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Briefly: Apple still selling $899 17-inch iMac for education

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
In its March eNews mailing to education users, Apple has revealed plans to continue to offer its 17" iMac to education customers starting at $899, alongside its current 20" and 24" iMac models now being sold to the general public.

The 17" iMac for education, which AppleInsider reported earlier would be limited to education sales, isn't being listed on Apple's publicly accessible online store for education or the general public or by any partners sites.

It appears the holdover product, the same white 17" iMac Apple sold in 2006, continues to be offered in response to the global economic crisis, which is hitting government and education markets particularly hard as tax revenues slip and the public sector seeks ways to close budget gaps.

The $899 price point of the education-only 17" iMac reflects the previous 17" CRT eMac model that Apple sold to education markets as a lower priced alternative to its flat screen models beginning in April 2002. Consumer demand for that originally education-only model resulted in Apple offering it to the general public within a month.



In 2005, Apple later returned the eMac to its original "education-only" status, although it was still possible to obtain through some resellers. The company then discontinued the PowerPC G4-based eMac in mid 2006 as part of its transition to Intel. It was also Apple's last CRT product; its lack of an Intel upgrade was part of the company's efforts to move away from toxic heavy metals that are used in CRTs.

Since then, Apple's lowest end offering among its all-in-one Macs has been the 17" flat panel, Intel-based iMac, which was discontinued outside of education sales in 2007, leaving the 20" iMac as Apple's entry level iMac model marketed to consumers.
post #2 of 38
Why not just call it the eMac and swap some of the more expensive parts for even cheaper parts?
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post #3 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsNly View Post

Why not just call it the eMac and swap some of the more expensive parts for even cheaper parts?

Can you imagine Apple giving the public, during these tough time, what they want like dedicated gpu, FireWire and good CPU.

Ha ha ha ha. Falli g off chair. That will be the day especially given that for $899 you can build a hack i7 that darn near Stomps the mac pro. Makes no sense. Go hack fir low end and get WAY more bang for buck.
post #4 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

That will be the day especially given that for $899 you can build a hack i7 that darn near Stomps the mac pro. Makes no sense. Go hack fir low end and get WAY more bang for buck.

Who knew you could build a barebones machine yourself with a stolen and hacked OS and SW that is cheaper than a store bought machine? Now you're just talkin' crazy.
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post #5 of 38
given the source of the info, assuming it is correct, it is possible that it is NOT a consumer machine but one designed for schools to buy/lease for labs and classrooms. if it is marketed to teachers/students it will likely be online only and requiring validation of the 'education' status.
post #6 of 38
To the editor/writer: Apple has been selling a 17" iMac to education customers all along. I work for a public school district here in Massachusetts and we bought 50 of them last August, and continued to buy them here and there since.

This same 17" iMac computer that they are offering is a shameful rip off for education now. For the specs it should be $500. Its specs are 1.83GHz Core 2 Duo processor, 1GB RAM, 160GB HD, Intel GMA 950 graphics. I mean seriously, in this economy, $899 for that spec is a blatant rip-off. For that money it should have identical specs to the mid-range MacBook.
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post #7 of 38
With iMac 20 @ $1199 and 24 @ $1499, it would make perfect sense for a 17 @ $899. But why? Since the 24" LED screen is $899 all by itself, the iMac 17 can't be anything more than a smaller version of what is available now. $799 ... maybe. $699 ... yeah baby! Two even! One for under each arm. If this is just an "education" box, then $699 is even better. Toss a bone out for the schools. They need all the help they can get. So might Apple. Looks like they have almost pulled the plug on selling monitors, especially affordable ones.
post #8 of 38
Apple didn't announce anything, this is still the old white 17 inch iMac that has been sold to education for ages.

Screenshot taken today:

post #9 of 38
Damn, now labs at school will get these in place of the 20 inchers...
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post #10 of 38
I don't see any reference to the old iMac 17-inch.
http://www.apple.com/education/products/
Where did the screenshot come from?
post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

Can you imagine Apple giving the public, during these tough time, what they want like dedicated gpu, FireWire and good CPU.

Ha ha ha ha. Falli g off chair. That will be the day especially given that for $899 you can build a hack i7 that darn near Stomps the mac pro. Makes no sense. Go hack fir low end and get WAY more bang for buck.

I didn't say give the public what they want. I was implying that they should make a bare bones eMac that would be perfect for Highschools.
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post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

given the source of the info, assuming it is correct, it is possible that it is NOT a consumer machine but one designed for schools to buy/lease for labs and classrooms. if it is marketed to teachers/students it will likely be online only and requiring validation of the 'education' status.


Have you ever ordered any Mac on the Education on-line store? If you have, what did you use to validate your status as a teacher/student other that just picking a name of a school and ordering a Mac and having it sent directly to your house. Apple is not Adobe in reference to validating your status.
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post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Royboy View Post

Have you ever ordered any Mac on the Education on-line store? If you have, what did you use to validate your status as a teacher/student other that just picking a name of a school and ordering a Mac and having it sent directly to your house. Apple is not Adobe in reference to validating your status.

Whilst this is true, in the UK at least, you have to be using your school network when you go through this for it to work. At least to get the full discount anyway....
Anyway - it does mean that non-education customers may not be able to see this.

I think the apple picture implies that it is now updating the style to match the other current ones. About time if they are!
post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by WPLJ42 View Post

Where did the screenshot come from?

This is actually pretty easy to find once you know what to do...
Go to http://store.apple.com/
On the left hand side, click the "Education Store" link.
From the resulting next page, on the right side under where it says, "Purchasing for your institution," I click on K-12.
Then click on Create Quote. You may have to put in your zip code at this point, and choose your district.
Once you are at the education store for institutions, scroll down and you will see the $899 white 17" iMac...which has been there almost two years now unchanged.
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post #15 of 38
Not every school has room for wide 20" or 24" Macs in either the lab and/or classroom. It could also make the difference between fitting 40 Macs in a lab or only fitting 25-30 Macs in a lab because of the size.

I also work in a school district (2 of them actually) and except for creative things, large widescreens aren't really necessary. It would just be a waste of space. Most of the computers are used for simple things like educational software, MS Office, and of course the internet. They don't need a top of the line Mac with a huge display to get this done. However, I do believe they should be cheaper, maybe $699.

And yes...this is nothing new. They were selling these last year for the same price.

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post #16 of 38
I see that this topic was moved from Future Hardware to Current Hardware. Interesting. There needs to be a topic for "Old Hardware," because that's where this topic belongs. Intel GMA 950 graphics, 1.83GHz Core 2 Duo, for $899. For education market?! Apple: Give me a fucking break!
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post #17 of 38
These 17" GMA 950 iMacs periodically turn up in the refurb store, too, where they can be purchased by anyone. Last time they were available refurbished, I think they were $699.
post #18 of 38
Hopefully the kids still get a full functioned, universal, numeric keyboard.
post #19 of 38
That is extremly overpriced compared to most current Apple offerings

Dell XPS One 20" with Core 2 Duo with bigger HDD (250GB) and more RAM (2GB) is only $800.
post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beastage View Post

That is extremly overpriced compared to most current Apple offerings

Dell XPS One 20" with Core 2 Duo with bigger HDD (250GB) and more RAM (2GB) is only $800.

Compared to the 17" iMac that is a better deal when not considering SW. But when compared to Apple's 20" iMac for $1149, the additional $350 does get you a lot more, especially in the CPU.

Still, for base price of a system the value is better in the Dell. But this is expected as Dell is struggling to sell their AIO in the face of Apple's long history of selling AIOs.
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post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Hopefully the kids still get a full functioned, universal, numeric keyboard.

Most students don't even know how to use a numeric keypad. When I learned how to type they spent a day discussing how to use it.
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post #22 of 38
The price would be fine since most districts overpay for things. The problem is that most districts, mine included, now want a 3 year warrenty that covers the time the equipment is in their inventory. If Apple included the warrenty for that price it would do pretty well but when you have to add it on, the price becomes a ridiculous joke.

Because of this our district goes with a local PC vendor who can deal with the machines for three years. After that they are still being used but are off the inventory books and can be dealt with in any fashion we desire.

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post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by DHagan4755 View Post

This is actually pretty easy to find once you know what to do...
Go to http://store.apple.com/
On the left hand side, click the "Education Store" link.
From the resulting next page, on the right side under where it says, "Purchasing for your institution," I click on K-12.
Then click on Create Quote. You may have to put in your zip code at this point, and choose your district.
Once you are at the education store for institutions, scroll down and you will see the $899 white 17" iMac...which has been there almost two years now unchanged.

I don't know how to display images in my post, but there is no 17 inch iMac available after following your instructions to the letter.
http://store.apple.com/us-k12
Maybe it makes a difference where I am (California) or something, but there is no 17 incher.
EDIT - Found it, but it wasn't easy.
post #24 of 38
Nice to see Apple listens to some of their customers. There are form factors and price points the consumer market wants but Apple won't deliver. In the case of the education market I'm sure the salesmen's voices had a lot to do with it.
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Who knew you could build a barebones machine yourself with a stolen and hacked OS and SW that is cheaper than a store bought machine? Now you're just talkin' crazy.

Ha ha very funny. Truth is you couldn't and most mac users only doubted the intel switch would ever happen. I was part of x86 when the intel rumors started. Knew it was only time. Additionally, if you buy the OS it is not illegal.

The real crime is apple over charging consumers for cheap pc parts. In addition, when the cMacBook pro went unibody it was cheaper to make. Apple pass the savings to consumers. Of course not.

Glad to be correct in that Apple would release all these products while Jobs was gone. While I wish him well, it won't be until he steps down that apple will break from the iPod mentaility and branch out with mid range machines and better prices.
post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsNly View Post

I didn't say give the public what they want. I was implying that they should make a bare bones eMac that would be perfect for Highschools.

I know that dude. LOL (exit. Terrible typing. Dag nab it auto correct on iPhone. LOL)


I was pointing out tyt it's better to build a hack. I look at it like this. If you have a mac pro or decent apple product buld a hack to compliment it. A better optio. Is to purchase say a mac pro older gen from an apple employee friend.

Apple charges to much and rips off the consumer. The macbooks story kills me. They could never play games using the onboard gma yet could run fcp and motion. Knowing this. Apple went out of their way to release an updates that brought the bench mark from 171% down to 79%. She then, they released a better gpu but took away FireWire and I have lost respect for apple and support the hacks when I can. As a pro user I take these moves as a slap in the face as we stood by Apple through the dark years supporting them when everyone thought they were done yet apple turns around and dumps in the pro user since the consumer is king with the iPhone and ipods. Terrible. By love their OS
post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

The real crime is apple over charging consumers for cheap pc parts. In addition, when the cMacBook pro went unibody it was cheaper to make. Apple pass the savings to consumers. Of course not..

Cheap PC parts? Their products that are considered to be over priced aren't using Pentium CPUs or the low end C2Ds with low L2 and FSB. The CPU in the MBA alone costs around $300. Sure, you can get a faster CPU from Intel that costs less, but it's not the ULV C2D that they sell, which completely the market for the product as you can't fit typical notebook components in that system.

As for the unibody being cheaper, everything I've read points to it as being much more expensive.

Quote:
While I wish him well, it won't be until he steps down that apple will break from the iPod mentaility and branch out with mid range machines and better prices.

Jobs created Apple, Jobs booted from Apple, Jobs comes back to save Apple. I wouldn't expect another Scully to take the seat as CEO and run things like Michael Dell would. Whomever Job's successor is they will surely be Jobsian in their vision.
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post #28 of 38
I don't know about the US and I haven't checked lately, but in Australia if Universities buy Macs then they automatically get the AppleCare extended warranty.

It used to be that even students and staff got it when they purchased but now (I believe) it is only when the institution itself buys it.

Still think these Macs are over-priced but just thought I would add that comment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

The price would be fine since most districts overpay for things. The problem is that most districts, mine included, now want a 3 year warrenty that covers the time the equipment is in their inventory. If Apple included the warrenty for that price it would do pretty well but when you have to add it on, the price becomes a ridiculous joke.

Because of this our district goes with a local PC vendor who can deal with the machines for three years. After that they are still being used but are off the inventory books and can be dealt with in any fashion we desire.
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by DHagan4755 View Post

To the editor/writer: Apple has been selling a 17" iMac to education customers all along. I work for a public school district here in Massachusetts and we bought 50 of them last August, and continued to buy them here and there since.

This same 17" iMac computer that they are offering is a shameful rip off for education now. For the specs it should be $500. Its specs are 1.83GHz Core 2 Duo processor, 1GB RAM, 160GB HD, Intel GMA 950 graphics. I mean seriously, in this economy, $899 for that spec is a blatant rip-off. For that money it should have identical specs to the mid-range MacBook.

i 100% agree, it isn't much for the money. for the money, they ought to have better Cpu and a better GPU, maybe the current low end GPU that the mac mini and laptops have.
post #30 of 38
I'm amazed at how quickly I've become acclimated to my 24" LCD.

Frankly I wouldn't touch a computer with a 17" screen. That's just too small for maintaining any kind of productivity IMO.

22" or greater or bust.
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post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

I'm amazed at how quickly I've become acclimated to my 24" LCD.

Frankly I wouldn't touch a computer with a 17" screen. That's just too small for maintaining any kind of productivity IMO.

22" or greater or bust.

I went from a 15" Powerbook to a 13" MBA and that's one of the only things that bothers me, it really cramps productivity at times. But that is why I'm getting a 24" iMac to compliment it this summer when the new school year rolls around

But for a classroom setting, a 17" monitor is plenty big.
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post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Royboy View Post

Have you ever ordered any Mac on the Education on-line store? If you have, what did you use to validate your status as a teacher/student other that just picking a name of a school and ordering a Mac and having it sent directly to your house. Apple is not Adobe in reference to validating your status.

Apple doesn't ask for confirmation because you can be a parent buying a computer for a child that is in school. They have the limitation that you can only buy one computer per year at discount.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Apple doesn't ask for confirmation because you can be a parent buying a computer for a child that is in school. They have the limitation that you can only buy one computer per year at discount.

Don't they also audit random education purchases?
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Apple doesn't ask for confirmation because you can be a parent buying a computer for a child that is in school. They have the limitation that you can only buy one computer per year at discount.

Their website says you can buy one desktop + one notebook + one mini per academic year. Exceedingly generous, I think.
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsNly View Post

I went from a 15" Powerbook to a 13" MBA and that's one of the only things that bothers me, it really cramps productivity at times. But that is why I'm getting a 24" iMac to compliment it this summer when the new school year rolls around

But for a classroom setting, a 17" monitor is plenty big.

You think so? Wait until you get your 24" I'm now getting to the point where a 30" isn't sounding so outlandish hahahaha.
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post #36 of 38
I work for the NYC Dept. of Education, and my school has purchased plenty of the white iMacs, as well as the Aluminums.

Unfortunately, once you add in the cost of the custom image (which includes MS Office & Norton AV) for a large school system, along with a mandatory 3 year warranty, the price is actually $1199.

The 20" Aluminum w/ Superdrive ends up being $1546.

Pricey hardware, but when I consider how many of the NYC schools with PCs have been taken down with viruses, and how easily I'm able to administer machines and users with Workgroup Manager and Apple Remote Desktop, its worth it.
post #37 of 38
Fifty bucks more gets you the 20" previous generation iMac. (Look under clearance) And for those of you who don't like Apple's pricing, you should run your own business. They are selling what they consider premium hardware and software and charge what they feel the market can bear. If you can't bear it, get a PC with the specs and software you want. Really, this argument is old old old.
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirmausalot View Post

Fifty bucks more gets you the 20" previous generation iMac. (Look under clearance) And for those of you who don't like Apple's pricing, you should run your own business. They are selling what they consider premium hardware and software and charge what they feel the market can bear. If you can't bear it, get a PC with the specs and software you want. Really, this argument is old old old.

Your point about "running your own business" is a non sequitur and has nothing to do with the price of tea in china or someone opining about the value of this Mac.

People have every right to voice what they feel is or isn't a good deal for a particular product or servic. The argument was around before any of us were born and the argument will be around long after we're all dead.

The "well then get a PC" is the most boorish and brain-dead response a person can choke up in rebuttal.
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