at least have the balls to admit that is exactly what you are doing.
post #126 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by YodaMac View Post

Not sure what all the fuss is about.

The only reason to upgrade is if you plan on illegally sharing your music with other people, right? WRONG

If your music has played fine on your iPod and Mac all this time - it still will. TRUE

If you're a true audiophile (nut), then you'd be buying physical media and ripping your own. NOT NECESSARILY...some singles are rare and hard to find or it's just cheaper and a lot easier to to download than to scour CD shops for them.

Those few bits improvement aren't going to make your iPod sound any better in the car or jogging through noisy streets anyways, right? WRONG Even a moderately priced mid-range headphone should make the difference noticeable. To many, the difference between 128 and 256 is the difference between unacceptible and acceptible audio quality.

I have NEVER had an issue with DRM in all the years I've been using iTunes. So what's the fuss all about? So you speak for everyone? I'm sure the majority disagree that the restrictions on DRM do cause issue, such as limited CD-burning for personal use.
post #127 of 127
I tried to purchase an album on the uk version of itunes this morning and was presented with new terms and conditions to allow for a-la-carte purchase of itunes upgrades.
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