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iPhone found ready for enterprise, better than BlackBerry - Page 6

post #201 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Settings>General>Erase all content and settings.

Plug into iTunes > restore does the same thing BUT as you left all your emails on the server the legal requirements are fulfilled.

I know matt_s is going to state that your solution isn't ideal, and he's right, but it's a solution to freeing up 5GB. But wouldn't be better to delete the mail account and then re-add it, so you get to keep all your iPhone settings?
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post #202 of 273
Yes, thanks for posting another solution.

All these people post supposed "problems" as if it is impossible to deal with them, whereas quite often there are workarounds, maybe not perfect but they get the job done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I know matt_s is going to state that your solution isn't ideal, and he's right, but it's a solution to freeing up 5GB. But wouldn't be better to delete the mail account and then re-add it, so you get to keep all your iPhone settings?
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post #203 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Settings>General>Erase all content and settings.

Plug into iTunes > restore does the same thing BUT as you left all your emails on the server the legal requirements are fulfilled.

Thanks for the suggestion, I appreciate your assistance. I've looked into this in detail already (page 109).

The problem here is that this command erases all content. The Blackberry Delete Prior command should be emulated here. Pick a date & delete everything previous to that date... very handy! What if you want to erase all old email except those received during the past 2 days? That's pretty typical business travel behavior.

This is more of a workaround than a solution. There should be a true path for this function, a real feature set.

iPhone is a great instrument, it's why I use it. But it's still very young and needs quite a bit of polishing.
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post #204 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt_s View Post

Thanks for the suggestion, I appreciate your assistance. I've looked into this in detail already (page 109).

The problem here is that this command erases all content. The Blackberry Delete Prior command should be emulated here. Pick a date & delete everything previous to that date... very handy! What if you want to erase all old email except those received during the past 2 days? That's pretty typical business travel behavior.

This is more of a workaround than a solution. There should be a true path for this function, a real feature set.

iPhone is a great instrument, it's why I use it. But it's still very young and needs quite a bit of polishing.

Have you posted this suggestion to Apple or just on forums?
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post #205 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Have you posted this suggestion to Apple or just on forums?

I have sent to Apple & posted on the iPhone Dev forums.

I wish an enterprising developer would write an app called "Delete Prior Email."
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post #206 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

"Oh, I do not have as much money, I better go buy an iPhone instead of that Nokia I always wanted".

Truly speaking, Apple aren't chicken. Marketing is their virtue. iPhone sales prove that. They (contracted carriers) gave it out for 79 eur, when it was necessary. There is huge crowd of iPhone users here in Europe.
No, the choice is not that evident at all, if it comes to Nokia's phones vs. iPhone at 79 eur.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #207 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Truly speaking, Apple aren't chicken. Marketing is their virtue. iPhone sales prove that. They (contracted carriers) gave it out for 79 eur, when it was necessary. There is huge crowd of iPhone users here in Europe.
No, the choice is not that evident at all, if it comes to Nokia's phones vs. iPhone at 79 eur.

No comment:

http://www.symbian-freak.com/news/00...ayer_in_uk.htm
post #208 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

No comment:

http://www.symbian-freak.com/news/00...ayer_in_uk.htm

No comment
http://www.mobileburn.com/news.jsp?Id=6841

C.
post #209 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

No comment:

http://www.symbian-freak.com/news/00...ayer_in_uk.htm

Now after noticed unclear statement about "13 millions" I'm not moved to trust easily what that site reports.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #210 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

No comment:

http://www.symbian-freak.com/news/00...ayer_in_uk.htm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

No comment
http://www.mobileburn.com/news.jsp?Id=6841

C.

For no comments you sure are posting a lot of comments.

PS: No comment.
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post #211 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

No comment
http://www.mobileburn.com/news.jsp?Id=6841

C.

Old news. Try looking back a few days before posting the past.....
post #212 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Now after noticed unclear statement about "13 millions" I'm not moved to trust easily what that site reports.

Generally I look past them and go to their sources and use (In the words of Bush) The Google to try and get more info if possible.
post #213 of 273
...by competing with themselves.

One reason Nokia are losing sales is their bizarre determination to compete with themselves. The N96 was barely out of the womb, when some idiot pre-announced the N97.

What

were

they

thinking?

They effectively killed-off the N96 in order to pre-announce another handset that was more than six months away from shipping.

C.
post #214 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Generally I look past them and go to their sources and use (In the words of Bush) The Google to try and get more info if possible.

I'd prefer Gartner. They say Nokia's champion, too. But nobody knows what's going on with 5800. It sells, surely, that's obvious, but local observations don't reveal it beats iPhone...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #215 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

...by competing with themselves.

One reason Nokia are losing sales is their bizarre determination to compete with themselves. The N96 was barely out of the womb, when some idiot pre-announced the N97.

What

were

they

thinking?

They effectively killed-off the N96 in order to pre-announce another handset that was more than six months away from shipping.

C.

Uber true. The N96 should have never left the drawing board. It was a year too late at best.
post #216 of 273
Bragging that Nokia sold the most music devices in the UK is a bit of a hollow victory now that we know Apple sold 14.8 million iPod/iPhones worldwide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

No comment:

http://www.symbian-freak.com/news/00...ayer_in_uk.htm
post #217 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Bragging that Nokia sold the most music devices in the UK is a bit of a hollow victory now that we know Apple sold 14.8 million iPod/iPhones worldwide.

You waited 2 days to respond to this? Do you have some sort of alert when I post so that you can troll me down and post behind something that I post? In the scheme of things it really has to suck being you. I remember the days when TBaggins used to pop in just set you straight. Those were the days.

Anyway with regard to Nokia being the #1 seller in the UK for their phone it obviously proves that not everyone (as I have said all along) is dying to have an iPhone. These same people that made Nokia #1 could have easily purchased an iPhone and they didn't. The same trend will continue. Apple will gain and lose market share as will Nokia, and the rest, but in the end the current market positions will stay the same. Nokia on top, with the other guys (most likely LG or Samsung) next and Apple pulling in a strong third.

P.S. I see you didn't bother to comment on this so called ban that you mentioned. Did you check it out or is this just another case of you talking about something you know very little?

Stop annoying me and maybe a change of residence (living in Steve Jobs pants) is order.
post #218 of 273
While there's no reason to expect that Apple will be number one in smartphones (I wish I didn't have to keep mentioning smartphones when I talk about numbers, but if I don't, someone will think I mean in ALL phones), it's possible. But I'm not so certain that Nokia will maintain their number one position either, though that's also possible.

It's possible that RIM will take over the number one spot with Nokia second, and Apple third. Or perhaps, RIM will be number one, Apple number two, and Nokia third.

We won't know how this will play out for at least another year or so, and even then, it will likely change sometime after.
post #219 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

While there's no reason to expect that Apple will be number one in smartphones (I wish I didn't have to keep mentioning smartphones when I talk about numbers, but if I don't, someone will think I mean in ALL phones), it's possible. But I'm not so certain that Nokia will maintain their number one position either, though that's also possible.

It's possible that RIM will take over the number one spot with Nokia second, and Apple third. Or perhaps, RIM will be number one, Apple number two, and Nokia third.

We won't know how this will play out for at least another year or so, and even then, it will likely change sometime after.

Hi Melgross,

You might have a point, but when I speak I am speaking in general about global markets, not US. I do not see RIM as being globally ahead of Nokia but I do believe that golbally Apple could have a good shot at being #2. Samsung and LG have some nice phones out. Luckily I get to play with many of them or I can even go to a shop and see them first hand. I would say that Nokia's competition comes from them rather than Apple. Either way, Apple will be releasing something very soon as will Nokia with the N97 (the 5800XM was to software tuning for the N97), and LG, as well as Samsung. I think at this stage of the game we can count SE and Motorola out. However there is Android. Things might shape up nicely for consumers. Either way, I am quite sure I will have a new iPhone as well as a new Nokia.
post #220 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Hi Melgross,

You might have a point, but when I speak I am speaking in general about global markets, not US. I do not see RIM as being globally ahead of Nokia but I do believe that golbally Apple could have a good shot at being #2. Samsung and LG have some nice phones out. Luckily I get to play with many of them or I can even go to a shop and see them first hand. I would say that Nokia's competition comes from them rather than Apple. Either way, Apple will be releasing something very soon as will Nokia with the N97 (the 5800XM was to software tuning for the N97), and LG, as well as Samsung. I think at this stage of the game we can count SE and Motorola out. However there is Android. Things might shape up nicely for consumers. Either way, I am quite sure I will have a new iPhone as well as a new Nokia.

Actually, since I wrote that, I read this:

http://www.thestreet.com/_yahoo/stor...e-day-rim.html
post #221 of 273
Heh!

Another thing I just read:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2345788,00.asp

They just keep coming!

You know how it is when you've read an article but can't find it again even after you've bookmarked it? Well, this time I'm finding articles for our little discussion though I wasn't even looking for them!

So who knows, it might be Apple and Nokia after all!
post #222 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Heh!

Another thing I just read:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2345788,00.asp

They just keep coming!

You know how it is when you've read an article but can't find it again even after you've bookmarked it? Well, this time I'm finding articles for our little discussion though I wasn't even looking for them!

So who knows, it might be Apple and Nokia after all!

I hear you. Like I said, either way I am covered. I will always have a Mac, and an iPhone/Nokia telephony combination. Right now, I use my E71 as my music player simply for the A2DP and my Stereo BT headset, and I use the iPhone as my backup (work) phone. I don't really use it for anything other than to call. If it had more of the features that I wanted/need I might use it more.
post #223 of 273
Outside of random internet fans, or people casting about for an expedient "why Apple must fail" argument, I don't really hear anything good about Android.

It certainly hasn't gotten any particular buzz. As the article you linked to mentions, 6 months on and there are a grand total of two phones. A few rumors of netbooks. A little upbeat talk about "cupcake", which adds some features without appearing to do anything terribly persuasive.

Part of the problem seems to be that Google isn't really pushing it very hard, but I think part of the problem goes to why Apple's vertically integrated model works-- "customizable" and "open source" sound good on paper, but when you release it into the wild, nobody's driving the train.

Without a great deal of intense focus on hardware/software integration, ongoing development, a long term plan beyond "if we build it, they will come" and a narrative that's clear to both consumers and developers, it's really hard to create a product that breaks through the crowd to distinguish itself as more than another "me too" touch phone.

The only ads I've seen seem to be saying that, since an Android handset has a browser, you can Google stuff and find out shit-- as if that were a still a selling point.

I agree with the conclusion of the article-- unless Google shrugs off the sense of drift that has set in and does something fairly splashy by the fall, Android will very much be the desktop Linux of handsets-- doomed to haunt the margins while being championed by that last people in the world you want acting as spokespeople for your products.
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post #224 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Outside of random internet fans, or people casting about for an expedient "why Apple must fail" argument, I don't really hear anything good about Android.

It certainly hasn't gotten any particular buzz. As the article you linked to mentions, 6 months on and there are a grand total of two phones. A few rumors of netbooks. A little upbeat talk about "cupcake", which adds some features without appearing to do anything terribly persuasive.

Part of the problem seems to be that Google isn't really pushing it very hard, but I think part of the problem goes to why Apple's vertically integrated model works-- "customizable" and "open source" sound good on paper, but when you release it into the wild, nobody's driving the train.

Without a great deal of intense focus on hardware/software integration, ongoing development, a long term plan beyond "if we build it, they will come" and a narrative that's clear to both consumers and developers, it's really hard to create a product that breaks through the crowd to distinguish itself as more than another "me too" touch phone.

The only ads I've seen seem to be saying that, since an Android handset has a browser, you can Google stuff and find out shit-- as if that were a still a selling point.

I agree with the conclusion of the article-- unless Google shrugs off the sense of drift that has set in and does something fairly splashy by the fall, Android will very much be the desktop Linux of handsets-- doomed to haunt the margins while being championed by that last people in the world you want acting as spokespeople for your products.

Absolutely.

There's been a lot of buzz in the press. But, I keep hearing about new handsets and they don't arrive. This netbook thing is doomed to fail unless they can get some software for it, and fast. It's why Linux netbooks have been failing. No one who wants a netbook is going to want Linux on it other than Linux Loonies (I should copyright that, but I never get around to it!).

The thing about Apple's prducts is that they keep on ticking. After someone buys a newer one, they sell the old one. Most of the iPhones that have ever been sold are still working somewhere. What other phones can we say that about?

That's something that people have to keep in mind, because it serves the software and accessory markets well. At least 37 million (as of the end of March, over two weeks ago, likely 38 million by now) iPhone/iTouches have been sold, and likely, most of them are still in service.

Think of that market compared to any other companies market. And with each of those devices able to run almost every program and accessory offered today, how can any other company hope to catch up?

The problem with Rim's store for example, is that only later model phones can use it. That makes it a much smaller population.

WinMobile has a big population, but its not likely that most of the Win Mobile phones are still being used, and even if many are, they can't use much of the latest software, and few accessories are available.

Palm is dying quickly, and if the Pre doesn't make it, I've seen estimates that say that Palm won't last the year.

Android, as we see isn't doing well yet with only T-Mobile in the game. So far, not many programs, no real accessories either.

Nokia is in a state of disarray right now. They have no real direction. Like RIM's new models, Nokia is scattershooting all over the place, with no plan in mind. Just come out with very different models and see what sells.

The problem with all these other companies is that without a plan going forwards, they can't build up a platform. Apple is showing everyone that a platform is what's needed.

By keeping the phones and iTouch on a single body plan, they've simplified everything for the accessory and software makers. This gives those companies a much bigger market to target.

With RIM, the Storm and Bold are so different that they are two separate markets. Same thing for Nokia with the 5800 and the N97.

Without a coherent vision, they may sell a lot of phones, but they will fall far behind in usability as Apple keeps adding features and performance while keeping the OS upgrades compatible.

OS 3.0 will add major new features on the software and hardware end that no one can match in overall depth of usefulness.
post #225 of 273
It's as if, back in the earlier days of desktop computing, most of the players had competed by bringing out lots of different form factors that ran different operating systems, or wrote software that would only run on a small subset of their hardware, and they did this quickly, adopting and abandoning input methods or keyboard layouts like network TV programmers on a Red Bull jag.

So that one model might come with a mouse instead of touchpad, but you had to make sure to buy the software for that particular model, only to discover that that particular approach had fallen out of favor so that that kind of software wasn't really being written anymore.

And they called that dismal state of affairs "choice" and believed it made their market "vibrant" because they could "react quickly" to what they imagined the consumer wanted.

And the whole thing was built on a disposable attitude toward design, where one thing rarely led to another and brief offshoots might generate a cluster, only to be left behind when the next shiny thing caught their attention.

And then someone built a computer, as we understand the term, and the pundits warned that the "fast moving" industry wouldn't be kind to the slow and patient, because hardware came and went like mayflies, and consumers expected and demanded that they be sold a new sack of features every fifteen minutes, never mind such quaint ideas as "usability" or "elegance."

And, shockingly, a lot of the industry is still behaving this way.
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post #226 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

It's as if, back in the earlier days of desktop computing, most of the players had competed by bringing out lots of different form factors that ran different operating systems, or wrote software that would only run on a small subset of their hardware, and they did this quickly, adopting and abandoning input methods or keyboard layouts like network TV programmers on a Red Bull jag.

So that one model might come with a mouse instead of touchpad, but you had to make sure to buy the software for that particular model, only to discover that that particular approach had fallen out of favor so that that kind of software wasn't really being written anymore.

And they called that dismal state of affairs "choice" and believed it made their market "vibrant" because they could "react quickly" to what they imagined the consumer wanted.

And the whole thing was built on a disposable attitude toward design, where one thing rarely led to another and brief offshoots might generate a cluster, only to be left behind when the next shiny thing caught their attention.

And then someone built a computer, as we understand the term, and the pundits warned that the "fast moving" industry wouldn't be kind to the slow and patient, because hardware came and went like mayflies, and consumers expected and demanded that they be sold a new sack of features every fifteen minutes, never mind such quaint ideas as "usability" or "elegance."

And, shockingly, a lot of the industry is still behaving this way.

I don't think they know any better. Also, they're so used to being told by the carriers which ones of their features will be allowed to work, that they stick every crappy feature in so that they'll have a good chance of having some functioning.

Apple shows time and again, that it's not features per se that sells, but in how you get those features to work. If it looks easy to use, then it is. If it doesn't look easy, even if it is, it isn't. Perception plays such an important role in the way we evaluate things. And that varies country to country, and culture to culture.

An example from my old industry I still keep up with as a hobbyist these days.

Americans like big volume knobs on their amps. So the Japanese make amps with big volume controls for the American market, their biggest.

But the Japanese like small volume knobs on their amps.

We think that volume is the most important control on an amp, while they think it's one of the least important.

Go figure.

Some companies manage to make the volume control seem big here, but small there. It's a matter of the design. It can be done.

Apple is doing this. But many other makers aren't. They still make phones detailed for one market, and sell it only there.

That's another reason why selling a lot of phones doesn't mean that that company is successful in its markets overall. It makes it almost impossible for developers to get a handle on anything.

Apple has simplified that as IBM and MS did in 1981 with the original PC.
post #227 of 273
Hey Melgross,

Good post, and I will agree with you for about 90% regarding Nokia. It seems now that they are seeing the light (albeit maybe a bit too late) about what people want. As Nokia is not really competing or competitive in the US, I think it would be fair to say that most of your info comes from press releases, and some forums. However, being that I am currently here in Finland, and have access to Nokia (developers, staff, biz teams, etc...), I can see things maybe a bit better than you as I am on the ground. Nokia is following Apple lead and trying to offer sofware and services that are tightly integrated so as to make the user experience more natural. Will they succeed? Who knows but hopefully Apple will push them to make better products and vise versa.
post #228 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Hey Melgross,

Good post, and I will agree with you for about 90% regarding Nokia. It seems now that they are seeing the light (albeit maybe a bit too late) about what people want. As Nokia is not really competing or competitive in the US, I think it would be fair to say that most of your info comes from press releases, and some forums. However, being that I am currently here in Finland, and have access to Nokia (developers, staff, biz teams, etc...), I can see things maybe a bit better than you as I am on the ground. Nokia is following Apple lead and trying to offer sofware and services that are tightly integrated so as to make the user experience more natural. Will they succeed? Who knows but hopefully Apple will push them to make better products and vise versa.

I have nothing against Nokia. I wish them well as I do with the other makers. But, truth be told, not only am I an Apple product user from way back, but I also have a hunking big chunk of stock which has been getting bigger, so I would like Apple to succeed.
post #229 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I have nothing against Nokia. I wish them well as I do with the other makers. But, truth be told, not only am I an Apple product user from way back, but I also have a hunking big chunk of stock which has been getting bigger, so I would like Apple to succeed.

I know you have nothing against Nokia. In fact as I stated in one other thread, you are one of the more interesting people in this forum. You have a wide view as opposed to thinking myopically that the world revolves around Apple. Outside of this forum my friends consider me an Apple zealot or fanboy but, truth be told, I am a fan of what works with the least amount of hasslel
post #230 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

I know you have nothing against Nokia. In fact as I stated in one other thread, you are one of the more interesting people in this forum. You have a wide view as opposed to thinking myopically that the world revolves around Apple. Outside of this forum my friends consider me an Apple zealot or fanboy but, truth be told, I am a fan of what works with the least amount of hasslel

Thanks.

I like to use what gives me the least hassle as well, as long as it performs well and doesn't fall apart.
post #231 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's possible that RIM will take over the number one spot with Nokia second, and Apple third. Or perhaps, RIM will be number one, Apple number two, and Nokia third.

RIM's #1? No way.
My stake: 1.Nokia; 2.Apple; 3 or N) RIM? HTC?...; or 1.Apple; 2.Nokia; 3 or N) RIM? HTC?...

Just precision: totally and universally, in all crowds, including "normal" people. In corporate world RIM, sure, has bigger potential, than anybody else.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #232 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Thanks.

I like to use what gives me the least hassle as well, as long as it performs well and doesn't fall apart.

Exactly. For me it is all about performance vs. price. If I have to pay more to get the performance I am looking for, I go this route. I hate to have something and then think about maybe I should have done this or that.

By the way, someone was complaining about the new iPod Shuffle. Just to add my $00.02 to the mix. I first found the device annoying as it did not have any controls and I was forced to use the crappy headphones supplied by Apple. In fact I still am but this actually a pretty cool device and will be even more so once the 3rd party adapters come out. I can use my Shure SE530's and bump right along. So until they come out, the Shuffle will stay in its case unless I break down and want to use it. Considering it was a gift from Apple for the time it took them to get me a new computer, I would say that I am please with it. For sure it will be a game changer in portible music players.
post #233 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

RIM's #1? No way.
My stake: 1.Nokia; 2.Apple; 3 or N) RIM? HTC?...; or 1.Apple; 2.Nokia; 3 or N) RIM? HTC?...

Just precision: totally and universally, in all crowds, including "normal" people. In corporate world RIM, sure, has bigger potential, than anybody else.

Hmmmm..... Interesting prediction. Considering that BB software will run on Nokia phones via a client, RIM will have a hard time here in Europe. On all of the E-Series phones, you can run BB Connect which lets you have the best of both worlds. I think it will finally settle down with numbers like: Nokia 34%, Apple 25%, and the rest that really do not matter much. Now that Apple songs are DRM free, I simply sync my iTunes lib with my Nokia phone and leave the iPhone at home.
post #234 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Considering that BB software will run on Nokia phones via a client, RIM will have a hard time here in Europe.

RIM is strong in corporate crowd. No IT department will allow to run BB s/w on Nokia's phones on top of some mysterious emulators. I do not think that point will impact RIM positions considerably. RIM will stay where they are.
And Nokia, as a supplier to risky and irresponsible "normal people", will sure benefit from that move to some extent, but I do not think either it will be a big bang anyhow...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #235 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

And Nokia, as a supplier to risky and irresponsible "normal people", will sure benefit from that move to some extent, but I do not think either it will be a big bang anyhow...

Not sure what you mean with this. Risky how so?
post #236 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Not sure what you mean with this. Risky how so?

OK, let's say being capable of easy and brave breaking their handsets just for pleasure and adventure

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #237 of 273
You do know that Nokia is releasing it's own email solution starting with the E75, they also took BB off their handsets for a short period then put it back, to use it you need to pay for the BB service.

As far as Nokia offering services go they are dealing with a consumer base used to getting "free" (pirated) software on the "open" Symbian platform.

Will the Ovi store be as much of a failure as the Nokia Music Store.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

Hmmmm..... Interesting prediction. Considering that BB software will run on Nokia phones via a client, RIM will have a hard time here in Europe. On all of the E-Series phones, you can run BB Connect which lets you have the best of both worlds. I think it will finally settle down with numbers like: Nokia 34%, Apple 25%, and the rest that really do not matter much. Now that Apple songs are DRM free, I simply sync my iTunes lib with my Nokia phone and leave the iPhone at home.
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post #238 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

You do know that Nokia is releasing it's own email solution starting with the E75, they also took BB off their handsets for a short period then put it back, to use it you need to pay for the BB service.

As far as Nokia offering services go they are dealing with a consumer base used to getting "free" (pirated) software on the "open" Symbian platform.

Will the Ovi store be as much of a failure as the Nokia Music Store.

1. Yes, yes. The email has been in beta for a while. It launched or will launch very soon, and of course you have to pay to use the BB service. You need licenses just like everything else. If you have a RIM handset, you still have to pay for the service so I am not sure of your point here. Besides throughout the companies that I know of here in Finland, they simply use a VPN solution to get to the company resources, so BB COnnect is not really needed in some cases.

2. What pirated software would that be? For the most part, most if not all software is tied to the IMEI of the phone. Sure you can change them but the software looks for a specific IMEI every time and some applications now push a token to the SIM card so if you change phones but have the same SIM card, you do not need to request a new reg code.

3. I would surely say that the Music Store is not a major hit and now that iTunes is DRM free, people might migrate to an easier pay and download system. I for sure do not use the Music Store.
post #239 of 273
The point of the first part is that Nokia is breaking their ties to BB and will be trying to offer a similar service.

Part 2 Is more regarding Symbian applications in general, I'm sure Nokia has more in mind than just selling BB software through Ovi, any moves to secure their platform will not be greeted warmly by Symbian fans used to having their own way.

Part 3 Nokias music store is a fail, could locking up the "Comes with music" be a taste of things to come e.g. You can't use Nokia music store music as a ringtone or Bluetooth it to your friends, things that the iPhone is criticised for. N-gage is another fail, this could be a result of "free" alternatives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapporobabyrtrns View Post

1. Yes, yes. The email has been in beta for a while. It launched or will launch very soon, and of course you have to pay to use the BB service. You need licenses just like everything else. If you have a RIM handset, you still have to pay for the service so I am not sure of your point here. Besides throughout the companies that I know of here in Finland, they simply use a VPN solution to get to the company resources, so BB COnnect is not really needed in some cases.

2. What pirated software would that be? For the most part, most if not all software is tied to the IMEI of the phone. Sure you can change them but the software looks for a specific IMEI every time and some applications now push a token to the SIM card so if you change phones but have the same SIM card, you do not need to request a new reg code.

3. I would surely say that the Music Store is not a major hit and now that iTunes is DRM free, people might migrate to an easier pay and download system. I for sure do not use the Music Store.
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post #240 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

The point of the first part is that Nokia is breaking their ties to BB and will be trying to offer a similar service.

Part 2 Is more regarding Symbian applications in general, I'm sure Nokia has more in mind than just selling BB software through Ovi, any moves to secure their platform will not be greeted warmly by Symbian fans used to having their own way.

Part 3 Nokias music store is a fail, could locking up the "Comes with music" be a taste of things to come e.g. You can't use Nokia music store music as a ringtone or Bluetooth it to your friends, things that the iPhone is criticised for. N-gage is another fail, this could be a result of "free" alternatives.

1. True. They are offering an email service now. I beta tested it for a while but I did not like it that much. I use ProfiMail (application) and connect to my .me account via IMAP. Works pretty good, and in my opinion is a viable contender against BB or any other mail solution. Also to consider is that when the BB network goes down users are without mail until it comes back up. By using a simple VPN solution, users are not held hostage to BB outages.

2. I am still trying to get which pirated applications you are talking about. How are they pirated when they are tied to an IMEI. For most Symbian applications, you can not simply move them from one phone to the next without requesting a new reg code from the software publisher. So please explain how apps are pirated on Symbian. As an aside, have you ever used a Symbian device?

3. Here you are partially correct in your facts but the context is wrong. You and BT anything from one phone to another. You can't do jack with the iPhone in regards to BT. Why bother to have it really as it is severly crippled by Apple. I can not say about BT'g DRM music from the Nokia store but I know for sure I can BT any song I want from my phone to another. iPhone is a fail in this department and it has no A2DP. Another fail. As I am not a fan of gaming on phones in general unless it is something like Scrabble, or NYT Crossword, or similar, I could not really care less but N-Gage is not failing. They are doing okay and more and more titles are coming out for it.
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