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Apple rules out "iPhone nano," critically watching Mac netbook - Page 3

post #81 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

...Obviously not someone such as yourself.

Nicely said, monstrosity.

Also, regards the speaker, hillstones mustn't have used an iPhone because he'd already know that it has TWO speakers in it. One for the phone for your ear, and the other is in the bottom for audio.
post #82 of 89
Wow, somebody sure has a bug up his butt about netbooks. At least ten separate posts on page 2 alone from that one poster.

Hey, Hillstones, have you ever wondered what the "multi-quote" button below each post is for?

For the record, not that he'll believe me, I'm very happy with my MSI Wind running Leopard, and so are a lot of other people as evidenced by the Mac section of the MSIWind.net forums.
post #83 of 89
Netbooks are a fad. And certainly they are mostly popular based on price. I doubt very many consumers use netbooks as their only computer.
post #84 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clive At Five View Post

That's exactly what they said about low-end flash-based iPods.

I'm not sure if there's a analogous solution with a smaller screen, but it should be noted that Apple often slams a market before entering it themselves shortly thereafter.

-Clive

You're correct from a device perspective. The difference, however, is the markets. When Apple released the iPod shuffle, the market was still relatively new. In addition, Apple could leverage their exisiting market power in online music sales via Fairplay/iTunes because no other flash based player could play Fairplay AAC files purchased from iTunes.

By comparison, the 'non-smart' phone market is very mature and relatively saturated with several dominant players (nokia, sony/ericson, moto, samsung etc). Apple may be able to leverage the App store, but most apps would probably need to be re-coded esp for an iPhone nano given its reduced size and capabilities.
post #85 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Pocketable computers can also be great and even expensive:

OQO model 2+
454 g
http://www.oqo.com

Sony Vaio P Series
630 g
http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/...tegoryId=16154

What for? For Apple Keynote and Microsoft PowerPoint presentations without having to carry large and heavy laptops! Yes, even the MacBook Air is too large and heavy (1.3 kg).

Agreed, but there's no technical reason why an enhacned iPhone/iPod touch couldn't also be used for this purpose. Why would Apple go to the expence of creating brand new hardware when they could address the need with an existing platform?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbjai View Post

I suppose I'm personally saying I want a smaller version of the iphone without it losing any functionality

Sure, but in many ways, the exisitng iPhone is already pushing the envelope in what can be done with it's current size - hence all the complaints re battery life. It will get smaller gradually, but I wouldn't expect dramatic decreases anytime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I really don't think iPhones can really replace what a netbook can do. The form factor is very different and fits different uses. Netbooks can operate regular desktop software without changes. I think they're mostly machines for people that need a machine to run desktop software but need to carry them a lot more than they actually use them, because carrying something for hours at a time can be fatiguing.

I hope Apple can somehow find a way to satisfy this market if it's a market that is here to stay, and can do it in a way that doesn't undercut their regular notebooks needlessly.

Sure, an iPhone may not be able to everything a netbook can do, but to address that most of that market it only really needs to do most of what a netbook can do. This could be achieved largely by better software (eg basic WP/spreadsheet/presentation tools, copy/paste, better bluetooth stack for use with foldable keyboards etc). The rest of the market can be addressed by a slightly cheaper Macbook air or Macbook.
post #86 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

They specifically wanted something like the netbook which is small and easy to carry and did not need a powerful laptop for its intended uses which would mostly be to check email and send a few pictures to family/friends when traveling. The size and weight seemed to be the most important consideration.

This is precisely the target. I don't need power, just need *enough* power. I do need portability.
I was such a person, and I was very keen on the MacBook Air as a solution. Only the price deterred me.

I ended-up with an MSI Wind - and installing OS X.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

If these devices are canabalizing anything, it would be so called smart phones, which are not very smart at all in the experience of a lot of people.

From my experience, if Apple produced a low price netbook, it certainly would harm the sales of the Air, and possibly the cheaper Macbooks.

C.
post #87 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

From my experience, if Apple produced a low price netbook, it certainly would harm the sales of the Air, and possibly the cheaper Macbooks.

C.

But isn't that always the case? Just about every new model of anything takes some sales from an existing product. This is why people are paid money to try to figure out what the net effect will be from adding or deleting a product. The only sure-fire way to avoid all cannibalization is to only sell one product.
post #88 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post

But isn't that always the case? Just about every new model of anything takes some sales from an existing product. This is why people are paid money to try to figure out what the net effect will be from adding or deleting a product. The only sure-fire way to avoid all cannibalization is to only sell one product.

Sure, but the thing with netbooks is.....

Is anyone making any money on them at all? How many netbooks would Apple have to sell to match the profit of a single MacBook air. 10, 20?

C.
post #89 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Sure, but the thing with netbooks is.....

Is anyone making any money on them at all? How many netbooks would Apple have to sell to match the profit of a single MacBook air. 10, 20?

C.

The answer could be anywhere from 1 to 100, depending on the price, cost, and other factors. As I mentioned earlier, people are paid money to figure out all of these scenarios and we can't do it for them on a message board.
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