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Windows 7 vs. Snow Leopard: Microsoft's comeback plan - Page 2

post #41 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

They do not call it 7.0. They call it 7 because it is the 7th version of the OS (as they count it). The kernel does get the number 6.1 because of compatibility concerns. A lot of apps look for the main version number (6) before installation. Becasue Windows 7 does use the same driver models as Vista, this does make a lot of sense.

If you really believe that the world's most ubiquitous platform can't handle a version number increment without failure, then sure, Windows 7 needed to be numbered as 6.1 internally while beta testers are told it is version 7000.0 and it is marketed as version 7 of the NT kernel OS (a system which never had a version prior to 3.1, but whatev).

Regarding the "Snow Leopard is Leopard SP1 !!!" comment, Apple has already released six free "service pack" updates to Leopard, and will likely pop out another one or two before SL appears. So no.

Additionally, Snow Leopard has a number of significant kernel updates that warrant a new major version number update (as Vista did), as the next segment will indicate. And of course, it wasn't the 6.0 numbering scheme for Vista that cause compatibility problems, it was changes to the driver model and other upheavals that did. So Microsoft is lying about having its hands tied at 6.x.
post #42 of 125
Let's call it Vista 7 just to annoy Microsoft marketing.

Does Vista 7 still need antivirus? If so then it's unfit for purpose.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply
post #43 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

They do not call it 7.0. They call it 7 because it is the 7th version of the OS (as they count it). The kernel does get the number 6.1 because of compatibility concerns. A lot of apps look for the main version number (6) before installation. Becasue Windows 7 does use the same driver models as Vista, this does make a lot of sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisDias View Post

The problem with this rationale is that Windows XP was also 5.1, because of compatibilities issues with Windows 5.0 (Win2000, great OS btw), but it didn't got to be "OS number 6". That went to Vista. So the logic is entirely different. The only reason why Windows Seven is 7, although it is "6.1", is from a pure marketing point of view. They want to market it as being different than Vista, and Seven is a good marketing cool number.

Other way to see it is by asking what will be the number of next OS. Will it be 6.2? Or will it be 7.0, despite it not being "Seven"? Or will it pass "7.0" to "7.1" (which would be ridiculous) or "8.0"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

Let's call it Vista 7 just to annoy Microsoft marketing.

I think I see a "I'm a Mac, and I'm a PC" ad coming out of this.....
post #44 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

- MS never attempted to tie Vista's desktop search to Live Search! Google complained because they want to use their search technology inside of Vista. Can you change the desktop search provider for Spotlight in OSX? You can with Vista SP1.

- MS did not jumped on the multitouch bandwagon. You may know that they have invested long ago in research projects (like PlayAnywhere) and that Windows is fully controllable with touch since the introduction of the Tablet PC Edition years ago.

Thanks for posting that. I was sure that Microsoft introduced the touch interface long before Apple did.

Not sure changing the desktop search provider is that big of a deal: it's the OS' built-in search function! I don't see anything nefarious with Apple in this.
post #45 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Wow.

How Microsoft obsessed do you have to be to try and defend this? And people talk about Mac users "drinking the Kool-Aid."

It seems some Windows fans have problems with reality also.

It's no obsession, just the truth.
post #46 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince View Post

If you really believe that the world's most ubiquitous platform can't handle a version number increment without failure, then sure, Windows 7 needed to be numbered as 6.1 internally while beta testers are told it is version 7000.0 and it is marketed as version 7 of the NT kernel OS (a system which never had a version prior to 3.1, but whatev).
.

I don't want to sound like a MS employee here but you make it really too easy:

- "7" is the name (!) of the OS, not the version number, nor the build string or something different.

- It's not the problem of the OS but the third party developers. I'm not a developer but I do know that the Windows logo program does not allow applications to look for the version number of the OS. But a lot of developers do it regardless.
post #47 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snafu View Post

Touchscreens could become far more popular if the netbook builders keep imitating Asus and do "TabletNetbooks". Asus finally has greenlighted the one it had been showing around: it looks like being just perfect (and a great candidate to go Hackintosh ).

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2009/01...us_eee_tablet/

Am I missing something? Doesn't that look like every other tablet/notebook hybrid?

I like the tablet/notebook hybrid concept, but I have yet to see one well executed. They always seem flimsy and cheap.
post #48 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

To disassociate Windows 7 from the Vista brand, the new release will sport a subdued, simplified, more conservative appearance. One example of this is the new Taskbar, which sheds layers of complicated and inconsistent cruft accumulated since Windows 95 and now simply presents one icon per running application, similar to the Mac OS X Dock (below). When selected, the Taskbar application icon displays previews of each of the application's open windows, similar to using Mac OS X's Exposé, albeit with much smaller views of the app's open windows. Like the Mac OS X Dock, app icons can now be reordered in whatever position you want, although there's no obvious mechanism for resizing the Taskbar.


The Taskbar handles half of the features of the Mac OS X Dock; actually launching an app or document still requires navigating the Start Menu. To speed things up, Windows 7 now gives users a recent and frequently used "Jump List" for each application (below). Jump Lists also appear when you right click on a running app's icon in the Taskbar, just like the Mac OS X Dock.

versus
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgiovanni View Post

False. The new taskbar is both for launching and managing active windows. Glad to see he's even tried Windows 7 before writing the article...

Now I'm confused. Are the screen shots we've seen of Win7's new Taskbar showing only running apps, or both running and non-running apps!?
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #49 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalpel View Post

Thanks for posting that. I was sure that Microsoft introduced the touch interface long before Apple did.

Not sure changing the desktop search provider is that big of a deal: it's the OS' built-in search function! I don't see anything nefarious with Apple in this.

Nor see I. But I ask myself when Google will go against Spotlight integration in OSX.
post #50 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

versus


Now I'm confused. Are the screen shots we've seen of Win7's new Taskbar showing only running apps, or both running and non-running apps!?

Both. Running apps do have a glass-like border/gradient around them just like the Dock do have that little glow spot under an icon. If there are multiple windows of an app, there are multiple borders.
post #51 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

It's no obsession, just the truth.

Nah, what you posted is patent nonsense as many have pointed out now. Also, it's word for word what Microsoft uses as it's explanation for the "7" so I think me saying you have been drinking MS's Kool-Aid is pretty much on the money.

Also, your argument was in two parts and each part kind of contradicts the other part a bit. The first part argued that, (paraphrased) "They had to call it '7' because they believed it was the seventh OS they made," (as dumb as that is). The second part argued that (paraphrased) "they had to call it '6.1' internally, because it actually is 6.1." ???

The internal version number argument has some logic to it but the first part is total nonsense. It essentially argues that they called it 7 because they felt like it and that despite it's strong resemblance to a version number, it isn't actually meant to imply a version number.

Microsoft actually tried this baffle-gab with Windows 95. I remember reading an article back then where the reviewer kept pointing out that it wasn't actually 1995 when the OS came out for the most part, and were they going to put out windows 96 next year etc.? The MS guy he phoned replied that although it was called "Windows 95" and it *did* come out at least partially in that year, that the "95" did not necessarily refer to "1995" and was instead "just a name."

MS just wants to have it's cake and eat it too when it comes to their marketing names.
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
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In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
post #52 of 125
Windows 7 Challenge
Try and turn Wireless off use Windows 7.
I'm not talking about disconnecting from a network.

On the Mac it's Airport Menu > Turn Airport Off, then Airport Menu > Turn Airport On.

I frequently do this to save power if I know I won't be near a hotspot for a while.

The only easy way I've found to do it is if the PC Laptop has a dedicated wireless on/off switch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shookster View Post

Oh dear.... I can see that backfiring.

You could equally say this:

Quote:
In OS X windows shrink in size and fly around the screen into positions they previously did not occupy in response to pressing F11, assuming that's what you had in mind.

The big advantage the peek feature over exposé is that Windows never move from their position.
Exposé is approaching 6 years old and hasn't been updated at all in that time. You should at least be able to close windows quickly to reduce clutter, Apple could even use the close icon used on the dashboard widgets.

They could also (either by default or as an option) allow for grouping by Application in All Window Mode so the windows for each application all shrink congregate in a similar area of the screen. Or they could badge each window with the application icon, or both. Basically you need some way of telling which Window belongs to which app.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgiovanni View Post

False. Glad to see he's even tried Windows 7 before writing the article...

You can launch a new app without going to the taskbar.
You can't launch a saved document.

So half false.

Quote:
Apple Data Detectors (which Microsoft calls "Accelerators")

NO! NO! NO!

C'mon Prince, do a bit more research.

Apple's data detectors (originally from the 90's and a wonderful example of Apple innovation) are smart. They know the difference between a person's name and phone number, a date and an address etc. and provide the appropriate options accordingly.

Microsoft's Accelerators (2009) will offer a translate a telephone number into Greek, look up your pet's name on Windows® Live Maps and Blog on Windows® Live Spaces about your Gran's address.

One it context sensitive and provides timely, relevant options.

The other gets in your way when trying to select text on a webpage.
post #53 of 125
Well that wasn't biased in the slightest was it.

So what if its basically a service pack, thats all snow leopard is. Not only that but how can you complain there version of iPhoto is a free download. Its probably a download so they don't get sued for forcing users to have it. Plus how is it being free worse than Apple charging £69. I only want iPhoto but Apple don't sell it on its own and I aint paying £69 for what is actually not a huge amount of extra features.

Also half the time people complain about IE6 especially people who still have to develop sites to use it as people don't upgrade and don't get anything else either. So what is wrong with MS forcing a new browser on people, that way the web can go forward. Not only that but what have you got against silverlight. Its quite possibly the best thing thats been made for the web. Capability of Flash without the overhead and a lot lot easier to program. Who else has come out with a platform for developing client based programs, web based programs, web based rich enhanced programs all in the same language. Not to mention the amount of free support they give developers is unchallenged.
post #54 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactoid View Post

But this way, they can charge users yet another upgrade fee for making the software work like it should have worked the first time. Evil, despicable, and BRILLIANT!

It's only brilliant in the context that people are that ignorant to believe it's a new operating system.
post #55 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgiovanni View Post

False. The new taskbar is both for launching and managing active windows. Glad to see he's even tried Windows 7 before writing the article...

Indeed false. An application can be "pinned" to the task bar by:
1. Running it then right-clicking its icon in the task bar and choosing "Pin this application to the task bar". The same as OS X's "Keep in dock" option.
2. Finding the app in the start menu, right clicking it and choosing "Pin this application to the task bar"
3. Dragging a shortcut or the actual app to the task bar (this option works for documents as well).

I have been testing W 7 in a virtual environment (with 1GB RAM set) on a Core 2 Duo Vista machine and comparing it with XP in the same environment. While XP is snappy enough to work with (and I do) W 7 is too sluggish to be usable. Given that the VM doesn't have vide hardware acceleration I guess this is to be expected but many operations that I wouldn't have thought should be affected are unusably slow too. I will test it on hardware though...

Initial thoughts: many nice features (many aping OS X) but withhoding judgement on performance at this stage. I wouldn't leave OS X for it but would certainly prefer it over Vista, but perhaps not over XP.
post #56 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

Both. Running apps do have a glass-like border/gradient around them just like the Dock do have that little glow spot under an icon. If there are multiple windows of an app, there are multiple borders.

Thanks.

So, just curious, when you click a running app's icon with multiple windows in that app already open, does it open a new window (as XP's Quick Launch menu did), or does it go to the most recently "interacted with" window of that app (as Mac OS X's Dock does)?
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #57 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by timgriff84 View Post

Well that wasn't biased in the slightest was it.

So what if its basically a service pack, thats all snow leopard is. Not only that but how can you complain there version of iPhoto is a free download.

The author already addressed this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince View Post

Regarding the "Snow Leopard is Leopard SP1 !!!" comment, Apple has already released six free "service pack" updates to Leopard, and will likely pop out another one or two before SL appears. So no.

Additionally, Snow Leopard has a number of significant kernel updates that warrant a new major version number update (as Vista did), as the next segment will indicate. And of course, it wasn't the 6.0 numbering scheme for Vista that cause compatibility problems, it was changes to the driver model and other upheavals that did. So Microsoft is lying about having its hands tied at 6.x.
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #58 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdawg
You could be a little less bias in this article. Using your logic Snow Leopard should be called Leopard SP1.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lafe View Post

Welcome to AI, jdawg. I actually like the tongue-in-cheek tone of Prince's articles.

Don't feed the trolls!

Jim
post #59 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Also, your argument was in two parts and each part kind of contradicts the other part a bit. The first part argued that, (paraphrased) "They had to call it '7' because they believed it was the seventh OS they made," (as dumb as that is). The second part argued that (paraphrased) "they had to call it '6.1' internally, because it actually is 6.1." ???

Microsoft actually tried this baffle-gab with Windows 95. I remember reading an article back then where the reviewer kept pointing out that it wasn't actually 1995 when the OS came out for the most part, and were they going to put out windows 96 next year etc.? The MS guy he phoned replied that although it was called "Windows 95" and it *did* come out at least partially in that year, that the "95" did not necessarily refer to "1995" and was instead "just a name."

MS just wants to have it's cake and eat it too when it comes to their marketing names.

I absolutely agree with you about their marketing strategy behinde that name. But I do not see the nonsense. They have to give it a name and 7 as a name does make sense. Like 10.6 is the 7th version of OSX, 6.1 is the 7th version of Windows. I prefer this instead of a nother silly name like "Vista" or years as names.

And yes there is some confusion about how MS is counting the versions, as I said. But this all shouldn't be so important.
post #60 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

Thanks.

So, just curious, when you click a running app's icon with multiple windows in that app already open, does it open a new window (as XP's Quick Launch menu did), or does it go to the most recently "interacted with" window of that app (as Mac OS X's Dock does)?

It does open the thumnail previews where you can click the window you want to go. To open another instance, middle click or use the Jump List by right clicking.

If you don't like it (because you have to click twice sometimes) you can disable the grouping if icons. This will also give you the labels for each opened window like it was in Vista.
post #61 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactoid View Post

But this way, they can charge users yet another upgrade fee for making the software work like it should have worked the first time. Evil, despicable, and BRILLIANT!

...Snow Leopard?
post #62 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

Nor see I. But I ask myself when Google will go against Spotlight integration in OSX.

One can install Google Desktop and use it in lieu of spotlight: it indexes your hard drive much like spotlight.

I use LaunchBar instead of Spotlight/Google Desktop.
post #63 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blobfish View Post

...Snow Leopard?

Snow Leopard introduces new things like Grand Central and OpenCL. All companies have an interest in making efficient use of multicore processors and this was spearheaded by IBM two years ago, when it urged (?funded) universities to devote time in researching this. These are significant changes and worthy of an upgrade price in my books.
post #64 of 125
Quote:
Not only that but how can you complain there version of iPhoto is a free download. Its probably a download so they don't get sued for forcing users to have it. Plus how is it being free worse than Apple charging £69. I only want iPhoto but Apple don't sell it on its own and I aint paying £69 for what is actually not a huge amount of extra features.

iPhoto is included with any Mac that you buy, so saying you have to pay for it is a little bit of a lie. Apple does not force you to upgrade your iLife suite, so at no point do you ever have to pay for iPhoto if you don't want to. And if you can't see the differences in quality of finished product and overall ease of use between iPhoto (or iMovie, Garageband, etc.) compared to MS's competing programs, then you must be blind, because it is like night and day.
post #65 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdawg View Post

You could be a little less bias in this article. Using your logic Snow Leopard should be called Leopard SP1.

It's OS 10.6 not a new operating sys. Apple just names them.
It been OS 10 since 2001. There just going to tighten up 10.5.6.
post #66 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

...Like 10.6 is the 7th version of OSX, 6.1 is the 7th version of Windows.

By the logic of considering 6.1 to be the seventh Windows version:

Windows 1 (1.0)
Windows 2 (2.0)
Windows 3 (3.1)
Windows 4 (3.11, which despite being "For Workgroups", shipped on plenty of consumer systems, including my own family's first PC)
Windows 5 (4.0/"95")
Windows 6 (4.10/"98")
Windows 7 (5.1/"XP")
Windows 8 (XP SP1)
Windows 9 (XP SP2)
Windows 10 (XP SP3)
Windows 11 (6.0/"Vista")
Windows 12 (Vista SP1)
Windows 13 (6.1/"7")

And that's leaving out a whoooooooole bunch, including all those NTs before they got merged into the consumer line in XP.
post #67 of 125
Dear Mr. Ballmer,

I'm sorry to have to bother you but you really have me confused. Is Windows 7 really called windows 7 or is it Windows 6.1 (6+1=7? ) or is it Windows 7000.0 or is it Windows Vista SP2 or is it Mojave but no you told me it was really Vista. I just wish you would make up your mind and let me know what it really is.

You said it is the "best version of Windows ever" but that is what you told me about Vista before I bought that. Does that mean that I will be as frustrated using Windows 7 aka Windows 6.1 aka Windows 7000.0 aka Windows Vista SP2 aka Mojave as I was with Vista when I bought it? And I have to pay an upgrade fee to upgrade from Vista to 7 or whatever you call it? Why can't I just install Vista SP2 and have a real OS that works?

Will you please tell me what it is called so I can be clear when I call your support hotline for weeks getting my pc to run after installing this new version of windows.

Thank you
Dazed and confused

PS - is your name really Steve Ballmer or is it ....
post #68 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shunnabunich View Post

By the logic of considering 6.1 to be the seventh Windows version:

Windows 1 (1.0)
Windows 2 (2.0)
Windows 3 (3.1)
Windows 4 (3.11, which despite being "For Workgroups", shipped on plenty of consumer systems, including my own family's first PC)
Windows 5 (4.0/"95")
Windows 6 (4.10/"98")
Windows 7 (5.1/"XP")
Windows 8 (XP SP1)
Windows 9 (XP SP2)
Windows 10 (XP SP3)
Windows 11 (6.0/"Vista")
Windows 12 (Vista SP1)
Windows 13 (6.1/"7")

And that's leaving out a whoooooooole bunch, including all those NTs before they got merged into the consumer line in XP.

I'm assuming you're just trying to be silly, but NT didn't get merged into the consumer version of Windows. It replaced it.

And if you're going to count every service pack, Snow Leopard would be more appropriately called something around OS XXXVI, would it not? Sorry, I might be underestimating the service packs but I'm too lazy to look up what the character for 50 is in Roman numerals.
post #69 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

I passed the article on to my son. After he read it, all he said was, "Well dad, the only time a 7 is better than a 10 is in golf."

So Windows 95 kicks a*ses then..?
post #70 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

I'm assuming you're just trying to be silly, but NT didn't get merged into the consumer version of Windows. It replaced it.

And if you're going to count every service pack, Snow Leopard would be more appropriately called something around OS XXXVI, would it not? Sorry, I might be underestimating the service packs but I'm too lazy to look up what the character for 50 is in Roman numerals.

You assume correctly. And my bad on the history; I meant it more in the sense that the consumer and NT lines had been separate, and were then "ideologically" converged into one line, which indeed happened to involve chucking the non-NT stuff.

But anyway, the "big cat" names are specific to each 10.x.0 release. They don't try to be a surrogate version number like the "Windows 7" moniker. It's pretty clear, and well-understood, that each of them is an upgrade to the Mac OS 10 codebase (and set of ancillary apps, etc.) You could look at this particular revision of Windows (6.0-to-6.1), as well as the 9x releases (4.0-to-4.1), as being a somewhat similar idea to Apple's 10.x releases making a revision that still falls within the same major version number, but contains changes significant enough (by whoever's standards) to warrant release as a new product. If, say, Vista were Panther, 6.1 a.k.a. "7" would be Tiger.

Hope that clears up what I meant. I was just teasing TiAdiMundo about calling 6.1 the "seventh" version of Windows in order to justify MS' marketing, when such justification created a double standard when compared to all the other versions of Windows, which didn't receive artificially inflated version numbers despite having multiple releases within major versions. Cheers.
post #71 of 125
If this site is going to bash microsoft atleast stop lying about microsofts procuts.

You can so launch pinend applications from the new taskbar. with firefox you just have to click on the firefox icon to launch it.

The article states you can only launch programs from the start menu which is just untrue.

also saying about touch. Bill gates said a while back about touch features and said tablet pc's would become big. Before apple even had the first iphone.

Come on what ever happened to arguing with actual facts?
post #72 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

It does open the thumnail previews where you can click the window you want to go. To open another instance, middle click or use the Jump List by right clicking.

If you don't like it (because you have to click twice sometimes) you can disable the grouping if icons. This will also give you the labels for each opened window like it was in Vista.

So left-clicking the icon brings up the thumbnail previews of that apps associated windows? Then you click on the thumbnail of the window you want?

Thanks again.
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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post #73 of 125
xxxxxxxxxx
post #74 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shookster View Post

Oh dear.... I can see that backfiring.

Much as I have played with 7, it works fine and is not obtrusive.

That being said, I didn't find it much useful. Well, OK, I can see myself using half-screen "compare" feature once in a while, but hardly a feature to droll for.
post #75 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgiovanni View Post

False. The new taskbar is both for launching and managing active windows. Glad to see he's even tried Windows 7 before writing the article...

Couple of falses there. While writing is OK, information presented is pretty poor. I was, for example, not aware that Apple is making their own video hardware which author claims, but what to make out of following statement: (quote) "In contrast, Apple itself builds all of the video hardware that can be used with Mac OS X...". I presume author is talking about web cams, not video cards etc... but even then, it is very unlikely that Apple is actually making them. They are probably carefully selecting manufacturer and, since they officially support limited selection of hardware, I'd expect they do thorough test of that hardware (and associated software) - something MS hardly can achieve... Nevertheless, that information is false. Heck, video hardware with Mac support can be purchased from other manufacturers; Logitech, for example, has at least one advanced web cam for Mac.
post #76 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiAdiMundo View Post

I absolutely agree with you about their marketing strategy behinde that name. But I do not see the nonsense. They have to give it a name and 7 as a name does make sense. Like 10.6 is the 7th version of OSX, 6.1 is the 7th version of Windows. I prefer this instead of a nother silly name like "Vista" or years as names.

And yes there is some confusion about how MS is counting the versions, as I said. But this all shouldn't be so important.

That is probably the best point so far. Many companies at some point change naming philosophy; Adobe products had plain numbers before they became CS, CS2... CorelDRAW was advancing numbers in name until version 12, but for version 13 they decided to go for X3, and follow up was X4 (they claimed people wouldn'tt like "unlucky" number 13 in product's name, and solution was smart - since X is Roman for 10, they changed naming while keeping it at the same time ).

What is important here is if 7 improves on Vista more than skin deep... or not. MS still claims final version will be leaner and will run on weaker hardware than vista is comfortable with (presumably netbooks). At this point, Vista is OK stability and performance wise on reasonable hardware (which, from my point of view, really is perfectly reasonable for nowadays standards), so if 7 manages to further reduce minimum hardware requirements while keeping good points Vista does have today, it should do OK.

I'm personally OK with Vista - my new incoming box will run Vista 64 - so I'm not too anxious to see 7... but for people who skipped Vista, I think 7 can repeat same success XP did have following Windows 2000.
post #77 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeCoolDaddio View Post

You said it is the "best version of Windows ever" but that is what you told me about Vista before I bought that. Does that mean that I will be as frustrated using Windows 7 aka Windows 6.1 aka Windows 7000.0 aka Windows Vista SP2 aka Mojave as I was with Vista when I bought it? And I have to pay an upgrade fee to upgrade from Vista to 7 or whatever you call it? Why can't I just install Vista SP2 and have a real OS that works?

Not like Apple won't say that Snow Leopard is the best version of OSX ever and it'll be true, just like it will be true with Win7 I believe.

You can just install Vista SP2 and it'll be just fine. I used Vista for a long time and it was very solid since SP1. Now I'm using Win7 beta and it's much better as far as UI goes but I've got no problems with Vista. Everything runs just fine on it. Yes, Win7 is faster but I never felt Vista was too slow or anything.

Windows service packs (as well as OSX free updates) have always been bug fixes, not new features. XP SP2 is probably the only exception to this rule. Like Win7, you also have to buy Snow Leopard to get the latest features.

As for the article, it is indeed full of mistakes as others have pointed out. The taskbar can also be resized to a degree (I do wish it was as resizable as OSX's Dock) and its position can also be changed. The new Taskbar works quite nicely most of the time and the window preview feature is better than Dock's because Dock only shows the window name (though nobody probably switches windows that way).

I've really enjoyed using Win7 beta and will gladly buy it when it's released. I didn't buy a Macbook at this point because I felt that the hardware was lacking and OSX no longer gave me significant benefits over Win7. We'll have to see if Snow Leopard changes that.
post #78 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdawg View Post

You could be a little less bias in this article. Using your logic Snow Leopard should be called Leopard SP1.

I could care less what people think and I hated vista, no high end drivers for my high end firewire drivers, plus it was slow, however, I was very anti-mac when the powerPC G5 was touted as faster than AMD Athlon and such at the time it was out. Intel and AMD ran circles around it, and AMD had a better chip, similar to PowerPC in that INTEL needed 1.0GHZ EXTRA over AMD just to equal what AMD had.

Intel duo core changed all that and the switch from Apple was a good thing. While I was tied to home with PC as a developer for Giga Studio, PC only and ACID for PC only, then Giga For Mac, which got canned anyway, I bought a mac and used macs at work all the time. Post.

The big difference this time though with Windows, is Win 7 is fast, it doesn't crash, it has a lot of cool features in the dock and for workflow (about time MS) but the biggest thing is, I.T. never upgraded to Windows 7 and from what I've seen with my beta, you can bet they will so this leave Apple in the, will the present it to enterprise? They still have trouble with PUSH with iPhone, so will SNOW deliver to enterprise? I know the new file structure is great and checks for errors from all areas and is said to be great. Let's hope they can as I predict I will be getting certified in OS Server and will be working on Leopard Snow in less than a few week. Still, IT will upgrade to Win 7 , thin gis, if a enterprise needs browse and word, they can do it with LINUX, or if they want a great experience and high end servers, provided PUSH and deployment is stellar, OS X is a great choice. The only thing Apple would have to worry about would be if Micro released one OS at one low $99 price, this would get them back in the game big time. If they charge all different prices, Apple could do very well.

Time will tell.
post #79 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Unlike Apple, Microsoft doesn't have to convince users to buy its operating system; that happens automatically when they purchase a new PC.

So you're saying that Apple's users don't automatically get the latest operating system when they purchase a new Mac?
post #80 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erunno View Post

Warranted or not, Vista's name has been tarnished by ongoing bad press and instead trying to fix the broken image it is far easier to associate positive publicity to a new product. And so far Microsoft's strategy seems to work out, the Windows 7 beta is getting good reviews in print media as well as in the internet and blogosphere although it is still in said beta state. If Microsoft fixes the remaining bugs before release, and there is little indication that they won't, I assume that 7 will be a huge success.

As a fool who paid good money for a OEM install of Windows Vista Ultimate x64 on my laptop, I anxiously await the upgrade price of Windows 7 Ultimate x64.

Yes, I use a Mac at work and at home, but still...

Snow Leopard looks good on paper. I want to see the actual side by side performance benchmarks with Leopard. Storage is cheap, productivity is more important in UI response, etc.
Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
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Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
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