or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple requires iPhone OS 3.0 support for all new mobile apps
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple requires iPhone OS 3.0 support for all new mobile apps - Page 2

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

The main problem I have is that testing an app on hardware requires having 3.0 on your iPhone/iPod Touch. Most "little guys" don't have multiple units lying around for testing, since Apple has said not to install the beta firmware on your primary device. This leads me to believe that the firmware needs to come out sooner rather than later, because it puts a developer in limbo if they want to test their apps for 3.0, but want to keep a stable iPhone OS on their phone for typical usage.

The 'little guys' making money from their sales need to reinvest in another unit then.
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixelcruncher View Post

Gotta wonder when developers are going to start charging for upgrades. Perfectly reasonable, but you've got to wonder about people with 50 paid apps that will have to start paying developers to keep their software up-to-date with Apple's software and hardware changes (especially if Apple's changes don't fall in line with a developer's product cycle). It has to happen sooner or later.

I agree with the sentiment, but I don't think this is anything unusual or unexpected.

Anyone who has done software development knows that you generally should expect to design to the latest OS or firmware and that as new versions come out you need to keep your app up-to-date. This is nothing new or specific to iPhone development. The (rare) exception to this is "corporate" software development wherein the app might purposely stay true to some crappy ancient OS or firmware (WinXP), in order to remain exactly the same, like some kind of software time capsule. Consumer software has never been like that and nor should it. The "corporate" development model is the anomaly.

Developers also have the option, (as they do with any software), to orphan their product on the old OS or firmware and create a new version (which has to be re-bought) for the new OS or firmware. This is all standard stuff and doesn't indicate any change to the basic financial model AFAICS.

I also find it hilarious that all the jailbreakers over on Ars Technica are raging out about this change even though it's clearly to every developers advantage to have a platform wherein the vast majority of users are always up to date with the latest patches, firmware etc. Talk about shooting themselves in the foot! In the old days it was considered a sort of Holy Grail of sorts to have a platform where everyone always updates, now it's some kind of heresy?
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonso Perez View Post

Your SQL knowledge will still be useful.

But PHP is just different. The iPhone is like a desktop environment, very different from producing pages for a Web server.

The logical way to start is to learn Objective-C (the language) and Cocoa or Cocoa Touch, the Mac and iPhone frameworks, respectively. In XCode, these are integrated into a nice, fairly complete IDE.

I started on the Mac with Aaron Hillegass's "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS/X", though there are a number of specifically iPhone books if you want to jump straight into that.

Objective-C is object-oriented but simple. Not like C++ and better than Java for writing UI type stuff. It does help if you have some experience with a C derivative of some kind, just to be comfortable with the general syntax.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

I don't know about PHP and MySQL but I came from Visual Basic and used RealBasic. The best thing about RealBasic was that you can compile your code for Mac, Windows, or Linux without any modifications. I am not a software developer but an architectural engineer who like to make my own programs.

I wanted to learn and understand Cocoa for Mac OS programing. I started from the basics with C programing and moved to Objective-C and then Cocoa. Except for C language, I used Apple documentation to move from C to Cocoa, Xcode, and Interface Builder. Don't waste your time and money buying books and use the documentation. I was surprised how easy it was to learn Mac and iPhone programing.

Thanks a lot, guys, for the advice! I may see if I can learn it over the summer, just in time for 3.0 to be released. Nothing like a little light reading during summer vacation!
post #44 of 47
A lot of the little guys, like me, make a free app and do it just for the love of it - buying a new iPhone/iPod etc just for testing is out of the question. I have to be able to build/test/debug iPhone 2.x apps on a 2.x iPhone - installing a 3.0 beta OS on my daily iPhone is out of the question. I have been somewhat leery of installing the 3.0 Dev kit unless I truly can have parallel dev environments.
post #45 of 47
Yes but what about people that cannot upgrade there iphones like the software unlocked phones?
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by iphonestore View Post

Yes but what about people that cannot upgrade there iphones like the software unlocked phones?

Thats their problem, isn't it? They chose to unlock their phones, and so if they have a problem like that, it's just too bad.
post #47 of 47
It seems like this time NetShare is going to be dead for sure.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple requires iPhone OS 3.0 support for all new mobile apps