or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Apple now offering HD movie purchases, rentals through iTunes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple now offering HD movie purchases, rentals through iTunes - Page 2

post #41 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by EPad1000 View Post

Beware new (early 2009) Mac Mini users-

I have a new Mac Mini and have discovered that you CAN NOT play DRM-protected HD content from the iTunes store.

There's no problem with the Mac Mini and outputting HD video, as long as you have an HDCP compliant display. Your Mac told you this and yet you still think it's the Mini that's at fault?

Quote:
Originally Posted by EPad1000 View Post

I bought an itunes HD copy of a Smallville episode and discovered this problem. You will get an error message saying that your display is not HDCP-compliant and will not play.

You should only get that error message if your display is not HDCP compliant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EPad1000 View Post

However, from what I understand to be HDCP compliant you must have an HDMI connection

No, that's not correct. HDCP can work over DVI and DisplayPort as well as HDMI. Your Mac Mini is HDCP compliant but your monitor isn't so you can't play HD content on that monitor.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
post #42 of 85
720P, done right, is very good. I have a 720P monitor and I have to say that the picture when you feed the set a quality signal is nothing short of breathtaking.

I think the key for quality results is not waste bandwidth pumping out 1080P which is overkill for most uses but rather to ensure that the 720P version of the movie is done as well as it can. Do that and I think the vast majority of consumers many of whom have been perfectly happy with upconverted DVD will be very happy with the product.

My one question is, though, when will this option be available in Canada.
post #43 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

When they attempt to sell digital downloads for a premium over physical and warehoused product.

I'm sorry but they will never attain the level of dominance with video that the music store shares at this ridiculous pricing.

There is no way i'm EVER paying $19.99 for a HD movie download. Let's go back to the drawing board and negotiate some realistic pricing.

Hmmm lets see.

720p video at 5Mbps
No extras and basic surround audio.
No subtitles
More difficult space shifting

$11.99-13.99 tops per movie.


I will because a 500GB HD in your MacBook Pro is enough to hold more than 50 Movies where you know 20 Blu-Rays is more room and weight. Plus LED Screens of MacBook and 24" Cinema LED is great looking!
post #44 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by badNameErr View Post

No 1080p?

Yawn.

Even many of the people who have HDTVs would not benefit from 1080p. (Yes, some of us, including me, would benefit, but many would not.) They either have 720p sets, small screens, or sit too far away to be able to see that resolution anyway. Besides, at the bit rates that would be reasonable for download, I would MUCH rather have a higher quality 720p movie than an overly compressed 1080p. Even some iTunes standard def shows are a better overall quality than Comcast's 1080i broadcasts. The picture is a little soft, but I'd rather that than macro blocking artifacts, dropped frames, garbled sound, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

True. The pricing here seems quite silly.

Moreover: (i) Can one play this on an HD TV (say, via @TV) without physically hooking up the computer? (ii) Will DVD-burning be allowed?

Even for standard def movies, the purchase price of movies on iTunes has always been ridiculous.
post #45 of 85
Maybe I'm missing something...why are there HD movies available on the AppleTV which aren't available via iTunes? Are there two different HD movie libraries?
post #46 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Maybe I'm missing something...why are there HD movies available on the AppleTV which aren't available via iTunes? Are there two different HD movie libraries?

That depends how you define it. I'd say it's the same library, but that the iTunes app and the AppleTV have different access to the iTunes master purchase/rent library. Just like the iPhone OS has different access to the iTunes master library (ie: you can DL songs, but no video or audiobooks).

The AppleTV had access to HD video first so I'd guess that they are either having to add the iTunes app support manually to how the files are stored or that they have to ink ne deals with the content holders to allow them to be sold/rented in HD via the iTunes app on PCs.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #47 of 85
And, of course, Canada is left out again. Why is it always like this?
post #48 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormchild View Post

And, of course, Canada is left out again. Why is it always like this?

Off the top of my head, I'd say it's because it's a different country with different rules and regulations.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #49 of 85
The good news is that now, adding HD to the Canadian iTunes is inevitable.
post #50 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galley View Post

$20? I can get the BD in all its 1080p video/lossless audio glory for that!

plus mega special features .....and not hog up your hard drive- HELLO?
post #51 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormchild View Post

And, of course, Canada is left out again. Why is it always like this?

Well you do have the ice Hotel.
http://www.icehotel-canada.com/
post #52 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by LE Studios View Post

I will because a 500GB HD in your MacBook Pro is enough to hold more than 50 Movies where you know 20 Blu-Rays is more room and weight. Plus LED Screens of MacBook and 24" Cinema LED is great looking!

So where then do you store your taxes on your MacBook Pro?
post #53 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

There's no problem with the Mac Mini and outputting HD video, as long as you have an HDCP compliant display. Your Mac told you this and yet you still think it's the Mini that's at fault?



No- its the iTunes Store fault . READ.
post #54 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorotea View Post

Glad it was fun since you're so wrong.

I use my AppleTV for spur of the moment rentals - when its late, or cold or rainy weather. I've used it when I'm sick as a dog and I download a whole season of a show because I'm feeling so miserable and the shows help me forget how miserable I am.

The music capability is underrated too. Hooked up to my stereo - shuffling the music - I can listen all day while I work at home.

There are those that pooh pooh it, but I wouldn't trade it.

And how exactly do you search your songs and repeat your videos?
post #55 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Yeah right... The world is just beating down the doors to get that.

After having HD for the past 5 years, I've come to the realization that 1080p vs 720p (and even HD vs DVD quality) is becoming less and less of a driving force for me.

Unless a movie was specifically filmed/recorded digitally in ultra high resolution, AND there is something particularly stunning that I have to see in ultimate definition, I've found that I really don't care that much.
The fact is that for any movie that's really absorbing my attention, I am absolutely unaware of the resolution after about 5 minutes, if then.

I say again... the switch from VCR/AnalogTV to DVD quality was revelatory for most normal consumers. They are not seeing the subsequent switch to HD as something that is worth re-stocking their electronics and content for, and definitely not the top of their budget priorities, particularly in these times.

HD aficionados (particularly 1080p snobs) are way out of touch with the general market on this, and Apple knows it. They're right where they need to be for what they're trying to accomplish... becoming the digital hub for the market sweet spot.

You sound like the VHS people from 1997.
post #56 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Previously, the AppleTV was the only place to get HD movies from iTunes Store, save for some HD podcasts. This option appeared with version 2.0 of the software known as Take2.

Please I'm trying to forget- must you keep reiterating it?
post #57 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody OnThe Nets View Post

I can bite. The people that say " ALL of the movies I watch/buy are from iTunes because it is so darn convenient." are only blind Apple fanboys who don't own a proper entertainment system.

That was fun.

What's Sony got to do with it? Some of us just like movies and don't feel iTunes is adequate. I love Apple and all it's incarnations, but think there online content is lame except for the music. Now if they offered a subscription based movie rental system, that would be a different story.

Blu-ray looks amazing so it's hard to back peddle to digital download. That's all.

Never mind these fools.
post #58 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That depends how you define it. I'd say it's the same library, but that the iTunes app and the AppleTV have different access to the iTunes master purchase/rent library. Just like the iPhone OS has different access to the iTunes master library (ie: you can DL songs, but no video or audiobooks).

The AppleTV had access to HD video first so I'd guess that they are either having to add the iTunes app support manually to how the files are stored or that they have to ink ne deals with the content holders to allow them to be sold/rented in HD via the iTunes app on PCs.

Interesting.

I just tried to browse through some of the current top rentals, and I'm getting the regular SD options and a tag "Also available in HD on AppleTV".

I assume they'll all be available shortly?
Or is there an actual different availability?

ps. I'm using a 2yo MBP - it plays Battlestar HD & Lost HD purchases fine on my TV via DVI/HDMI
post #59 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody OnThe Nets View Post

I thought they dealt with that issue. I checked the Apple discussions forum and it looks to be a major problem still. Lame. I'd buy up more refurbed Mini's but mine doesn't play HD to well. The SD video plays fine though. So I guess the minis are stuck in a rut on HD. Damn. I hope they resolve this. I'd love to get a newer model.

The only option is Apple TV I guess.

What is with you Apple fan boys? Just buy a Blu-ray and enjoy the best video and audio possible.
post #60 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANIML View Post

What is with you Apple fan boys? Just buy a Blu-ray and enjoy the best video and audio possible.

Some of us don't want to pay for another player
Some of us want the convenience of a buy/rent once play anywhere system that doesn't require hacking to move to different devices.
Some of us don't want to have to drive out to a store to look for videos.
Some of use want an instant gratification of a a digital download. (This is why i'll pay more for Cable TV movie rentals)
Some of are always traveling and don't wish to carry an additional player and discs in our luggage.
Some of us don't care about about 50Mbps A/V.
Some of use don't care about the extras* on optical media.


* Have you read that the next move for the studios is to remove extras from rented optical media. While this is a dick move, I would have done this from the get go. VHS didn't have it and it would seem natural to make it an added bonus to buy a movie you really liked to see the extras. Now it's just lame.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #61 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANIML View Post

What is with you Apple fan boys? Just buy a Blu-ray and enjoy the best video and audio possible.

You know what I'm sayin'?
post #62 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Some of us don't want to pay for another player
Some of us want the convenience of a buy/rent once play anywhere system that doesn't require hacking to move to different devices.
Some of us don't want to have to drive out to a store to look for videos.
Some of use want an instant gratification of a a digital download. (This is why i'll pay more for Cable TV movie rentals)
Some of are always traveling and don't wish to carry an additional player and discs in our luggage.
Some of us don't care about about 50Mbps A/V.
Some of use don't care about the extras* on optical media.


* Have you read that the next move for the studios is to remove extras from rented optical media. While this is a dick move, I would have done this from the get go. VHS didn't have it and it would seem natural to make it an added bonus to buy a movie you really liked to see the extras. Now it's just lame.

Haven't you ever heard of Amazon, mon? They are having an awesome Blu-Ray sale as we speak.
For instant gratification- get the iProd.
No seriously get a blu-ray - you have no idea what you're missing.
post #63 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Haven't you ever heard of Amazon, mon? They are having an awesome Blu-Ray sale as we speak.
For instant gratification- get the iProd.
No seriously get a blu-ray - you have no idea what you're missing.

I still wouldn't want to spend money on yet another movie player and physical copies that will also be replaced by whatever new tech comes out after this. My old faves are upconverted beautifully on my Xbox 360 and anything else out there will be upconverted from regular dvd format too.

Also, I rarely watch a movie more than once. I have been renting HD movies off of Xbox Live and have been waiting for Apple to offer the same without Apple TV. I am one happy camper now having all the movie options from both of them!!
post #64 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That depends how you define it. I'd say it's the same library, but that the iTunes app and the AppleTV have different access to the iTunes master purchase/rent library. Just like the iPhone OS has different access to the iTunes master library (ie: you can DL songs, but no video or audiobooks).

The AppleTV had access to HD video first so I'd guess that they are either having to add the iTunes app support manually to how the files are stored or that they have to ink ne deals with the content holders to allow them to be sold/rented in HD via the iTunes app on PCs.

Well, I meant "library" as in what movies are available. The iTunes application is clearly aware of all of the HD movies available in AppleTV. So is there some difference between the AppleTV version and the iTunes version? And they roll out HD movies in iTunes with 12 crap movies? I guess now we know where the guy who managed the MobileMe rollout got demoted to.

I mean, seriously, they couldn't wait to get a few more, or at least a few good, movies ready before rolling this out? I really, really hope this is just laying some groundwork for some whatever the big announcement that is coming on Tuesday.

I any event, this is good. A step in the right direction (for rentals, purchases are a rip off). But I really wish Apple would clearly communicate and manage expectations, specifically around what the DRM restrictions on various displays/TVs is.
post #65 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Unless a movie was specifically filmed/recorded digitally in ultra high resolution, AND there is something particularly stunning that I have to see in ultimate definition, I've found that I really don't care that much.
The fact is that for any movie that's really absorbing my attention, I am absolutely unaware of the resolution after about 5 minutes, if then.

I'm the opposite. I'm more like to watch something which less redeeming content as long as it looks good. Conversely, I sometimes can't watch even mildly redeeming content in SD.
post #66 of 85
THanks. Went out and bought a DVI-to-HDMI cable and connected it to my Samsung LCD TV (HDCP compliant, I guess). itunes HD content playing fine. This whole HDCP thing is not very clear at all to the average user.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

There's no problem with the Mac Mini and outputting HD video, as long as you have an HDCP compliant display. Your Mac told you this and yet you still think it's the Mini that's at fault?



You should only get that error message if your display is not HDCP compliant.



No, that's not correct. HDCP can work over DVI and DisplayPort as well as HDMI. Your Mac Mini is HDCP compliant but your monitor isn't so you can't play HD content on that monitor.
post #67 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galley View Post

$20? I can get the BD in all its 1080p video/lossless audio glory for that!

Here here.

EDIT: Can't be bothered...
post #68 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gyokuro View Post

In my experience, many folks who claim Blu-Ray loyalty usually have PS3's. I have a PS3, but honestly only use it for gaming. ALL of the movies I watch/buy are from iTunes because it is so darn convenient. (My Mac is hooked up to my 40" HD Sony LCD) The quality really is pretty good, and not enough for my to really care about staying loyal to Blu-Ray. Sony is bleeding money with each PS3 sold so I'm not optimistic about the future of Blu-Ray, but iTunes is here to stay.

I am also a PS3 owner and as much as Blu-Ray technically is ahead, I still prefer DVD's in general. The PS3 upscales very well, and I am not a person who watches TV using a magnifier. The difference when viewing from the couch is not enough to warrant the extra £££. Also, with a DVD, I can rip it for my own use and make an iPhone version easily. Unless all Blu-Rays come with an H.264 smaller version on the disc, Blu-Ray is no-sale for me.
post #69 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

No- its the iTunes Store fault . READ.

Take your own advice and hopefully you'll realise that it's the monitor's fault. How hard is this to understand? A message says that the monitor isn't HDCP compliant so won't play HD and you're confused as to what the problem is?
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
post #70 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANIML View Post

What is with you Apple fan boys? Just buy a Blu-ray and enjoy the best video and audio possible.


I don't know if you were talking to me, but if you read my posts earlier you'd know that I champion Bluray over iTunes movies. I was just stating the option for an iTunes movie Mac user.
post #71 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Take your own advice and hopefully you'll realise that it's the monitor's fault. How hard is this to understand? A message says that the monitor isn't HDCP compliant so won't play HD and you're confused as to what the problem is?

It's *technically" the monitor's fault for not supporting HDCP. But for all practical considerations, the fact he had a problem at all is 100% Apple's/iTunes' fault for not clearly stating system requirements and for letting him purchase the movie in the first place.

Not all customers are going to know what combinations of Macs, cables, and displays will work; and Apple has done little or nothing to clarify. Will my early 2008 MBP with DVI output be able to display on my VGA external monitor (using the adaptor Apple include with the MBP)? Will my older mini with DVI be able to display HD movies on the monitor? Or do I need to purchase a new monitor to watch a $5 rental? If I connect either to my HDTV's HDMI inputs, will these older machines support the DRM as the new mini does?

This will get very messy if the only what to find out if your particular setup works is to purchase a movie and pray.
post #72 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Some of us don't want to pay for another player

This is a good reason why I don't have and won't get a appletv.

At least a Blu-ray player will play my old DVD's.
post #73 of 85
HD Movie rentals have been available on Apple TV for a while, but HD Movie purchase has not. This is the first time it's being offered on Apple TV or iTunes.
post #74 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4metta View Post

I still wouldn't want to spend money on yet another movie player and physical copies that will also be replaced by whatever new tech comes out after this. My old faves are upconverted beautifully on my Xbox 360 and anything else out there will be upconverted from regular dvd format too.

Also, I rarely watch a movie more than once. I have been renting HD movies off of Xbox Live and have been waiting for Apple to offer the same without Apple TV. I am one happy camper now having all the movie options from both of them!!

Blu-ray will not be replaced for a very, very, very long time and your post gives the reason why. You said, "My old faves are upconverted beautifully on my Xbox 360." Exactly. Studios have found that getting people to upgrade from DVD, especially upconverting DVD, to high def, be it Blu-Ray or HD-DVD, has been a major problem. That's because DVD upconverted is good enough for the average consumer. So if that's the case, good luck convincing those same consumers that they need something better than Blu-Ray.

I have a 720P XBR LCD that is so good that I really am quite happy to be using it for the next decade with little concern over what's coming next. I can see the difference between upconverted DVD and HD-DVD, which is pretty much the same as Blu-Ray. But I can also see that playing DVDs through my xbox 360 via HDMI or my HD-DVD player, also via HDMI, produces a very good picture, one that I can understand many people being happy with.

I have to say, though, that you really owe it to yourself to feed a proper HD signal to a properly calibrated TV (assuming you have a good, high quality set), even if only to treat yourself from time to time. It really is quite something to watch HD content without all the annoying flaws that are imposed on such a signal when it is compressed for broadcasting.

I have a decent library of HD-DVDs they were selling them for $5 a piece in Canada at Wal-Mart after the format war ended - so my motivation to go out and invest in Blu-Ray is very weak at this time. But down the road, I will add Blu-Ray to the mix.

On top of it providing a calibre of picture that is positively breathtaking, I don't share your fear that the studios are already planning another technology to take its place. Blu-Ray will be the gold standard for at least the next 10 years and maybe even beyond that.

When Apple does offer HD here in Canada, I'm going to try it out, just for fun but I don't see myself paying to watch movies that way unless the difference in quality between that and HD cable is such that it's worth the extra cost. I suspect, though, that there will be trade-offs that will cause me to not regard Apple's service as a proper substitute for physical media like Blu-Ray. Apple would have to bring in a subscription model competitive with cable to earn my business on a regular basis. Even if Apple wanted to charge a little more, I could live with that if it offered access to a significant library of titles.

By the way, I don't have Apple TV. I am using my XBR as a monitor for my Mac mini in addition to having cable, the xbox and HD-DVD player attached to it. So a subscription model working independent of Apple TV is something I could take advantage of. I can't be the only person in that position. Renting isn't viable for me, because the cost would be such that I could only rent about two movies a month for what my movie network subcription costs. If Apple doesn't offer a better deal than that, I'm not going to be turning to Apple as my main source of recent movie releases. Way too expensive compared to cable and right now HD isn't even an option.
post #75 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

I don't share your fear that the studios are already planning another technology to take its place.

It's 3-D next, baby! Although, they'll probably still be able to use blu-ray as the medium.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
post #76 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

It's 3-D next, baby! Although, they'll probably still be able to use blu-ray as the medium.


I wonder what the bandwidth requirements would be for that one.
post #77 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

I wonder what the bandwidth requirements would be for that one.

Well, you'd need two 1080p images instead of one, and apparently 3-D works best with higher framerates - at least 60 fps but preferably 120. That sounds onerous but there's plenty of redundancy, so with high-profile H.264 a standard blu-ray should be able to hold a movie no problem.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
Reply
post #78 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Well, you'd need two 1080p images instead of one, and apparently 3-D works best with higher framerates - at least 60 fps but preferably 120. That sounds onerous but there's plenty of redundancy, so with high-profile H.264 a standard blu-ray should be able to hold a movie no problem.

I would think that under current economic conditions the studios are definitely not thinking 3D for the forseeable future. They have only recently clued in that for Blu-Ray to survive, Blu-Ray discs need to be priced more or less the same as DVD. At DVD pricing levels, consumers likely would be buying Blu-Ray versions of their favourite movies. Seems to me the model Apple and others are pursuing is a bigger challenge to Blu-Ray than HD-DVD was.

In any case, I can't see 2D Blu-Ray being properly established in less than another decade. And even if a replacement was being touted before that, there is the problem of causing fatigue in consumers who are unlikely to be willing to renew their movie libraries every four or five years.
I think Blu-Ray and 720p downloads will be it for several years. The next big thing is, in my opinion closer to a decade away. It probably will be 3D but our current monitors will be lining landfill sites by the time it catches on.
post #79 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

It's 3-D next, baby! Although, they'll probably still be able to use blu-ray as the medium.

That is the only way I can foresee physical media persevering over the long run. But it still remains to be seen if that will appeal to the masses. The occasional 3D movie is cool, but I don't think I'd want that as the normal way I watch movies in my home or in the theater.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #80 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That is the only way I can foresee physical media persevering over the long run. But it still remains to be seen if that will appeal to the masses. The occasional 3D movie is cool, but I don't think I'd want that as the normal way I watch movies in my home or in the theater.

I disagree. I think that even without a great new feature like 3D there is room for both Blu-Ray and the download model. The difference is that unlike the preceding eras, we'll see a significant splintering of product distribution. Not everyone is going to want to download content and a segment of the buying public does care about quality enough to want the pristine quality that download technology is certainly not, at this time, capable of delivering.

The studios really aren't that concerned in that they get paid, regardless of which delivery method the customers selects.

We'll still see economies of scale in place because as population goes up, even such a splintering will not render the Blu-Ray format too fringe to survive. This isn't the same scenario as we saw with the poorly-received replacements for the CD, i.e. DVD audio and SACD. In that case SACD has barely survived in a niche market and DVD-A is pretty much toast. The thing is, though, that the vast majority of sound systems in people's homes are incapable or reproducing sound to a standard that would illustrate the difference between SACD/DVD-A and CD. And at that, a first-rate CD player (like the Arcam CD23 FMJ) will produce such quality sound that even some half-way decent sound systems would be challenged to clearly show the difference.

While the difference between Blu-Ray and upconverted DVD is not spectacular enough to wow the average consumer, most of today's newer high-def monitors, when properly calibrated, will clearly show that there is a difference. In time enough consumers will figure that out and as the installed base of Blu-Ray players reaches critical mass, if the studios are smart enough to price Blu-Ray discs about where DVDs have been, you'll see Blu-Ray essentially replace DVD.

In other words, the casualty of the splintering of the market will not be Blu-Ray but rather DVD. It's not going to happen in a couple of years but five, six, seven years from now I could easily imagine a point reached where DVDs will be regarded as a quaint, obsolete medium. People looking for convenience and not that concerned by quality will go the download route and those looking for the best possible picture and sound will go Blu-Ray. On the computer front, Blu-Ray's superior storage capacity will make it the obvious choice over DVD. We will, after all, be working with progressively more massive files as the HD Era kicks into high gear.

3D has long been with us but it doesn't strike me as being something that can be implemented in a practical manner using existing technology. Broadcasters can't even do 720p HD right so expecting them to deliver 3D content is unrealistic. Delivering it via a medium like Blu-Ray couldn't gain traction because you'd have to have an installed base of 3D-capable TVs and that's not likely to happen as long as broadcast TV can't go there. Maybe some game-changing technologies will emerge but unless they do, 3D will remain a novelty item.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Apple now offering HD movie purchases, rentals through iTunes