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New Policy at Apple Store?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
The other day I was in New York's Apple Store on west Fourteenth Street. Most of the Macs on display had had parental controls activated so that users could only access a limited group of web sites-- and apparently with the more popular models having greater restrictions. I inquired of the sales clerk who pounced on me if this was Apple's new policy. She said yes, to which I rudely replied, "New policy of treating their customers like children?" Of course she explained that some people were hogging the machines so that not everyone had a chance to try them all out, and I agreed. When I entered the store there was quite a mob about each display table but as I approached the crowds quickly dispersed (I seem to have that effect on people \) and I was finally able to try out one of the high resolution 17" MacBook Pros. Unfortunately for me though I was not able to access Amtrak to reserve a seat on the next train out of town, but that's a tale for another day.

So how wide spread is this policy, are all Apple Stores doing this, or just the more highly trafficked ones? Also I noticed the sales force seemed a bit more aggressive than usual, not trying to pressure me into a sale, but at least three of them offered me assistance within the course of just a few minutes, and I had been deliberately trying to avoid eye contact. Makes me wonder how badly the retail stores may be hurting.

What do you all make of this?
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post #2 of 5
Quote:
She said yes, to which I rudely replied, "New policy of treating their customers like children?"

You show 'em, tough guy!
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post #3 of 5
I remember reading about Apple tightening up things, a bit.

Apparently kids were camping out in Apple Stores, spending hours online and never buying anything, to the point where potential customers couldn't get at the machines.

That was my experience at the Emeryville, CA store. Kids three deep, lots of Facebook, MySpace, iSight and iChat action, and they never left. Pretty much a pain in the ass, and it' gotten better since Apple changed it up.

Sorry you weren't able to plot your getaway in store, however.
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post #4 of 5
I think the white Macbooks have full access to web sites of shit box low rent forms of travel.
post #5 of 5
I almost got into a fight* with one of the Apple employees (probably the guy in charge of the demo Macs, he wasn't in uniform) about something like this. At the London Regent St store several months ago.

Probably the really big, busy stores have a more restrictive policy.

*Probably my fault, I was quite agitated that day

Quote:
Originally Posted by andyapple View Post

The other day I was in New York's Apple Store on west Fourteenth Street. Most of the Macs on display had had parental controls activated so that users could only access a limited group of web sites-- and apparently with the more popular models having greater restrictions. I inquired of the sales clerk who pounced on me if this was Apple's new policy. She said yes, to which I rudely replied, "New policy of treating their customers like children?" Of course she explained that some people were hogging the machines so that not everyone had a chance to try them all out, and I agreed. When I entered the store there was quite a mob about each display table but as I approached the crowds quickly dispersed (I seem to have that effect on people \) and I was finally able to try out one of the high resolution 17" MacBook Pros. Unfortunately for me though I was not able to access Amtrak to reserve a seat on the next train out of town, but that's a tale for another day.

So how wide spread is this policy, are all Apple Stores doing this, or just the more highly trafficked ones? Also I noticed the sales force seemed a bit more aggressive than usual, not trying to pressure me into a sale, but at least three of them offered me assistance within the course of just a few minutes, and I had been deliberately trying to avoid eye contact. Makes me wonder how badly the retail stores may be hurting.

What do you all make of this?
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