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Internet sharing OS 10.5.6 to OS 9.1/9.2.1

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Okay, I am trying to share my MacBook Pro's Airport connection with my old Power Computing PowerTower Pro via ethernet. The MBP is running 10.5.6 and the PT Pro is running 9.2.1.

I am able to successfully enable internet sharing on the MBP and, of course, it is set to share connection from: Airport to computers using: Ethernet. Then I run a cat5 from the MBP's ethernet port to the PT Pro's. (note: the PTP has both kinds of ethernet port; I am using the regular old cat5 port as opposed to the other ethernet port through a cat5 dongle or whatever.)

The network control panel on the MBP reports that Airport is connected and that Built-in Ethernet is connected to something or other, but has a self assigned IP. I found this odd and set the Built-in Ethernet's "Configure:" dropdown to "Off." Why should it be trying to connect itself to the internet through that port, right? Internet sharing didn't work when this was set to "off" or to "Using DHCP"...i tried it both ways.

In Network/Airport/Advanced/TCP/IP, it says "configure IPv4 : Using DHCP and an IPv4 address of 192.168.2.2. I'll be honest...I have no idea what IPv4 is. I wonder if this is a compatibility issue?

On the PTP side, I set the TCP/IP settings to connect via ethernet (it doesn't seem to differentiate between the two ethernet ports, which is odd) and to configure using DHCP server. Setting the "connect via" back and forth between PPP and Ethernet and closing, saving changes, and reopening the TCP/IP control panel results in one of three things happening.

1. The IP address shown is clearly self-assigned (169.254.111.92, etc.)
2. A weird IP address that I don't think I've never seen it assign to itself is shown (0.0.5.154) and there is no subnet mask or router address.
3. The IP address shown is 192,168.2.11, which seems to be a reasonable IP. Subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 and the router address is 192.168.2.1, which is the address shown by Airport on the MBP as belonging to the wireless router upstairs. Name server address is the same as the router address.

In all three cases, neither netscape navigator nor IE are able to load web pages on the PTP, but the MBP is able to access the internet normally.

By the way, I also tried booting the PTP into 9.1 and had the same results. Appletalk is disabled and file sharing and program linking are turned off.

Is this a DHCP issue? Could it have to do with the two separate and seemingly undifferentiated ethernet ports on the PTP (maybe it is failing to notice one or the other of them?) Does it have something to do with this IPv4 nonsense?
post #2 of 6
Internet connection sharing, especially with a wireless connection, is dubious at best.

Your router should have at least one ethernet port. Just plug the OS9 machine directly into a free ethernet port and you're done. In all honesty, how often are you going to be using an OS9 machine on the Internet? The most recent OS9 web browser is an old version of Mozilla 1.0 and even that cannot handle most modern web sites. Just plug it in when you need Internet access on that machine.

IPv4 is the "regular" type of IP address most devices have been using for decades. IPv6 is a new type of IP address that will eventually replace IPv4. Apple supports IPv6 in modern Apple hardware & software but doesn't use it by default since some ISPs might not have support for IPv6 today.

OS9's TCP/IP and AppleTalk can do some crazy stuff on old hardware (used to have much fun with Beige PowerMac G3 Desktop machines that always defaulted their networking to the printer port every time the PRAM was reset).
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vandil View Post

Internet connection sharing, especially with a wireless connection, is dubious at best.

Your router should have at least one ethernet port. Just plug the OS9 machine directly into a free ethernet port and you're done. In all honesty, how often are you going to be using an OS9 machine on the Internet? The most recent OS9 web browser is an old version of Mozilla 1.0 and even that cannot handle most modern web sites. Just plug it in when you need Internet access on that machine.

IPv4 is the "regular" type of IP address most devices have been using for decades. IPv6 is a new type of IP address that will eventually replace IPv4. Apple supports IPv6 in modern Apple hardware & software but doesn't use it by default since some ISPs might not have support for IPv6 today.

OS9's TCP/IP and AppleTalk can do some crazy stuff on old hardware (used to have much fun with Beige PowerMac G3 Desktop machines that always defaulted their networking to the printer port every time the PRAM was reset).

Haha well, the problem with that is that the router is like 50 feet away and up some stairs from the PowerTower in my home office, whose desk already has two other machines cluttering it up....and I don't know if you've ever seen a PowerTower Pro, but it's not exactly portable. And though it is a huge pain to be constantly connecting and disconnecting firewire drives whenever I want to transfer files to/from the PTP, I'm really doing this more or less for the heck of it. Thanks for the IPv4/6 info!
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Just an update. Okay, here's what I've tried. I turned off internet sharing on the MBP and turned file sharing on. On the PTP file sharing is on and appletalk is on and set to "ethernet."

On the first attempt, directly connecting using a standard cat5, I set TCP/IP to connect using PPP and in the file sharing pane I did NOT check "Allow file sharing clients to connect over TCP/IP" (it's actually greyed-out.) When I open the network browser, a window pops up asking for my remote access password. Obviously I have no remote access password. If I click cancel the network browser locks up and I have to force it to quit. If I leave it blank and click OK, remote access pops up and says "connecting...." This fails and a dialogue from remote access pops up and says that the modem is not responding. Network Browser unexpectedly quits due to error type 3.

On the second attempt, still directly connecting using a standard cat5, I set TCP/IP to ethernet (DHCP) and leave appletalk also set to ethernet and launch the Network Browser, I have slightly better luck. It launches successfully and I am able to browse the network and attempt to connect to servers. It is unsuccessful, however, in finding the MBP. I don't remember how appletalk interacts with TCP/IP, so just to be safe I set appletalk to use another port and tried again in the network browser to find the MBP. No luck. Interestingly, File Sharing restarted itself when I changed the port in appletalk, so I take it both TCP/IP and appletalk need to be set to use the desired sharing port.

I also tried, using the same configuration, to connect via Appleshare in the good old Chooser. When I type in the MBP's network address (afp://..etc.) the chooser reports that it cannot find the server, either. Now I've gotta go up to the attic and see if I can find an old crossover cable and/or ethernet hub lying around. I actually wasn't aware that newer macs could use crossover cables at all!

Okay, I've found an ethernet hub, an AAUI to 10Base-T adapter (to test the PTP's second ethernet port,) and a crossover cable (maybe i need that?). First, I'll try using the AAUI adapter. Same TCP/IP, appletalk, and file sharing settings and no success.

Next I'll try the ethernet hub. Connecting through the 10Base-T port,

+++this time I type the MBP's *built-in ethernet's self-assigned IP* into the network browser. Success! I am able to share files. Apparently using the machine's airport IP does no good...haha. Now i'll try the same thing with the standard cat5 and without the hub. It works, as well. So the connection is Ok.+++

The next thing I try is leaving everything just as it is except that I turn on internet sharing on the MBP. Still cannot load pages.

I tried running a huge cat5 from the router upstairs to the 10BaseT port on the PTP...It IS able to load web pages that way. The only thing that remains to be tried, then, is to using the crossover cable. Unfortunately, upon closer inspection, I've discovered that the cable I found in the attic is not a crossover. Ugh... I guess I'll have to make one.

Since I was able to share files using just the regular old cat5 cable I have, is it really worth the trouble of making a crossover? It would seem unnecessary if the two machines are able to communicate that way. I've still got my trusty old crimper and some extra cat5, but I'd have to go out and buy some empty RJ45's. I think, however, that the problem lies someplace else.
post #5 of 6
I'm not sure about OS9, but all OSX-running Macs do not need a crossover cable to see another MacOSX Mac at the other end. If you use a regular ethernet cable, OSX recognizes what you are doing and "crossovers" the cable in software with the other Mac.
post #6 of 6
This is just off the top of my head but. I have done this before, twice, once with my 840av, and the other with the PS3. The trick is you have to have a hub (pretty sure), that's how I have gotten it to work both times. But you also have to set the IP number on the machine manually. That's how I got the playstation to work also.

I hate to say this but, I was going to tell you to search google but I'll search right now and put the link.

The following are instructions for an XBox, which will also work for your mac...

1. On your Mac, pop open Terminal, and type ifconfig en0″ (number zero, no quotes). A whole bunch of crap will pop up. Find where it says inet 192.xxx.x.xxx (it should be 192, anyway). Write that junk down. It will probably be 192.168.2.1, like mine. Also find out your routers IP address, which is most likely 192.168.1.1 (Linksys) or 192.168.0.1 (D-Link uses this), depending on your manufacturer. If you have Apples Airport gear, the router will be at 10.0.1.1.
2. Then plug your Xbox 360 into your Mac, open up Sharing in Preferences. Turn on internet sharing, and share your Airports internet connection with ethernet.
3. On the Xbox, flip to your network settings (under system settings), and enter the IP address you got from the terminal freaky deaky earlier but + 1, like 192.168.2.2 to my original 192.168.2.1. Subnet should be 255.255.255.0, and then set your gateway as the ifconfig number, 192.168.2.1. Under DNS (back one screen, then down), put in your routers actual address for both. Test your Xbox Live connection. Your NAT might suck, but you can get on Xbox Live.

It's pretty crazy, but thats what you have to do, and you can't use a cross over cable, at least in my experiences. This is what I even tried: I connected the computer (840) to my iBook via Ethernet Hub, then did everything above, and then got a connection to my server for file sharing. I then disconnected the hub, and used just a crossover cable. NO GO.

Good Luck and

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