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Snow Leopard to offer screen recording via QuickTime X Player - Page 2

post #41 of 48
This is less, adding features to an application, as it is the next step in video functionality going beyond applications.

QT was and is great and ground breaking, but you can see that video and media are not going to require opening an app, selecting a file and then seeing a fake media player screen sitting on your desktop. Video is going to become as persistent and foundational to the OS as the cursor/pointer.

You will be moving a video window around, not a QT window around. You will manipulate video from your iSight to the screen itself without all the bells and whistles that have traditionally been required. The HUD effects in this new QT and in iPhoto and other apps foreshadow a future intelligent OS that predicts what you need to do with media and gives you the services without having to worry about the last century metaphor of opening an app. That is what the core services are about and what the iPhone and later tablet interfaces will get to. We are just on a step in that direction.

Now, there will always be a place for apps like Photoshop and SnapZ when you have a job and you want to create something beyond the basics, but simple display (QuickView and Coverflow), manipulation (iPhoto HUD) and sharing (email, YouTube, Twitter, etc.) of information and media will all become OS jobs, not traditional application jobs. Recording will just be the latest functionality to this feature set.
The Mother of all flip-flops!!
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The Mother of all flip-flops!!
Support our troops by educating yourself and being a responsible voter. Democracy and Capitalism REQUIRE Intelligence and Wisdom if they are to be worth a damn beyond...
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post #42 of 48
Excellent post, and I completely agree.

Modern hardware is powerful enough for Apple to revisit its OpenDoc ideas, without worrying unduly about the processing overhead.

Interestingly, it seems likely that touch devices will help break the app metaphor and usher in an era of mainstream, file centric computing, since touch manipulation encourages the sense that the file at hand is the "stuff" that you working on directly, rather than the "contents" of a given app.

So you start to watch a video stream, pause with a tap, drag that frame onto the desktop, invoke text entry with a gesture, type a caption on the soft keyboard that popped up, make another gesture to invoke email addressing, and "toss" the captioned frame grab onto the outgoing email icon.

This is where Apple is headed, and I think their technologies put them in a great position to make it happen.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Excellent post, and I completely agree.

Modern hardware is powerful enough for Apple to revisit its OpenDoc ideas, without worrying unduly about the processing overhead.

Interestingly, it seems likely that touch devices will help break the app metaphor and usher in an era of mainstream, file centric computing, since touch manipulation encourages the sense that the file at hand is the "stuff" that you working on directly, rather than the "contents" of a given app.

So you start to watch a video stream, pause with a tap, drag that frame onto the desktop, invoke text entry with a gesture, type a caption on the soft keyboard that popped up, make another gesture to invoke email addressing, and "toss" the captioned frame grab onto the outgoing email icon.

This is where Apple is headed, and I think their technologies put them in a great position to make it happen.

I for my part admit to having been excited by OpenDoc.
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I for my part admit to having been excited by OpenDoc.

Yeah! It was one of those really interesting, forward thinking initiatives that sort of got lost in the shuffle during the dark years.

I mean, there were problems, for sure, but Apple couldn't decide if it wanted to fully commit or just doodle in the margins, and that's no way to drive adoption.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #45 of 48
I will not regret letting Snapz fly off my HD...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #46 of 48
I always hated Snapz, but used it.... but recently I started using Screenium, and its sooo much better than Snapz. Everyone should switch over to Screenium, its even cheaper too.
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yeah! It was one of those really interesting, forward thinking initiatives that sort of got lost in the shuffle during the dark years.

I mean, there were problems, for sure, but Apple couldn't decide if it wanted to fully commit or just doodle in the margins, and that's no way to drive adoption.

I think the issue was that they were waiting for Microsoft to get on board but they failed to realise that Microsoft adopting something that they couldn't control exclusively would have been a no-no.

The only real alternative would have been if they (Apple) provided frameworks for Windows themselves rather than relying on Microsoft to ship it with the operating system itself - but then again, this was before the internet so wide spread deployment would have been difficult.
post #48 of 48
The problem with OpenDoc is it doesn't scale.

The vision was a grand universe where people pick and choose their software from a load of different components: a spellchecker from one company, a text editor from another, some drawing tools from another. The problems are:

1. Companies don't want to deliver their software as bitesized components. It adds value when a product is fully integrated, and making things component based removes that.

2. Writing a good, self contained component, including all its UI, in a way that fits in with a host application and is easy to use... is really difficult.

3. It makes a lot of sense for page layout apps, but all other uses of OpenDoc (including conceptual stuff) doesn't seem appropriate. Things like AudioUnits and Core Image filters already do enough for their respective disciplines.

4. How do you price things? If a user wants to mix and match products from ten companies to make their dream DTP app, those components had better be a tenth of the price. You know it's not going to happen.

5. OpenDoc's native document format was a mess. It was hard to parse, and components could not read each other's files. Therefore, to view a document, you had to have the same set of components installed as its creator.

6. One problem that could be solved now but wasn't then, is the RAM usage. When I first used System 7.5, I had 4MB of RAM. OpenDoc used over half of this.

Amorya
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