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Watch the QuickTime stream of Apple's iPhone 3.0 Software event

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Apple has posted the stream for the unveiling of its iPhone 3.0 software overhaul and its matching iPhone SDK.

As promised, the presentation stream is now accessible for those who were unable to attend Tuesday's event at Apple's Cupertino headquarters.

During the event, Apple revealed fundamental changes to the interface for all iPhones, including the ability to cut, copy and paste text across the entire operating system (step-by-step photos), search built into the main OS via Spotlight and in core apps, and MMS (photos). The company also brought in landscape viewing and typing into software like Mail.

In addition to the details for end users, Apple has also significantly improved the features developers can access that will have an impact on users (see some upcoming apps). Apps now support purchases and subscriptions without having to download separate apps. Developers can also directly communicate with accessories, embed Google Maps or integrate turn-by-turn GPS. Apple's long-delayed background push notification system is also due and will let apps receive notices when inactive (details & photos).

Other changes, such as access to the iPhone's media library, voice recording and a protocol for voice-over-IP, have also been added; there are over 1,000 new APIs for developers to use.



For additional details, please see AppleInsider stories addressing individual topics:

iPhone 3.0 adds Copy & Paste, MMS, global Spotlight search
iPhone 3.0 to include peer-to-peer support, push notification
App Store audience hits 30 million users, 13M iPod touches sold
Developers show off new features of iPhone 3.0
Apple on iPhone tethering, Flash support, and Copy & Paste
post #2 of 26
The phantom of the Opera.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #3 of 26
Good stream, new features demonstrated and described well. Nice to see the iPhone OS leave adolescence and mature into a young adult.
post #4 of 26
watch 1.5+ hrs to announce new pricing on Apps for developers and Apple to make more $$$?
watch 1.5+ hrs to learn about copy and paste + MMS + Push Notifications?

No thanks


Thank God this is a free update. It should have been introduced in iPhone 1.0

Hopefully OS 4.0 will have video.
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post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

Hopefully OS 4.0 will have video.

OS 3.0 has video and adaptive quality video streaming, as demonstrated by the ESPN app.

Thanks for failing, but you might have wanted to watch the pres' after all.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by masklinn View Post

os 3.0 has video and adaptive quality video streaming, as demonstrated by the espn app.

Thanks for failing, but you might have wanted to watch the pres' after all.

wrong!

It doesnt shoot video...........

I dont care about watching video on the phone. I want to take video.

Thanks for coming out big guy
iMac 20" 2.66 2008/9 model
Nano 3rd/4th gen
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iMac 20" 2.66 2008/9 model
Nano 3rd/4th gen
iPhone 2G/3G
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post #7 of 26
To shhot video at quality worth using you need a better camera, i.e. a new iPhone.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

watch 1.5+ hrs to announce new pricing on Apps for developers and Apple to make more $$$?
watch 1.5+ hrs to learn about copy and paste + MMS + Push Notifications?

No thanks


Thank God this is a free update. It should have been introduced in iPhone 1.0

Hopefully OS 4.0 will have video.

It's OK if you don't want to watch it, I don't either as I already read the day's announcements, but the new APIs are noteworthy, as is the wider support for Bluetooth. The iPhone OS is a relatively new OS even though quite a bit is ported over from Mac OS X as well.

1. They had to design the basic hardware, at least a prototype before they could even start on the software.
2. They had to port the kernel, BSD APIs, and Media APIs over from Mac OS X.
3. They had to design a new UI for a new UI paradigm from scratch.
4. They had to port or reimplement Cocoa APIs as Cocoa Touch to support the new UI paradigm.
5. They had to make sure their development tools, both internal tools and Xcode would support the new OS.
6. They had to develop a relationship with at least on carrier, and from Apple's point of veiw, preferably in the US, that was AT&T to ensure that the experience with the first iPhone would be decent.
7. They had to add applications that phone, iPod, and Mac users would be expecting, and features that would make it sell even before they had applications.
8. They had to make sure that their and their partner's technical support would be able to support the iPhone properly.
9. They had to make sure that their and their partner's retail staff would be able to support and sell the iPhone properly.
10. They had to begin planning for an initial rollout in Europe.
11. Oh and they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features over the 1.x lifecycle.
12. They also had to release a version for the iPod touch, which when compared to the above would've been relatively easy since it was a stripped down iPhone with less hardware and at the time of it's release, fewer apps.
13. They were also negotiating with Labels to get iPhone OTA, that didn't happen in 1.x so they released the WiFi music store.

This list just covers the first iPhone though. If we move onto 2.0.

1. They had to begin planning to support 3rd party developers.
2. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable APIs to build their applications on.
3. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable development tools to build their applications in.
4. They had to ensure that their staff could properly support developers.
5. They had to add new APIs because at this point the iPhone OS is still in flux having only been on the market for less than a year, a little over a year by the time 2.0 was actually released.
6. They also had to being planning for an App Store.
7. They had to implement the infrastructure for the App Store, ensure there's enough server capacity and bandwidth and all that crap and plan the categories and pricing structure.
8. They had to plan the security to ensure that only approved applications where running which involved porting FairPlay to apps.
9. They had to hire and train people for the approval process.
10. Then they had to release and support a private beta so that there would be apps on release.
11. Of course they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features, some of which were expected in specific markets like Emoji for the Japanese market, and some of which were targeted at the Business market.
12. And speaking of markets, they also had to plan a worldwide rollout and negotiate or renegotiate with 80 carriers.
13. And add support for the 2nd Gen iPhone and iPod touch.
14. Something that still seems to be lagging, but something they have to do is improve their ability to deal with a swarm of contract reapprovals in addition to upping their capacity to deal with a swarm of submitted apps and developer applications.

So that's 1.0 and 2.0 covered, what about 3.0? It's just a continuation really, and the OS won't be stable or mature until around 4.0 or 5.0, kind of like Mac OS X which faced it's own lifecycle, but with more crap to deal with that would make the iPhone release and updated OSs look like a cakewalk.

3.0:

1. Continue to add new stable APIs for developers to make use of in their apps, and the big announcement here today were the new APIs. In general, most of Apple's apps are both showcases for new APIs (both on the Mac and on the iPhone it seems as well, although the iPhone is far more user-oriented than even the Mac is as the killer app that Apple markets for the Mac is a separate suite of software while all of the iPhone's killer apps are considered integral parts of the system from their point of view) as well as new features for their customers to make use of, usually anyway.
2. Add new features like MMS.
3. Up their server capacity and bandwidth to deal with Push Notifications.
4. Develop and Update old apps and add... a new app? Voice Memos was a separate app wasn't it? The notes I read earlier today didn't weren't really clear, but I'm assuming it's a separate app.
5. Oh and continue to negotiate new contracts around the world, if they're planning more countries anyway.

Seriously, your outlook is rather negative, while this list is shorter compared to the first two which isn't a bad thing since only a little of the new OS was shown, version 3 is going to be a continuation of 2.0, new APIs, a few new features, but primarily APIs and yeah, a way for Apple to extort money out of more customers through the use of bloody microtransactions as well, although if people are willing to spend a buck on virtual crap for their virtual beings more power to them, although for Apps like the Kindle app (assuming Amazon is actually willing to add a store to the App and give up 30% of their listed price to Apple and Authors and Publishers don't try to block it since Amazon is a bunch of wimps that won't even back text to speech on the new Kindle) it would be pretty damn useful.

Sebastian
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #9 of 26
*sigh* ...giving bad name to italian kids everywhere.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by masklinn View Post

OS 3.0 has video and adaptive quality video streaming, as demonstrated by the ESPN app.

Thanks for failing, but you might have wanted to watch the pres' after all.

But it's not a short presentation, it's a bit much to expect everyone to watch it, it is like a short movie in length, but not necessarily as interesting.

Also, I'm 42 minutes into it and there's only been a teaser for the feature you mentioned just now.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

watch 1.5+ hrs to announce new pricing on Apps for developers and Apple to make more $$$?
watch 1.5+ hrs to learn about copy and paste + MMS + Push Notifications?

No thanks


Thank God this is a free update. It should have been introduced in iPhone 1.0

Hopefully OS 4.0 will have video.

The nerve of Apple! Where's the built-in laser pointer or the mustache trimmer? I'm going on a hunger strike!!!
post #12 of 26
Calm down, people, it's just a video stream. It's not as if Apple is making this pop up on your desktop and tying you to your chair so you have to watch it. If you don't want to watch, don't. I personally did and found it highly interesting, but that's just me. It's called freedom, it means you can do what you want. Watch, don't watch, it's up to you!
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

wrong!

It doesnt shoot video...........

I dont care about watching video on the phone. I want to take video.

Thanks for coming out big guy

I have to agree with the italiankid.
How in the world can the company that invented Quicktime not have video capture on an Apple phone device with a camera??????
My friggin 5 year old $99 Nikon camera can even do that! I've never understood this. Is Apple merely holding back to get you to buy again and again??
Actually a $50 LG chocolate phone can do dat!
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

It's OK if you don't want to watch it, I don't either as I already read the day's announcements, but the new APIs are noteworthy, as is the wider support for Bluetooth. The iPhone OS is a relatively new OS even though quite a bit is ported over from Mac OS X as well.

1. They had to design the basic hardware, at least a prototype before they could even start on the software.
2. They had to port the kernel, BSD APIs, and Media APIs over from Mac OS X.
3. They had to design a new UI for a new UI paradigm from scratch.
4. They had to port or reimplement Cocoa APIs as Cocoa Touch to support the new UI paradigm.
5. They had to make sure their development tools, both internal tools and Xcode would support the new OS.
6. They had to develop a relationship with at least on carrier, and from Apple's point of veiw, preferably in the US, that was AT&T to ensure that the experience with the first iPhone would be decent.
7. They had to add applications that phone, iPod, and Mac users would be expecting, and features that would make it sell even before they had applications.
8. They had to make sure that their and their partner's technical support would be able to support the iPhone properly.
9. They had to make sure that their and their partner's retail staff would be able to support and sell the iPhone properly.
10. They had to begin planning for an initial rollout in Europe.
11. Oh and they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features over the 1.x lifecycle.
12. They also had to release a version for the iPod touch, which when compared to the above would've been relatively easy since it was a stripped down iPhone with less hardware and at the time of it's release, fewer apps.
13. They were also negotiating with Labels to get iPhone OTA, that didn't happen in 1.x so they released the WiFi music store.

This list just covers the first iPhone though. If we move onto 2.0.

1. They had to begin planning to support 3rd party developers.
2. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable APIs to build their applications on.
3. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable development tools to build their applications in.
4. They had to ensure that their staff could properly support developers.
5. They had to add new APIs because at this point the iPhone OS is still in flux having only been on the market for less than a year, a little over a year by the time 2.0 was actually released.
6. They also had to being planning for an App Store.
7. They had to implement the infrastructure for the App Store, ensure there's enough server capacity and bandwidth and all that crap and plan the categories and pricing structure.
8. They had to plan the security to ensure that only approved applications where running which involved porting FairPlay to apps.
9. They had to hire and train people for the approval process.
10. Then they had to release and support a private beta so that there would be apps on release.
11. Of course they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features, some of which were expected in specific markets like Emoji for the Japanese market, and some of which were targeted at the Business market.
12. And speaking of markets, they also had to plan a worldwide rollout and negotiate or renegotiate with 80 carriers.
13. And add support for the 2nd Gen iPhone and iPod touch.
14. Something that still seems to be lagging, but something they have to do is improve their ability to deal with a swarm of contract reapprovals in addition to upping their capacity to deal with a swarm of submitted apps and developer applications.

So that's 1.0 and 2.0 covered, what about 3.0? It's just a continuation really, and the OS won't be stable or mature until around 4.0 or 5.0, kind of like Mac OS X which faced it's own lifecycle, but with more crap to deal with that would make the iPhone release and updated OSs look like a cakewalk.

3.0:

1. Continue to add new stable APIs for developers to make use of in their apps, and the big announcement here today were the new APIs. In general, most of Apple's apps are both showcases for new APIs (both on the Mac and on the iPhone it seems as well, although the iPhone is far more user-oriented than even the Mac is as the killer app that Apple markets for the Mac is a separate suite of software while all of the iPhone's killer apps are considered integral parts of the system from their point of view) as well as new features for their customers to make use of, usually anyway.
2. Add new features like MMS.
3. Up their server capacity and bandwidth to deal with Push Notifications.
4. Develop and Update old apps and add... a new app? Voice Memos was a separate app wasn't it? The notes I read earlier today didn't weren't really clear, but I'm assuming it's a separate app.
5. Oh and continue to negotiate new contracts around the world, if they're planning more countries anyway.

Seriously, your outlook is rather negative, while this list is shorter compared to the first two which isn't a bad thing since only a little of the new OS was shown, version 3 is going to be a continuation of 2.0, new APIs, a few new features, but primarily APIs and yeah, a way for Apple to extort money out of more customers through the use of bloody microtransactions as well, although if people are willing to spend a buck on virtual crap for their virtual beings more power to them, although for Apps like the Kindle app (assuming Amazon is actually willing to add a store to the App and give up 30% of their listed price to Apple and Authors and Publishers don't try to block it since Amazon is a bunch of wimps that won't even back text to speech on the new Kindle) it would be pretty damn useful.

Sebastian

You left put what the iPod Touch can do. Can you fill us in please?
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

It's OK if you don't want to watch it, I don't either as I already read the day's announcements, but the new APIs are noteworthy, as is the wider support for Bluetooth. The iPhone OS is a relatively new OS even though quite a bit is ported over from Mac OS X as well.

1. They had to design the basic hardware, at least a prototype before they could even start on the software.
2. They had to port the kernel, BSD APIs, and Media APIs over from Mac OS X.
3. They had to design a new UI for a new UI paradigm from scratch.
4. They had to port or reimplement Cocoa APIs as Cocoa Touch to support the new UI paradigm.
5. They had to make sure their development tools, both internal tools and Xcode would support the new OS.
6. They had to develop a relationship with at least on carrier, and from Apple's point of veiw, preferably in the US, that was AT&T to ensure that the experience with the first iPhone would be decent.
7. They had to add applications that phone, iPod, and Mac users would be expecting, and features that would make it sell even before they had applications.
8. They had to make sure that their and their partner's technical support would be able to support the iPhone properly.
9. They had to make sure that their and their partner's retail staff would be able to support and sell the iPhone properly.
10. They had to begin planning for an initial rollout in Europe.
11. Oh and they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features over the 1.x lifecycle.
12. They also had to release a version for the iPod touch, which when compared to the above would've been relatively easy since it was a stripped down iPhone with less hardware and at the time of it's release, fewer apps.
13. They were also negotiating with Labels to get iPhone OTA, that didn't happen in 1.x so they released the WiFi music store.

This list just covers the first iPhone though. If we move onto 2.0.

1. They had to begin planning to support 3rd party developers.
2. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable APIs to build their applications on.
3. They had to ensure that developers had access to stable development tools to build their applications in.
4. They had to ensure that their staff could properly support developers.
5. They had to add new APIs because at this point the iPhone OS is still in flux having only been on the market for less than a year, a little over a year by the time 2.0 was actually released.
6. They also had to being planning for an App Store.
7. They had to implement the infrastructure for the App Store, ensure there's enough server capacity and bandwidth and all that crap and plan the categories and pricing structure.
8. They had to plan the security to ensure that only approved applications where running which involved porting FairPlay to apps.
9. They had to hire and train people for the approval process.
10. Then they had to release and support a private beta so that there would be apps on release.
11. Of course they also had to patch the damn thing and add a few new features, some of which were expected in specific markets like Emoji for the Japanese market, and some of which were targeted at the Business market.
12. And speaking of markets, they also had to plan a worldwide rollout and negotiate or renegotiate with 80 carriers.
13. And add support for the 2nd Gen iPhone and iPod touch.
14. Something that still seems to be lagging, but something they have to do is improve their ability to deal with a swarm of contract reapprovals in addition to upping their capacity to deal with a swarm of submitted apps and developer applications.

So that's 1.0 and 2.0 covered, what about 3.0? It's just a continuation really, and the OS won't be stable or mature until around 4.0 or 5.0, kind of like Mac OS X which faced it's own lifecycle, but with more crap to deal with that would make the iPhone release and updated OSs look like a cakewalk.

3.0:

1. Continue to add new stable APIs for developers to make use of in their apps, and the big announcement here today were the new APIs. In general, most of Apple's apps are both showcases for new APIs (both on the Mac and on the iPhone it seems as well, although the iPhone is far more user-oriented than even the Mac is as the killer app that Apple markets for the Mac is a separate suite of software while all of the iPhone's killer apps are considered integral parts of the system from their point of view) as well as new features for their customers to make use of, usually anyway.
2. Add new features like MMS.
3. Up their server capacity and bandwidth to deal with Push Notifications.
4. Develop and Update old apps and add... a new app? Voice Memos was a separate app wasn't it? The notes I read earlier today didn't weren't really clear, but I'm assuming it's a separate app.
5. Oh and continue to negotiate new contracts around the world, if they're planning more countries anyway.

Seriously, your outlook is rather negative, while this list is shorter compared to the first two which isn't a bad thing since only a little of the new OS was shown, version 3 is going to be a continuation of 2.0, new APIs, a few new features, but primarily APIs and yeah, a way for Apple to extort money out of more customers through the use of bloody microtransactions as well, although if people are willing to spend a buck on virtual crap for their virtual beings more power to them, although for Apps like the Kindle app (assuming Amazon is actually willing to add a store to the App and give up 30% of their listed price to Apple and Authors and Publishers don't try to block it since Amazon is a bunch of wimps that won't even back text to speech on the new Kindle) it would be pretty damn useful.

Sebastian

your point is? they missed major features in 1.x and 2.x

Finally got somewhere in 3.0

It was a plan from start.... if they gave everything in the beginning the iPhone would be boring today... finally its caught up...
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iPhone 2G/3G
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post #16 of 26
@Slewis

sounds like you know to much to be a customer....

what dept u work for at Apple? Product specialist?
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Nano 3rd/4th gen
iPhone 2G/3G
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post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeetime View Post

The nerve of Apple! Where's the built-in laser pointer or the mustache trimmer? I'm going on a hunger strike!!!

or brew coffee for your coffeetime!

(pomegranate phone for those who didn't get it)
post #18 of 26
Wow, this is the first keynote I have absolutely no desire to see.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

@Slewis

sounds like you know to much to be a customer....

what dept u work for at Apple? Product specialist?


Or... maybe he's just not as impatient as you???

I'm a developer and I've seen the frameworks iPhone is based on evolved and change dramatically from the mess jailbreakers found in iPhone 1.0.2.

Its important to examine the lifetime of the APIs as they came. Many quote that Mac OS X has a lifetime since it came around in 2000. To say this would be ignoring the many years of work on the Cocoa framework from NeXtStep. NeXt was so core to the development of Cocoa that every class in the Cocoa architecture still holds the NS prefix - Next Step. This is a developmental lifetime of more than 15 years.

When looking at iPhone OS, we need to look at its developmental lifetime and look at the way that their API's and design constraints affected them.
Unlike NeXt, iPhone developers didn't have a fundamental design structure to build off. NeXt had the window keyboard and mouse. What did iPhone have? Touch. There was no visual paradigm, no concept of how to lay out data structures effectively, no concept of how to group visual elements.

In the past four years, since iPhone development began in 2005, Apple has created a display framework from scratch - a feat that took NeXt 15 years. If you examine how the API's have changed, you will see Apple is learning. They are developing and iterating, but they got a lot of concepts right.

Perhaps when you start crying out for features with limited usefulness (copy and paste for example?) then you should remember there were more important things to Apple's engineers, like creating a cohesive and fundamentally stable platform (tho at the beginning rather thin).

If you are a developer, you should understand these constraints, and if you aren't, then perhaps hold your tongue till you realize the stupidity of the statements you are making, and the extremely unreasonable demands you place on talented, but human, Apple programmers.
post #20 of 26
Am I the only one who (for the past 3 quicktime events) cannot get a stable video stream from Apple? My garbled video comes in at 1 frame per 20 seconds, and the audio stutters regardless of high or low bandwidth versions. Were it not for the fact that I have 2MB per second downstream connection, and stable, speedy downloads from Apple on everything else, then I would think it was me; it isn't, unfortunately.

Since Quicktime gives me this, so far I've only been able to watch these streams without issue by using VLC, but even that only lasts about 1:30 before the stream dies and I have to re-open a connection and fast forward to where I was before it dropped out.

Obviously, no one else seems to be having the issue, so I'm hoping there's a solution.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

You left put what the iPod Touch can do. Can you fill us in please?

lol good one
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post #22 of 26
This just in...

Apple has reinvented the phone...

Video is so yesterday, so today Apple introduces you the iPhone Cooker!

Thats right... George Foreman Grill and Apple have teamed up!

Now, use your iPhone LCD to cook your food on the GO! Heats in seconds. WOW!

App cost 4.99 for the first 100 grills, next 101 to 300 cost 25 cents each. After 301 grills, its only 10 cents a grill... Amazing value.

!!!! WOOHOO!!!

Stay tuned for details/pics!

PS... Just Kidding...
iMac 20" 2.66 2008/9 model
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iPhone 2G/3G
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post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

You left put what the iPod Touch can do. Can you fill us in please?

Ah, I'm sorry, here you go: less. Less carrier bullshit and less in general.

Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

your point is? they missed major features in 1.x and 2.x

Finally got somewhere in 3.0

It was a plan from start.... if they gave everything in the beginning the iPhone would be boring today... finally its caught up...

My point: Operating systems are a journey, not a destination.

Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

@Slewis

sounds like you know to much to be a customer....

what dept u work for at Apple? Product specialist?

Ah I left Apple actually, well I still use their computers I mean and I never actually had a real job with them, but there was nothing there for me. My last job involved computer enslavement which involved boxing with my computer to get it to fit my obscure work and study habits, and now that that's done I've never been more productive on my real work, before that I worked in Complaints like yourself, although I must say you have a real knack for it, but it's a dead end, get out while you still can. I also worked as a Pseudo-support specialist on this forum, that was real fun, people like me would toss out some advice picked up on forums like this and somehow or another it sometimes solved someone's problem, great part-timer and it passed the time between complaints and keynotes.

Sebastian
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

wrong!

It doesnt shoot video...........

I dont care about watching video on the phone. I want to take video.

Thanks for coming out big guy

With your outlook, you would be better off to get a proctoscopic camera. And if it for personal use, one with a big, wide lens.
post #25 of 26
You can download it off iTunes instead of watching the stream.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

watch 1.5+ hrs to announce new pricing on Apps for developers and Apple to make more $$$?
watch 1.5+ hrs to learn about copy and paste + MMS + Push Notifications?

No thanks


Thank God this is a free update. It should have been introduced in iPhone 1.0

Hopefully OS 4.0 will have video.

Buy a video camera.
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