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Blockbuster partners with TiVo, says Apple products in sight

post #1 of 58
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In the latest move to rejuvenate its weathered brand, Blockbuster plans to make its premium digital movie catalog available to TiVo subscribers before ultimately extending the service to devices made by Apple and other hardware vendors.

As part of the deal announced Wednesday, all broadband TiVo subscribers will soon be able to purchase or rent movies from Blockbuster's OnDemand service from their TiVo Series2, Series3, HD, or HD XL digital video recorder (DVR) set-top boxes.

The partnership will also see TiVo DVRs sold at thousands of Blockbuster brick-and-mortar retail stores as well as online at blockbuster.com, offering both parties new distribution outlets as they simultaneously band together to implement a cross-marketing campaign.

Blockbuster's arrival on TiVo will pit it against Netflix and Amazon.com, which already offer digital catalogs to TiVo subscribers. However, the movie rental house believes its catalog will stand out against those of its rivals, which tend to include mostly older titles rather than recent movie theater hits.

The move is also said to be the first of many that will see Blockbuster broaden its reach to embrace the growing demand on the part of consumers to enjoy video at their leisure through a new array of handheld devices and set-top-boxes in the living room.

"You will see us in a large number of other devices going forward," Blockbuster's vice president of digital entertainment Kevin Lewis told Reuters. He added, without providing details, that the company also plans to make its services available on devices sold by Apple.

"We need to be in the normal places that consumers want to watch movies," he said.

In total, about 10,000 movies titles will be available to TiVo subscribers when the integrated service launches some time during the second half of this year. Although pricing details having been announced, Blockbuster currently sells film rentals over its online service for $2 to $4, while movie purchases are priced around $10.
post #2 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In total, about 10,000 movies titles will be available to TiVo subscribers when the integrated service launches some time during the second half of this year.

10,000? Apple only has about 2,500 doesn't it? That's huge.

I hope they do get access to AppleTV. I'd much rather have AppleTV giving me access to a variety of sources (but I'm happy to be forced to use iTunes if any movie is available on both Apple & Blockbuster).

ps.
Blockbuster is about to start movie rentals direct to TiVo in Australia, it was supposed to start in March but now April.
post #3 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


"You will see us in a large number of other devices going forward," Blockbuster's vice president of digital entertainment Kevin Lewis told Reuters. He added, without providing details, that the company also plans to make its digital catalog available on devices sold by Apple, possibly signaling tie-ins with the Cupertino-based company's Apple TV set-top-box and iPhone products.


I don't take that quote to mean that they will be working with the Apple TV at all. Apple only delivers media through iTunes and I can't see how Blockbuster has the contractual right to put movies in iTunes. More than likely he was referring to some kind of Blockbuster application for the iPhone/iPod Touch.

However, it would be a much bigger story if this is a hint that Apple is preparing to release a SDK for the Apple TV like they have for the iPhone which will allow 3rd-parties to run applications on the Apple TV. Now that would really be news!
post #4 of 58
When this takes off for real, im getting myself a 'rent movies over the internet' thingy for my TV.
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post #5 of 58
I wouldn't put it past Apple to open up AppleTV to blockbuster and others (netflix?). If Apple took 30% of all purchases, they could make a killing off of others' subscription models/rentals. They might have to concede since the movie industry is holding them back (their selections are pathetic). Blockbuster and Netflix would greatly add to their library.
post #6 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

...Apple...might have to concede since the movie industry is holding them back (their selections are pathetic)....

You've got that right. Most of the time when i look for a title it's not available.

Does anyone have stats on how many films are available for rent on AppleTV, Blockbuster, and other competing sources? It seems like that ought to be data someone's tracking.

Apple ought to agree to such a deal, to break the stranglehold the studios have on it.
post #7 of 58
Who do companies like BB hire to set all this up? There must be only a couple players in the game who can manage to set up an online system like this yea? Is BB actually doing the contracting or do the movie companies take care of this? How does BB get the permission to convert the movie to online formats and how many systems exist that can deliver online movies?
post #8 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by troehl View Post

However, it would be a much bigger story if this is a hint that Apple is preparing to release a SDK for the Apple TV like they have for the iPhone which will allow 3rd-parties to run applications on the Apple TV. Now that would really be news!

The AppleTV Jukebox is probably such a huge generator of iTunes revenue (it's totally geared toward buying and renting iTunes content) , I doubt it will ever get SDK.And it's 2 years old already.
post #9 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham View Post

Apple ought to agree to such a deal, to break the stranglehold the studios have on it.

AS opposed to the stranglehold Apple has on the Apple TV itself?
post #10 of 58
The whole online video rental 'thing' is obviously in its infancy and at the moment it is completely fragmented and to be honest, stupid. The fact that not all video content is rentable and viewable by anybody, no matter what hardware they have is not only lame but old fashioned, counter productive and consumer un-friendly. For any company - Apple included - to impose artificial hardware barriers is wrong wrong wrong. I should be able to rent a movie from any source and view it through my Apple TV, Tivo box, or whatever hardware I have. I used to go to BB and get a DVD and pop it into any player, PC or dedicated, and watch the content I had rented. I REALLY resent being tied to a specific hardware solution.
post #11 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

The whole online video rental 'thing' is obviously in its infancy and at the moment it is completely fragmented and to be honest, stupid. The fact that not all video content is rentable and viewable by anybody, no matter what hardware they have is not only lame but old fashioned, counter productive and consumer un-friendly. For any company - Apple included - to impose artificial hardware barriers is wrong wrong wrong. I should be able to rent a movie from any source and view it through my Apple TV, Tivo box, or whatever hardware I have. I used to go to BB and get a DVD and pop it into any player, PC or dedicated, and watch the content I had rented. I REALLY resent being tied to a specific hardware solution.

Hear, hear.
post #12 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

The whole online video rental 'thing' is obviously in its infancy and at the moment it is completely fragmented and to be honest, stupid. The fact that not all video content is rentable and viewable by anybody, no matter what hardware they have is not only lame but old fashioned, counter productive and consumer un-friendly. For any company - Apple included - to impose artificial hardware barriers is wrong wrong wrong. I should be able to rent a movie from any source and view it through my Apple TV, Tivo box, or whatever hardware I have. I used to go to BB and get a DVD and pop it into any player, PC or dedicated, and watch the content I had rented. I REALLY resent being tied to a specific hardware solution.

Don't fret friend. I was just talking about movie going from theater to home last night. Ten years ago, I predicted who ever got the compression right will win. Well we're not there yet but someday DVDs will be gone as so will dvrs. All content will be on the tv via flash hard drives. All tvs will have tera bytes of storage. As screens get bigger and light pipe more common, we"ll even see movies direct to homes. Even the theaters may be in trouble, butfor now are safe. We're almost there. Specefic dvrs will be gone in five years and you will only need a common tv as they will all include recording as manufactures will be tied to delivery content providers. Don't be surprised if Apple makes the first device.
post #13 of 58
The Mac is an "Apple device," yet Blockbuster has never bothered to get their download service to work on OSX.
post #14 of 58
TiVo?

We used to have TiVo and then found it cheaper to add the digital recorder from the cable company - they even come out to the house and replace it if there is a problem. The TiVo was taken to Goodwill.

Actually i didn't know TiVo was doing well enough to be a major player these days.
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post #15 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by akabaka View Post

The Mac is an "Apple device," yet Blockbuster has never bothered to get their download service to work on OSX.

Don't blame Blockbuster. Their movies are almost certainly delivered with Windows Media DRM, something Microsoft hasn't made available for non-Windows platforms. Apple has refused to license their Fairplay DRM (which would allow competing services, like BB, to provide streaming content to non-Apple devices). Netflix has made content available to Mac users, but only by using Silverlight as a delivery system. I hear it works well, but I've not tried it. I can't imagine that it provides the same experience as the downloadable HD content I can rent on my Apple TV.

If we're to see platform-independent content, then Apple would need to license Fairplay (and release QuickTime for other Unix platforms). Then Netflix, Amazon, Blockbuster and everyone else in the business could convert their content to h.264 (like YouTube did). That way everyone could view content via iTunes on their computers, or by way of QuickTime on a dedicated box (like a TiVo). I don't see the incentive for Apple to do so, although I think Apple really should license the technology to Blockbuster. I think the BB/TiVo partnership is mainstream enough that it could really take what little steam there is in the Apple TV platform.

While it's clearly not going to happen overnight, I think we all agree that downloadable content is the future. Apple has a slight advantage because of the iPod/iTunes ecosystem, and to maintain that, they'll need to do something to either compete with or partner with someone who's got the content. BB's policy (30 days to start, 24 hours to finish) is the same as Apple's. I can't tell if they've got much advantage in terms of content - on initial look, it seems like much of their content is somewhat obscure (they're probably competing more with Jaman than with Apple). I think their biggest advantage is the delivery system. How many TiVos are in the wild, vs Apple TVs?

However, the fact that BB is looking to partner with Apple gives me hope -- hope that there is a new Apple TV on the horizon! The current unit is nearly perfect, it just needs more storage and a faster processor (as it currently will only play 720p content if its in h.264, there's no support for 1080, and can only playback non-h.264 content at 480p - and then only after a hack).
post #16 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenaustus View Post

We used to have TiVo and then found it cheaper to add the digital recorder from the cable company - they even come out to the house and replace it if there is a problem. The TiVo was taken to Goodwill.

Actually i didn't know TiVo was doing well enough to be a major player these days.

I suspect there are more people using their provider's DVRs than TiVos. However, I know plenty of people who are willing to pay for TiVo because of its added functionality and stability. I only pay for basic-basic cable (the lower 30 channels) and haven't used their boxes, but my understanding was that as soon as Comcast 'upgraded' to the so-called 'Microsoft Enhanced' software, people's boxes were constantly wiping out their recorded content (as if that's a surprise). I hear they've fixed that problem (by removing the Microsoft software), but that they still don't get the functionality of a TiVo (i.e. record all episodes of 'this' show regardless of what channel it shows on, recommend some other shows for me, show me upcoming shows staring 'this' actor, etc).
post #17 of 58
I can't believe people still pay for movies.
post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotmarkb View Post

I can't believe people still pay for movies.

I have no problem supporting creative entertainment.


Hopefully BB does come to the AppleTv.
post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenaustus View Post

TiVo? We used to have TiVo and then found it cheaper to add the digital recorder from the cable company - they even come out to the house and replace it if there is a problem. The TiVo was taken to Goodwill. Actually i didn't know TiVo was doing well enough to be a major player these days.

They're doing well enough that I ordered one last night. No other DVR comes even close to the TiVo in terms of usability and "it just works" simplicity. I've been waiting year after year for Apple to add DVR to AppleTV and last night the wait ended. Apple lost. As for the "cable company" DVR, I'm glad you're happy with yours, but there are legions of people posting online who are not. So TiVo it is and TiVo it remains.
post #20 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotmarkb View Post

I can't believe people still pay for movies.

Well, you see, it is like this....
To make a moderately budgeted independent movie easily costs two or three million dollars. usually there is a marketing budget that comes on top of that. Somewhere in the region of 100 people are directly involved in making the movie (getting their hands dirty?) and these people are grown ups who often times have children they have to feed and so need to get paid for their work. Even most of the young people that work on a movie have their own apartments and need to pay for things like food and rent. Making a movie can take anything from three months to several years to make. When people pay to see movies they are funding all of the above. The reason the studios are so protective of their movie 'properties' is that if people don't pay, they can't make movies and if they don't make movies they, and all the people working on the movies don't have jobs.
See? So next time your mom or dad takes you to see a flick, watch them. While you are running around being a nuisance they probably go to a window in the wall and pay. Ditto if you go with them to the video store.
post #21 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

They're doing well enough that I ordered one last night. No other DVR comes even close to the TiVo in terms of usability and "it just works" simplicity. I've been waiting year after year for Apple to add DVR to AppleTV and last night the wait ended. Apple lost. As for the "cable company" DVR, I'm glad you're happy with yours, but there are legions of people posting online who are not. So TiVo it is and TiVo it remains.

When are we going to get a DVR that doesn't require a monthly subscription? TiVo is dying because for the same subscription price you can get DVR from your cable company and you don't have to hook up another box and keep track of another remote.
post #22 of 58
Blockbuster has to make some sort of move. In the current DVD rental market, the value that BB brings to the table is their willingness to purchase studio copies of the DVD and lease retail locations to deliver the video.

Slowly, this is going away courtesy of other services that are more convenient and competitive.

There would be no need for BB if iTunes had all of these movies, Apple would want to deal direct with the studios, as no physical copy is required, thus no reason for BB to exist.
post #23 of 58
Thats right Blockbuster...give into the best hardware software combo. I wouldn't be surprised if by then Apple doesn't even need to consider saying yes.
post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

Don't fret friend. I was just talking about movie going from theater to home last night. Ten years ago, I predicted who ever got the compression right will win. Well we're not there yet but someday DVDs will be gone as so will dvrs. All content will be on the tv via flash hard drives. All tvs will have tera bytes of storage. As screens get bigger and light pipe more common, we"ll even see movies direct to homes. Even the theaters may be in trouble, butfor now are safe. We're almost there. Specefic dvrs will be gone in five years and you will only need a common tv as they will all include recording as manufactures will be tied to delivery content providers. Don't be surprised if Apple makes the first device.

It's more of a licensing issue than an IT issue. The only thing stopping Apple, Tivo, Netflix, etc., from having every movie ever made available on demand for $3.99 right now is that the distributors are not yet ready to go that far.
post #25 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

See? So next time your mom or dad takes you to see a flick, watch them. While you are running around being a nuisance they probably go to a window in the wall and pay. Ditto if you go with them to the video store.

Maybe, but people usually get their values and ethics from their parents and hotmarkb presumably learned that stealing is cool by example.

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post #26 of 58
Hmm... Will Apple want to allow content from other distributers in their store and/or on their devices? The AppleTV is an extension of iTunes to the living room. Will they see it as the beginning of the end of the iTunes Store model? How will this affect them financially? What long term benefit will they gain by partnering with Netflix and Blockbuster? If the content providers have inked deals with the others then wouldn't it mean they are no longer as fearful about digital sold media, making it easier for Apple to ink their own deal? Would it not be easier for Apple to buy one or the other out instead of being under their rule?


Quote:
Originally Posted by troehl View Post

However, it would be a much bigger story if this is a hint that Apple is preparing to release a SDK for the Apple TV like they have for the iPhone which will allow 3rd-parties to run applications on the Apple TV. Now that would really be news!

I'm not seeing how an SDK for the AppleTV would be very beneficial. What percentage of people would actually buy apps for the device to use with a tiny remote? If you suggest a keyboard and mouse setup doesn't that defeat the purpose of the device and bring the apps to an even smaller crowd. Perhaps I just can't see it but media extenders are such a nascent market and are currently meant to just network your computer and internet media with your TV. Perhaps in the future when the market has become commonplace.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

I wouldn't put it past Apple to open up AppleTV to blockbuster and others (netflix?). If Apple took 30% of all purchases, they could make a killing off of others' subscription models/rentals. They might have to concede since the movie industry is holding them back (their selections are pathetic). Blockbuster and Netflix would greatly add to their library.

I don't think Apple's iTunes movie section is getting close to the percentage they are getting from the music studios. I think that was part of the delay. I can't see them partnering with another middleman like Netflix or Blockbuster which will get them even less money and make the iTunes umbrella less important to the consumer. good for us, bad for them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

The whole online video rental 'thing' is obviously in its infancy and at the moment it is completely fragmented and to be honest, stupid. The fact that not all video content is rentable and viewable by anybody, no matter what hardware they have is not only lame but old fashioned, counter productive and consumer un-friendly. For any company - Apple included - to impose artificial hardware barriers is wrong wrong wrong. I should be able to rent a movie from any source and view it through my Apple TV, Tivo box, or whatever hardware I have. I used to go to BB and get a DVD and pop it into any player, PC or dedicated, and watch the content I had rented. I REALLY resent being tied to a specific hardware solution.

It's fragmented because it is in its infancy, not in spite of. This is commonplace but we'll be seeing the standards emerge shortly.

You mention artificial HW limitations but the issue for most content is not HW but the codecs and digital rights. This is a complex issue and not one that is the fault of anyone but the content owners.


Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post

How many TiVos are in the wild, vs Apple TVs?

This is what I want to know, too.


Quote:
However, the fact that BB is looking to partner with Apple gives me hope -- hope that there is a new Apple TV on the horizon! The current unit is nearly perfect, it just needs more storage and a faster processor (as it currently will only play 720p content if its in h.264, there's no support for 1080, and can only playback non-h.264 content at 480p - and then only after a hack).

I think the rumours of the Apple product with Intel Atom and Nvidia Ion have to be a new AppleTV, if it's true. According to AnandTech this setup will not be able to play 1080p Blu-ray discs but will be able to just barely play 1080p H.264 from a HDD. The higher the profile the more issues it will have. Since Apple doesn't liek to fill out a spec sheet just to win soem geek award I would doubt that 1080p would be allowable on the next AppleTV, if that info is true. BTW, there is support for 1080i on the current device. The reason for not supporting some of the other better codecs is due to legal issues, but I don't if that explains all the reasons. At least updating your AppleTV with Perian is a simple process and I can play 720p content in AVIs just fine.

The more storage thing I don't understand. It has more storage than all the other media extenders before it. Popcorn Hour is a large box of nothing with a place to put any size 3.5" HDD you wish, so it would win there, but it can't push video as well with it's cheaper HW. For a home that doesn't use iTunes or a home with a lot of AVIs I'd recommend Popcorn Hour.]
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post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Maybe, but people usually get their values and ethics from their parents and hotmarkb presumably learned that stealing is cool by example.

Thank you Dr. Phil.
post #28 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

BTW, there is support for 1080i on the current device.

True, it outputs 1080i, but only supports 720p content (presumably there's some upscaling going on? Not sure, as my 720p TV supports 1080i as an input, but obviously has to downscale).

Quote:
The reason for not supporting some of the other better codecs is due to legal issues, but I don't if that explains all the reasons.

You think? I assumed it was because, as already has been discussed, Apple intended the device to be little more than an iTunes media extender (which it does incredibly well, in my opinion), and that is why it has hardware decoding only for h.264.

Quote:
At least updating your AppleTV with Perian is a simple process and I can play 720p content in AVIs just fine.

Does it??? I have the ATV Flash hack (love it, although I primarily use it for Boxee and rarely for couchsurfing and Jaman), and it plays 480p content fine. I haven't tried anything higher because I've read oogles of reports online of people trying to use 720p mkv files and having their AppleTVs either stutter heavily, or simply reboot themselves trying. I've just started running the 720p mkv files I've got through VisualHub and converting to h.264 so that I can view them through the native ATV interface. Unfortunately my first experience had a bit of audio sync troubles, so I'll be using Handbrake for my next attempt.

But, you say you're able to view 720p content via Perian??? I'd love to skip the time (and loss of quality) involved with transcoding if I can.

Quote:
The more storage thing I don't understand. It has more storage than all the other media extenders before it. Popcorn Hour is a large box of nothing with a place to put any size 3.5" HDD you wish, so it would win there, but it can't push video as well with it's cheaper HW. For a home that doesn't use iTunes or a home with a lot of AVIs I'd recommend Popcorn Hour.]

I'd love to hold a library of SD and HD content online and move my DVDs and HD-DVDs into storage elsewhere. SD content streams just fine from my Mini upstairs (which would solve the storage problem), but I find HD streaming to be hit-or-miss. I think if I upgrade to the new Airport Extreme (which allows full N-speeds even if you have legacy devices on the network), this may solve my problem.

I've heard fantastic things from a friend who's got the original version of the Popcorn Hour, and that's a very tempting device - except I have no wired ethernet connection where I'd be plugging it in (although I've read that the new device supports USB Wireless devices). He tells me it hasn't choked on a single video format he's thrown at it.

I'd prefer to have a single device that does it all, however, and I do buy plenty of TV shows through iTunes and want to keep my Apple TV. If it (or a new incarnation) can do the HD content (other than that from iTunes), it will be the perfect device for me!
post #29 of 58
I have to say, I didn't even know BlockBuster was still around. I thought they had gone out of business like so many other companies that forgot they actually needed their customers. I can't imagine why I would want to do business with them.
post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotmarkb View Post

I can't believe people still pay for movies.

Yeah! After all, why should the movie studios get paid for their work you enjoy?
The actors and film crews should all donate their time so you have something to watch.
Oh, and all the equipment manufacturers (lights, cameras, film, computers, sets) should also donate everything so you don't have to pay.
post #31 of 58
Blockbuster isn't just a "weathered brand", they have failed to provide a business model that makes sense. They will eventually need to shutter their doors and replace their stores with DVD rental/digital download kiosks and other innovative ideas in the future if they plan to survive.

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post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Yeah! After all, why should the movie studios get paid for their work you enjoy?
The actors and film crews should all donate their time so you have something to watch.
Oh, and all the equipment manufacturers (lights, cameras, film, computers, sets) should also donate everything so you don't have to pay.

I'm with you on that one. Filmmakers take terrible risks in creating a film without dirtbags uploading their product to the Net for free downloading. Track them down and slap offenders with huge fines, and that includes the industry insiders who do this.

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post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In the latest move to rejuvenate its weathered brand, Blockbuster plans to make its premium digital movie catalog available to TiVo subscribers before ultimately extending the service to devices made by Apple and other hardware vendors.

I'd like to see Tivo partner with Apple, not Blockbuster. The Tivo interface SUCKS, but it's the best out there. Apple would do much better... sigh.
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post

I've just started running the 720p mkv files I've got through VisualHub and converting to h.264 so that I can view them through the native ATV interface. Unfortunately my first experience had a bit of audio sync troubles, so I'll be using Handbrake for my next attempt.

But, you say you're able to view 720p content via Perian??? I'd love to skip the time (and loss of quality) involved with transcoding if I can.

I've had so much trouble with high-bitrate 720p x.264 in the MKV containers that I don't even bother with them. I got choppiness with my old 2.0GHz MacBook with 4GB RAM using the Intel 950 IGP. The IGP was the issue so I'm sure it wouldn't work well on the AppleTV. Perhaps if the next one goes with Nvidia Ion it'll work. High-bitrate media with a CPU heavy encoding are not for weal machines.
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post #35 of 58
The Perian devs have dropped supporting the ATV, because Apple did so many things to hinder what they were doing.. So I would do my videos with that in mind.
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post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenaustus View Post

TiVo?

We used to have TiVo and then found it cheaper to add the digital recorder from the cable company - they even come out to the house and replace it if there is a problem. The TiVo was taken to Goodwill.

Actually i didn't know TiVo was doing well enough to be a major player these days.

And how is that cable box dvr? The reason the cable company comes out to the house to replace them is because they are terrible. The software is pathetic and they crash often. The recording size is limited, their software typically restricts you to component video only, and they sometimes fail to record a show that you requested. My sister's cable box is so bad it claims there is a conflict when she tries to record an HD channel, and the reported conflicted show is not even on the same day or time! The cable company cannot figure out the problem.

The TiVo Series 3 and HD DVR's blow away any cable box. I can transfer shows between both my TiVo DVR's, transfer shows to my Mac for archiving or conversion to iPhone/iPod, display photos from my Mac, listen to music (still limited to MP3's), access NetFlix, Amazon, and many other broadband features. Appears I may be able to do Blockbuster too in the near future. I can also program TiVo to record a show up to an hour before broadcast through the internet or my iPhone. Too bad the cable companies won't allow you to do alll that.
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by troehl View Post

When are we going to get a DVR that doesn't require a monthly subscription? TiVo is dying because for the same subscription price you can get DVR from your cable company and you don't have to hook up another box and keep track of another remote.

Yet the cable company charges you a monthly fee for a box that rarely works well. I don't have to hook up another box because my TiVo Series 3 and HD DVR's replaced my cable box. So I don't need another remote. You are thinking of the outdated Series 2 boxes, and only if you wanted to record premium channels, required the use of the cable box in combination with the Series 2 box.
post #38 of 58
I read today that TiVo currently has 3 million subscribers, which is a declining number. I'd say that may be part of the reason this deal is being done now...2 struggling companies seeing strength in cooperation. Apple/Jobs has made it very clear that this sector remains too undefined and complicated for it, but the rumors and code hints seem to indicate a near future product that moves beyond the current Apple TV offering.

Whether it's the economy driving up these type of video purchases, a mind shift in studio policies, or just another damn good idea like Apple had with the iPod/iPhone for its category, it seems something will be here soon because Apple feels it's ready to move to the next level.
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by wealthychef View Post

I'd like to see Tivo partner with Apple, not Blockbuster. The Tivo interface SUCKS, but it's the best out there. Apple would do much better... sigh.

TiVo is not seeking a partnership with Blockbuster, it is the other way around. How can the TiVo interface suck, if you also claim it is the best out there? The TiVo interface is the best out there because it is very clean and easy to use. It is not messy, confusing and over saturated with colors like those cable box DVR's.

Apple has no interest because that would interfere with the iTunes Store. Apple wants you to buy your TV shows and Movies instead of record them off cable or satellite, which you are already paying for in the first place.
post #40 of 58
A Blockbuster App for the iPhone- big deal.
AppleTV will remain a iTunes Jukebox.
Yawn.
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