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Apple hit with class action suit over fire-prone MagSafe adapters - Page 2

post #41 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julio View Post

We smelled it and looked around the house for 20 minutes before we figured out what was burning. It looked exactly like a picture. She kept it plugged in all the time, and only used it as her home adapter.

Julio

Legally notarized pics or it didn't happen.
post #42 of 107
Same Here. I have been using this adapter since the first laptop it came on. I have 3 now and none of them have given me any trouble over the 2 plus years I have used them. I travel extensively and have never had a problem. I find that simply being careful has kept them in like new condition.

While I'm sure that a small percentage of them may be faulty I doubt it is anywhere near the figures they are claiming. Hell I still have two of the old style laptop adaptors that Apple used and they are fine too.
post #43 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by metsgiantsfan234 View Post

my iphone plug does that also...i tried covering it with tape but its still not great

Work in IT. We have many users that have no issue with this at all, & a few who have major issues. So what's the difference? The users who have the issue %100 of the time also are users who don't take good care of their computers.

I'm not talking about minor bumps mind you, I'm talking people who had a Dell before & completely destroyed it so often we tried getting them a Panasonic ToughBook (which never worked right).

Apple has recommendations on how to wrap their cords. We constantly remind our users of this but they still ignore us & tear the cords up. Our Dell power cords suffer no less, many of them are worse than the Macs.
post #44 of 107
reminds me of that old man who wanted to sue nintendo because he broke his back playing Wii,hmm. My magsafe has been fine since '06,even with little kids and dogs running around and tripping it once in awhile.
post #45 of 107
that cord in the pic they used looks so haggard! i had a cord burn up on me and it had a brownish tint to it around the burn hole. the cord in the pic looks like it has been banged up and pinched in something not a burn. these people are pathetic. i know a lot of people that are on hard times but nobody that would sue a company over a BS claim.
post #46 of 107
After reading some of the posts, I changed my mind and I tend to think that the quality issue either has been resolved or is limited to a few cases.

Hopefully, Apple is providing a great experience to MacBook buyers.


post #47 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Legally notarized pics or it didn't happen.

Unwrap your tin foil hat, its obviously cutting off blood flow
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post #48 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ten View Post

The "magsafe" is not the issue (idiot)... it's that the cable frays... which imho, is something all cables do, especially the used and abused ones.

Don't do personal attacks on other members here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by speed_the_collapse View Post

This happened to me! I've had one MagSafe connector melt while on vacation. Once I got back home, the Apple Store guy would not replace my power supply, telling me it wasn't part of the MacBook's warranty.

Was the guy giving me bull? If not for the AppleCare, what reason would we be allowed to get our power supplies replaced?

More recently, I've had another one crack, but not melt, and it still works. It's now on light-duty and I don't carry it around with me.

That sounds dubious. I would try again. But replace those things at any rate.

I had a power supply replaced under warranty, but it was a different problem, the pins wouldn't push out anymore, I think the springs inside just got brittle and broke.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Legally notarized pics or it didn't happen.

Legally notarized? Just a photo should be fine. Anything higher is way too high of a standard to demand here, this isn't a court or even Night Court. If you don't want the same applied to you when you make claims, you should avoid spouting that at others.
post #49 of 107
As other's have said, I'm betting the problem is that people are unplugging the connector by pulling on the cord. Especially if you try to pull the MagSafe connector straight out. It's a pretty tough magnet. You are sure to pull the wires out of the connector if you do that enough times. The connector disengages more easily of you tilt it, but again, if you do that by pulling on the wire you are stressing the connection between the wire and the connector.

However, there is a design issue in that Apple made the connector too small, making it difficult to remove the connector without stressing the wires. Previous connectors were large enough that you could grasp the connector and pull it out.

I'd also point out that the MagSafe connector shown in the photo in the article appears to have seen some abuse. Look at the connector itself, how chipped up it looks. It looks as if either a cat had been chewing on it or it got sucked into a vacuum a few times.
post #50 of 107
I call BS on the lawsuit. I have two Mag-safe adapters. One is 2yrs old, the other is 1yr old. Zero problems. I also have a 'yo-yo' adapter on a (still working!) Powerbook G3 - we're talking ~7yrs, and no problems. I treat cables with care.

The problems are from bone-head users. You can't treat power cables (or any cable) like crap and expect it to last. I see this all the time, and not just with computers. Have you looked at some people's vacuum cleaners?

For any cable to last and not fray/break/short/etc. you cannot: 1. Wind too tightly. 2. Tie in knots. 3. Bend the connector at sharp right angles (or worse) to 'tuck' it in. 4. Repeatedly bend and/or twist. 5. Yank out the plug or connector by pulling on the cable. 6. Other cable abuses like pets chewing on them. 7. Take environuts too seriously and use materials in cables that are weak. People need to clue in, and think.

Apple could mitigate their exposure to this problem by using a better strain relief on the cable. That little cheap piece of plastic wrapped around the cord at the connector end is mostly useless. They went to this cheaper design on all their cables, presumably to save .05 pennies per cable. Not a good choice if you think about it. A good example is the iPod cables - which used to have a molded, longer, more supportive, and more flexible strain relief, but now they all have the cheap short stubby plastic wrap. Too bad.
post #51 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

As other's have said, I'm betting the problem is that people are unplugging the connector by pulling on the cord. Especially if you try to pull the MagSafe connector straight out. It's a pretty tough magnet. You are sure to pull the wires out of the connector if you do that enough times. The connector disengages more easily of you tilt it, but again, if you do that by pulling on the wire you are stressing the connection between the wire and the connector.

However, there is a design issue in that Apple made the connector too small, making it difficult to remove the connector without stressing the wires. Previous connectors were large enough that you could grasp the connector and pull it out.

Now that I see it explained that way, I can't help but think that wire stress really shouldn't be a problem given that the stated design is to release when given an inadvertent tug.

Quote:
I'd also point out that the MagSafe connector shown in the photo in the article appears to have seen some abuse. Look at the connector itself, how chipped up it looks. It looks as if either a cat had been chewing on it or it got sucked into a vacuum a few times.

Given the magnification, it's not so bad. The edges are so sharp that the plastic is going to nick on occasion. it's hard to tell with the rest of the connector body as it's out of focus beyond the nearest edge.
post #52 of 107
I had a 2 year old Macbook. I didn't even realize anything was wrong with the plug until it started smoking. A small tear in the rubber closest to the mag connector. I covered it up with electrical tape and didn't think twice about it. I was reluctant on shelling out $80 bucks for a new one.
A day later, the electrical tape caught on fire and I had a melted ball of rubber on the end of the connector.
I brought it to the Apple Store and they replaced it with a brand new one free of charge. I was just happy I didn't have to come out the pockets for it.
post #53 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaphodsplanet View Post

I think apple should do this.....

Say..... would you please back up your computer and send it to us.

Then... give them a full refund and keep the computer.... give them a check and a letter that says they have proved that they are entirely TOO STUPID to own a COMPUTER.

Like another person said in here... I've had several power books and ibooks... and the cords were fine so long as you didn't close one in a door... have a pet that chewed on it... or anything like that.

You know.... things that can beat the heck out of a power cord and break it.

These kinds of lawsuits are such total bullshit! 3 idiots find a lawyer that will represent 3 idiots since they have a gripe with Apple.... which should be a gripe for just being freaking STUPID. This is like the guy that sued McDonalds for spilling hot coffee on himself. Or the other guy that said his daughter was so traumatized by not having a prize in a box of Cracker Jacks that he really needed millions of dollars to help her feel better.

This is the wussification of America. We need one of the few things that the UK has that we don't. It's called LOOSER PAYS. The idea being if you start some kind of fraudulent lawsuit against someone, or some company... and you LOOSE (As these morons should) You have to pay the legal bills for their defense.

We can all have accidents with these cords.... I know I have. I closed one in a door next to my desk once... duh... blonde moment on my part. But I didn't go screaming to Apple... YOU MADE A DEFECTIVE CORD....waaaaaa...

Take some personal responsibility folks. These guys are tards trying to take advantage of Apple.... If there was a real problem we would have heard tons of people complaining on here.

Geez..... I'm surprised they didn't have their computer plugged into their cig lighter in the car while they were filling up on a hot day with no breeze....

Then I guess we'd be talking about a Darwin Award.

Z

I agree with some of what you said. I like the loser pays concept. However, I had a power cord for a G4 Powerbook that burned my fingers and made the skin turn white. It had always been wrapped around the two flip out prongs and I believe that from wrapping and unwrapping the adaptor literally hundreds of times that the cord became not only very filthy but mangled and twisted up on the insides. I believe this is what led to my cord's demise.

Mine was not a mag safe but here's the lesson folks... I was smart enough to see what the constant wrapping and unwrapping of my cord did to it so here's three things that I did and anyone else can do these to help prevent this from happening:

1. when I got a Macbook Pro, I bought an extra power adaptor to leave at the office so I didn't have to pack up the adaptor that I have at home.

2. I got a third power adaptor that quite literally stays in my laptop bag all the time and I only take it out if I'm traveling

3. I NEVER use the flip out prongs to wrap up the cord.

4. I learned how roadies / stage hands pack up mic cords and I wrap ALL my cords this way now. It saves them so much wear and tear and prevents them from getting tangled.



I hope that helps.
post #54 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Now that I see it explained that way, I can't help but think that wire stress really shouldn't be a problem given that the stated design is to release when given an inadvertent tug.

A design to release from the occasional inadvertent tug to prevent the laptop from being pulled off the table is one thing. But that does not mean it was designed to be unplugged that way every time the laptop is unplugged. You don't use an emergency relief valve on a pressure vessel to lower the pressure under normal circumstances. You use the proper valve designed for that purpose. Repeated use of a component designed for the occasional emergency is going to eventually lead to failure of the component.

Both parties are at fault. People should know better than to unplug the connector by pulling on the cord. But Apple should have anticipated that people are stupid and lazy, and they should have designed the connector in a way to make it easier to grip the connector without pulling on, or bending, the wire (ie, they should have made the connector longer).
post #55 of 107
IMHO, Apple's cord from the laptop to the adapter has been roughly the same since the yo-yo adapters. Moreover, Apple has had fraying problems ever since they started using smaller gauges and smaller cable jackets. Just look at the reviews in the Apple store. They've been crappy for years.

The smaller gauges and cable jackets are easier to wrap and pack, which is nice. Wrapping a giant thick cable is a pain. However, they don't stand up to abuse as well as something like the power cable for your iron.
post #56 of 107
There's a lot of confusion here, so I'll explain exactly what the problem is it happened to mine just a couple months ago. (It's still under warranty so of course Apple replaced it.)

When the cord is bent too far in any direction near the magsafe plug, the wiring inside get pressed hard against the insulation and heats it up, eventually burning a hole right through it. (I noticed the problem when I touched the cable and it nearly burned me.)

This is not an issue of abuse this can easily happen if your cable bends back behind your computer, as was the case with mine. I had absolutely no reason to think that a minor bend in the cable would be enough to destroy it. It should not do so.

I do believe that this is a problem with the products themselves, not their abuse.
post #57 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

A design to release from the occasional inadvertent tug to prevent the laptop from being pulled off the table is one thing. But that does not mean it was designed to be unplugged that way every time the laptop is unplugged. You don't use an emergency relief valve on a pressure vessel to lower the pressure under normal circumstances. You use the proper valve designed for that purpose. Repeated use of a component designed for the occasional emergency is going to eventually lead to failure of the component.

Both parties are at fault. People should know better than to unplug the connector by pulling on the cord. But Apple should have anticipated that people are stupid and lazy, and they should have designed the connector in a way to make it easier to grip the connector without pulling on, or bending, the wire (ie, they should have made the connector longer).

Eh. As an industrial designer, I don't really think that's an excuse. A LOT of people are going to yank the cord. They shouldn't, but they will. It's convenient and 99.9% of the time the cord will be fine... so people will do it.

As a designer you should design a solution that accounts for how your users will interact, for better or worse, with your product. Look at the cord on an iron. The plug is big and grippy to indicate "I'm supposed to be grabbed," but just in case the user yanks the cord, the cord is thick and reinforced at the plug.

I'm not saying Apple needs to go back to 1999 and bring back the big fat power cord, but they could make some small design tweaks to address this. The connector could have some affordances that speak to "grab" and "pull here" (grippy lines, thumb indentation, etc.) Moreover, the cable could have a discreet rubber shield that stresses the mag safe connector, not the internal wiring.
post #58 of 107
I think pulling on the cord does cause this to happen to some people. Pulling is just something a lot of people do because it seems to make sense. No one thinks about the issue until it hits them hard. It's not as apparent an issue as dealing with the laptop itself. Putting a little warning sticker when ripping the plastic off the MagSafe could definitely go a long way (not to mention push back the lawsuits).

I also noticed the MacBook Air's MagSafe Adapter has a bit of a different design that seems far more cord-pull friendly than the MacBooks and MacBook Pro. That's probably because it was designed that way given how out of the way the connector is supposed to be. I actually kind of like that design better myself and was disappointed Apple didn't adopt it for the unibody MacBooks.
post #59 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by hezekiahb View Post

Work in IT. We have many users that have no issue with this at all, & a few who have major issues. So what's the difference? The users who have the issue %100 of the time also are users who don't take good care of their computers.

I'm not talking about minor bumps mind you, I'm talking people who had a Dell before & completely destroyed it so often we tried getting them a Panasonic ToughBook (which never worked right).

Apple has recommendations on how to wrap their cords. We constantly remind our users of this but they still ignore us & tear the cords up. Our Dell power cords suffer no less, many of them are worse than the Macs.

I also work in IT and we have had a couple of faulty power cords but on inspection it was clear that it was down to the user disconneting the cord by pulling it instead of the magsafe plug. However Apple swapped theseout for new power supplies without any questions. One of our users managed to go through 4 power supplies for his dell and acer laptops but has managed to keep his Apple one pristine after he was showed the correct way to disconnect and store it. The problem with all laptop power supplies is down to careless users. They yank cords out, wrap the cable up to tightly and generally abuse them. This causes the braided conductor to break inside the wire which causes a short (flex the wire and you can hear it crackling) and eventually this will melt/burn the cable.

Also the best way to disconnect a magsafe connector is not to pull it off (that is the direction in which the magnet is strongest) but upwards. You can disconnect it with the flick of a single finger.
post #60 of 107
Is this discussion about the original mag safe adapters when they first came out or the currently shipping ones? The original ones clearly had a design fault where the strain relief at the mag safe end wasn't big enough, causing the cable to fray at that point (though contrary to popular opinion, not because of yanking the cable out but because of constant minor movement back and forth if you use the laptop on your laptop with the cable dangling). The replacement has completely fixed that issue though.
post #61 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

The infamous PowerBook 5300 incident never made it out of the labs! There never was a recall for batteries that were never used in production models.

This isn't true. While the problem never occurred, to the best of my knowledge, outside of the labs, Apple did ship a thousand or so of the machines before they discovered the issue, and those all had to be recalled.
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post #62 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Cheech View Post

These cables are damaged because they are removed by pulling on the cable instead of pulling on the connector.

You nailed it right there. That happened to me with my MB connector about a year ago. They exchanged it at the store and advised to 1) always pull from the mag connector itself and 2) don't leave the MB pulling on the cable for extended lengths of time... Pretty simple stuff I guess, and the replacement cable looks brand new after one year following those points
post #63 of 107
What the hell @ people who think 'it hasn't happened to me, so this is bullshit.'

My cable popped, crackled and melted through while I was editing a project for work. I do not do acrobatics with my MacBook, I do not wrap the cable in stupid ways. It's either on the desk or on my lap, I'm glad I am not the only one this has happened to. I'd be interested to see if this has happened to the some of the Air's MagSafe cables.
post #64 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Legally notarized? Just a photo should be fine. Anything higher is way too high of a standard to demand here, this isn't a court or even Night Court. If you don't want the same applied to you when you make claims, you should avoid spouting that at others.

You're not making any sense.

I don't believe most of these claims. It is anecdotal nonsense that directly counters what has time and time again been stated publicly about Apple by third parties and consumers. And these individuals are also suspect in the way they handle or have handled the cord/adapter/plug.

I wasn't actually asking for admissible pics in the expectation of getting any or in the expectation that the individual could provide them, LOL!! I was making a statement, though a subtle one. And whatever claims I make around here, like those of others, have no legal context and no legal impact on anyone or any organization, unlike the claim made by the individual whom I called out.
post #65 of 107
I've had this problem with Apple portables since a PowerBook 1400. It's power adaptor went in exactly the same place. My 2001 iBook has been through 3 adaptors, both yo-yo and brick style. The white brick also had a problem at the brick end of the cable from winding around the cable prongs.

It comes down to Apple's miniturisation. Compare Apple's charging cables with any other company's, and Apple's are considerably thinner and more flexible (and so more likely to knot).
post #66 of 107
Well, you certainly can't say Apple's legal team hasn't been getting their exercise lately.
post #67 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdasmith View Post

It comes down to Apple's miniturisation. Compare Apple's charging cables with any other company's, and Apple's are considerably thinner and more flexible (and so more likely to knot).

As I said- form over function bites again.
I frankly could care less how thin my cord or connector is- whatever is more efficient works for me. Those recent mini iPod charging cable connectors look like trouble too.
post #68 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strawberry View Post

What the hell @ people who think 'it hasn't happened to me, so this is bullshit.'

My cable popped, crackled and melted through while I was editing a project for work. I do not do acrobatics with my MacBook, I do not wrap the cable in stupid ways. It's either on the desk or on my lap, I'm glad I am not the only one this has happened to. I'd be interested to see if this has happened to the some of the Air's MagSafe cables.

The crackling is caused by the broken conductor wires in the cable, these then short and spark inside the sheath. This is caused by stress on the cable and stretching/bending.

This is not solely an Apple issue, all manufacturers use slimmer wires now and your mileage may vary. Acer seem to be a big culprit and when you complain to them they pretty much tell you to F off. At least Apple replace the units no questions asked.

Just checked the support database. We have had to replace 2 Apple magsafe power supplies since April 2008 (both for free through Apple) out of a total of 38 Macbooks. In the same period of time we had to replace 14 Dell power supplies (we replaced these with 3rd party multi units) out of 63 units. And 19 Acer power supplies out of 56 units (again with 3rd party units) . Acer is no longer on our approved list for portables (or desktops for that matter)

The cable issues seemed to be caused by wrapping them up around the power bricks. We now supply soft velcro straps and get the users to loop the wires now and not wrap them. I thought everyone knew not to wrap wires as even back in the days of the Atari consoles etc you knew that wrapping the cables around the jousticks etc broke them over time.
post #69 of 107
Why does Apple design products that cause fire? LOL

think about it...

the iPhone 3G plug and now this and many other past products.
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post #70 of 107
Looks like they let the hamster near it.
post #71 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

Hmm...looks to me like these folks are trying to create their own "economic stimulus" at Apple's expense.

Wrong. These cables go bad prematurely. Why do people like you always blame the victim instead of the offender?
post #72 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by italiankid View Post

Why does Apple design products that cause fire? LOL

think about it...

the iPhone 3G plug and now this and many other past products.


They don't.

People need to start taking care of their stuff, and a certain select few need to sop lying in forums.
post #73 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua OS X View Post

Eh. As an industrial designer, I don't really think that's an excuse. A LOT of people are going to yank the cord. They shouldn't, but they will. It's convenient and 99.9% of the time the cord will be fine... so people will do it.

As a designer you should design a solution that accounts for how your users will interact, for better or worse, with your product. Look at the cord on an iron. The plug is big and grippy to indicate "I'm supposed to be grabbed," but just in case the user yanks the cord, the cord is thick and reinforced at the plug.

I'm not saying Apple needs to go back to 1999 and bring back the big fat power cord, but they could make some small design tweaks to address this. The connector could have some affordances that speak to "grab" and "pull here" (grippy lines, thumb indentation, etc.) Moreover, the cable could have a discreet rubber shield that stresses the mag safe connector, not the internal wiring.

I agree with what you're saying here totally, but I don't believe that pulling on the cord is the issue for magsafe connectors.

The one thing they (presumably) *are* designed for specifically is detachment by yanking on the cord. It's their entire raison d'etre as it were.

Apple has a history of designing things to rather fine tolerances and their designers place a premium on thin-ness, as well as keeping things to the smallest size possible for their use. I would suspect that the conductors in the wire are the minimum required so as not to overheat with the resistance and the cable packing/sheathing/whatever is as minimal as it can be also.

Given that, all it takes is a strong person with a penchant for winding their cords with more force than the designer expected, and some of the wires inside will eventually break. This could easily leads to overheating, possible additional wires breaking and a snowball effect wherein the wire becomes either dangerously hot or broken or both.

IMO it's the minimalist design coupled with the failure to expect that a giant truck driver might also buy that laptop instead of the usual effete Apple-eque latte drinker that's at fault.

It also struck me as a bad idea that they continue to encourage users to wind their cords around the adapter horns. Being practical and having had it drilled into me since birth not to overly wind cords on electrical equipment I've never had a problem, but given these wire problems started appearing years ago, Apple should probably have started discouraging the practice given that an un-careful "winder" can cause so much damage.
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post #74 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

As a side note if Apple focuses to much on making the environmentalist happy you can expect even more durability problems in the future. Not that I support pollution just that sometimes the environmentalist have ill advised policies.

I understand that this is a "side note," but can you explain what that comment has to do with ANYTHING? It certainly doesn't have anything to do with reality. There is absolutely no reason something can't be environmentally friendly AND durable without a little know-how, and anybody who wants to argue otherwise is just too ignorant or too lazy to make it happen.
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post #75 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

People need to start taking care of their stuff, and a certain select few need to sop lying in forums.

Italiankid is a moron; just don't respond to him. I know; it's hard.
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post #76 of 107
My original larger magsafe (the earlier units for the 17 MBP were bigger) failed after about 6 months just like in the photo in the original article ...melted through and eventually stopped working, I would spark if flexed near the melt. The replacement also a larger one is still going strong but I did have to pay for it and it took 3 weeks to get it. Feeling that maybe it was the repeated wrapping up that caused the problem I purchased a new one that was one of the redesigned versions that is physically smaller. That one failed in a similar fashion but up at where it attached to the white brick. Once more I attempted to get the Apple store to replace it and this time I was successful. That was about a year ago. Both adapters continue to function however I now seldom carry them. I keep one at home and one at the office...only when I know I need more time that the battery will last do I pack one up.
post #77 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

You're not making any sense.

I don't believe most of these claims. It is anecdotal nonsense that directly counters what has time and time again been stated publicly about Apple by third parties and consumers. And these individuals are also suspect in the way they handle or have handled the cord/adapter/plug.

I wasn't actually asking for admissible pics in the expectation of getting any or in the expectation that the individual could provide them, LOL!! I was making a statement, though a subtle one. And whatever claims I make around here, like those of others, have no legal context and no legal impact on anyone or any organization, unlike the claim made by the individual whom I called out.

No, what you're really saying is that you've already made up your mind, closed it and locked it, i.e. nothing could reasonably done to change it. And the person you leveled that against also didn't suggest a legal context either, so it looks like you're just running a case of special pleading.

You're also saying that someone's experience didn't actually happen, as if they're relating some sort of hearsay and not personal experience. Unlike some other people, it wasn't a person that said all the adapters were bad, suggest that it was a widespread problem, or even mention what they thought of the case, just that they had that experience. Seems like you picked the most innocuous post to level that kind of response when there were other people that are suggesting that Apple's products are defective by design.

The final thing you're saying is that you're calling that person a liar without being bold enough to just say that rather than being so roundabout.
post #78 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Blitheness over seriousness once again bites you.

The sad fact is, you don't (perhaps can't) even see it.

It's OK. "techstud" has yet to figure out that he is neither.
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post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Slump View Post

There's a lot of confusion here, so I'll explain exactly what the problem is it happened to mine just a couple months ago. (It's still under warranty so of course Apple replaced it.)

When the cord is bent too far in any direction near the magsafe plug, the wiring inside get pressed hard against the insulation and heats it up, eventually burning a hole right through it. (I noticed the problem when I touched the cable and it nearly burned me.)

This is not an issue of abuse this can easily happen if your cable bends back behind your computer, as was the case with mine. I had absolutely no reason to think that a minor bend in the cable would be enough to destroy it. It should not do so.

I do believe that this is a problem with the products themselves, not their abuse.

This then is a problem with ALL cables. Any cord that is bent TOO far by definition exceeds it's design intent.
post #80 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


The final thing you're saying is that you're calling that person a liar.

Bingo!

Unless they can substantiate such wild claims, they are. Unfortunately in this case it's guilty until proven innocent, in my book. Too many trolls running wild with this fire/explosion idea that started as one or two isolated incidents long ago (misuse and abuse being just as likely causes as anything else), and then multiplied a hundredfold by the usual suspects. I don't buy it and I'm being up-front about it.

We need to be very careful when it comes to these wild negative claims abourt Apple products, especially since they are hardly widesperead. But when you get every second or third person (or troll) saying "me too!", then something is definitely fishy.

But that's just my persepective on the issue, and I'm certainly allowed to have it. Others have their own, obviously, etc.
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