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Apple opens developer forums to Snow Leopard discussion - Page 2

post #41 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

Apple has done the beta thing before. They really haven't had any reason lately. None of the OSX division have been radically different and they haven't screwed it up like Microsoft did with Vista. Microsoft has 7 out there as a beta as a way to redeem their image.

Agreed. Apple's methods have been quite successful so far.
post #42 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Back on track...

This developer forum will hopefully produce a lot more juicy info about the interworkings of Snow Leopard than otherwise could be achieved through a scattered developer platform. I don't even know if Grand Central and/or OpenCL have been integrated into SL yet.

Solipsism

Are you a Select developer? I know you've seen the recent seeds. I haven't heard of any reports about GC or OCL at all so who knows maybe those are delivered at WWDC. Apple's a damn good poker player.

They're going to have enough things whether it be performance or polish to get my $129.
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post #43 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Are you a Select developer? I know you've seen the recent seeds. I haven't heard of any reports about GC or OCL at all so who knows maybe those are delivered at WWDC. Apple's a damn good poker player.

They're going to have enough things whether it be performance or polish to get my $129.

I am, but I'm not deft enough to be able tell if they have been included yet. I'd think such things would need a lot of tweaking and feedback from developers about performance, but maybe it's one of those things you have to get right before you can include it all in your OS. I just hope that it's not one of those things that silently disappear off the Snow Leopard page, like how Resolution Independence vanished from Leopard.

What would you need to get the OS. It's already faster than Leopard in benchmarking, despite being unfinished. If they come through with everything they promised I think it will be worth the upgrade price.
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post #44 of 81
I could see Grand Central and OpenCL being something that will get "turned" on. I assume that much of GC doesn't need to be exposed to developers early on until its ready. These new developer forums are going to come into play and pay dividends when the WWDC build hits and whatever is currently inactive or hidden comes to the foreground.
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post #45 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison

1. Applications stall too much and beach ball.
2. Contextual menus end up cluttered with stuff you don't want from 3rd parties
3. The UI is a bit cobbled together.
4. No decent notification system
5. No uninstaller
6. Niggling things like the OS forgetting finder window settings sometimes

Consumers simply want a better OS. The wow factor for OS is pretty much at its zenith. Apple needs to get the message that the whole "shhhhhhhh we're working on something weally seekrit" is pretty much played out.

Developers don't get to talk about the new OS so therefore consumers don't fully understand the changes and the ramifications of the new changes. Apple's milked this cow long enough.

This is why AI is here. More important than any article I've ever read on this forum. Thank You.
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post #46 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is why AI is here. More important than any article I've ever read on this forum. Thank You.

Exactly ..thank God for AI. I've been here longer than any otther forum there were times where I didn't think it would remain a relevant source. Kaspar and crew have done an admirable job. We may not have the most registered forum members but I see Appleinsider quote or refrenced just about more than anyone. There's a lot of lurkers here coming for info.

Oh yes Ireland I gotta give you credit. You've championed the Mac Tablet forever and doggone if it doesn't look like we're headed down that road. Way to stick to your guns when everyone else was playing the Doubting Thomas. I'm totally cool with a tablet device now.
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post #47 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


I don't think it would be hard to make an app or a preference pane, as I stated above, and to have Xcode build in a simple process that auto-saves the different support file locations into a list so the Unistaller can get them easily. Also, being able to instruct a novice user to the Unistaller in the Prference Pane to delete a damaged Plist file that is causing an app to crash is much easier than walking them through ~/Library/Preferences and having them look for an app titles com.developer_name.something.et_cetera.plist. It's just not very Mac-like.

PS: I'd also like a less "scary" disc copying app for Mac OS X. The current method of the Finder to copy to the HDD into a burn folder you create and then burn, or to use Disk Utility is not very mac-like either. WIndows has had a one-button burn since XP.

Okay.. first of all let's talk about "Mac-Like". Mac Like has been not to need an uninstaller because before it wasn't needed. The idea of simply having to have something to un-install something is Not mac like. I don't disagree with your implication of a need for something to help out, but I'm more for redesigning the OS to a point to where It's simply not necessary. the truth is that for the most part, you can get rid of 95 percent of an app by simply dragging it to the trash. the problem is that some apps leave preference panes and fonts and contextual menu items. I think built in automation needs to be in place so that when You drag the corresponding app to the trash, those things are magically deleted as well. Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think this would be hard to do. The information should be kept in a file that's tied into the the programs Application Icon.

AS far as Disk Utility is Concerned I couldn't agree more. I've been a big proponent that Disk Utility should in fact be integrated completely into the Finder. Although I'm now a big fan of Disk Images, I must admit they are confusing at first. That said there is certainly a more intuitive way of creating and utilizing them. There should also be a much easier way of burning disk images. Copying Disks, Verifying them, Scanning a disk for errors should all be available functions in the Finder.
post #48 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Exactly ..thank God for AI. I've been here longer than any otther forum there were times where I didn't think it would remain a relevant source. Kaspar and crew have done an admirable job. We may not have the most registered forum members but I see Appleinsider quote or refrenced just about more than anyone. There's a lot of lurkers here coming for info.

I agree, I go to other sites but the forums do not compare with AI. It's hard to impossible to get a worthwhile discussion going on Digg, MacRumors, Engdaget, iLounge, Gizmodo, MacWorld, ArsTechnia, Howard and even more technical sites like AnandTech. I think it's partly the articles, which aren't just rumors and releases, but in-depth and well researched papers from technical to financial. The other part being the posters, which for the most part are well informed and willing to consider another PoV. I learn more from these forums than I do from reading tech articles from most sites.

Quote:
Oh yes Ireland I gotta give you credit. You've championed the Mac Tablet forever and doggone if it doesn't look like we're headed down that road. Way to stick to your guns when everyone else was playing the Doubting Thomas. I'm totally cool with a tablet device now.

His focus and dedication is admirable.
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post #49 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by webraider View Post

Okay.. first of all let's talk about "Mac-Like". Mac Like has been not to need an uninstaller because before it wasn't needed. The idea of simply having to have something to un-install something is Not mac like. I don't disagree with your implication of a need for something to help out, but I'm more for redesigning the OS to a point to where It's simply not necessary. the truth is that for the most part, you can get rid of 95 percent of an app by simply dragging it to the trash. the problem is that some apps leave preference panes and fonts and contextual menu items. I think built in automation needs to be in place so that when You drag the corresponding app to the trash, those things are magically deleted as well. Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think this would be hard to do. The information should be kept in a file that's tied into the the programs Application Icon.

I didn't mean to imply that you couldn't just trash the app, just that there needs to be a way to do a clean uninstall, too.

I like you idea better than mine! For example, having a simple XML listing of the item(s) in Info.plist, that is within the app under Contents when you Show Package Contents in the app that is queried before deleting the file Mac-like. Sometimes you want to save settings so having it ask you first wouldn't be bad either.

I don't think that would be hard to code, but we won't even be getting a Restore option for items in Trash until Snow Leopard, so perhaps it's more difficult that than.
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post #50 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

"open"?


Sure if you've got 500 dollars minimum. Microsoft is allowing people to download Beta and RC releases of Windows 7 to test it out. That's open.

I would expect Select and Premier developers to be able to discuss an OS they're supposed to have their applications ready for.

The secrecy thing is getting a bit old Apple.

Not agreeing or disagreeing with you only wanted to say I have been a beta tester for 7 for a long time and it didn't cost me a penny so far. It sucks by the way but that's another story.
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post #51 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


How many times have we Mac users had to go through this.

"ok to unmount that drive just drag it to the trash"

"but I don't want to delete my files!"

"oh no you won't it will just unmount the drive"

"well then why am I dragging it to the trash?"

)

By always adding ... "as you approach the trash/ wastebasket you see it change to an eject icon" has always prevents the confusion in my teaching of this.
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post #52 of 81
It's about time for Apple to do this. The growing pool of developers in the Apple ecosystems must have demanded this.

I recall that Microsoft was a bit secretive in the early days. Anyone remember OS/2 by a company called IBM? IBM and Microsoft were working on the OS together. Little did IBM know that Microsoft had other plans.

Don't tell Microsoft isn't secretive. I've seen it several times. How about Microsoft's response to Java -- C#? The DOJ stopped them from making their own Java VM, so they secretively made a Java clone. Surprise surprise ... it's called competition and Apple doesn't want to give a leg-up to their competition.

I predict Apple will make a grab for the Enterprise market. The real story of Snow Leopard will be two-fold - 1) A solidified OS with catering to the developer community ... and 2) The bundling of new server services in OSX Server for collaborative work.
post #53 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

I recall that Microsoft was a bit secretive in the early days. Anyone remember OS/2 by a company called IBM? IBM and Microsoft were working on the OS together. Little did IBM know that Microsoft had other plans.

As I recall it, IBM was well informed as to what MS was doing with Windows, but their hubris made them think that creating OS/2 was a good idea.
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post #54 of 81
[QUOTE=Developers don't get to talk about the new OS so therefore consumers don't fully understand the changes and the ramifications of the new changes. Apple's milked this cow long enough.[/QUOTE]

Developers are going to 'get the word out'.
post #55 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solipsism View Post

I don't even know if Grand Central or Open CL are available yet

Yes, they are and have always been active since the first developer preview, I believe.

They need people to move to these technologies quick smart and test their app performance on Snow Leopard.
post #56 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

Yes, they are and have always been active since the first developer preview, I believe.

They need people to move to these technologies quick smart and test their app performance on Snow Leopard.

I skimmed through a couple of the Snow Leopard WWDC 2008 sessions today. They do show that GC, at least, was implemented, in some regard, from the very start.
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post #57 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

As I recall it, IBM was well informed as to what MS was doing with Windows, but their hubris made them think that creating OS/2 was a good idea.

Lotus and WordPerfect didn't get the memo then, since they developed for OS/2 thinking Microsoft was supporting OS/2 wholeheartedly. Microsoft comes out with Windows 3.0 and their productivity tools for Windows while dumping their relationship with IBM and work on OS/2. Lotus and WordPerfect then had to scramble to come out with versions for Windows but by the time they did it was too late. Microsoft had already stole their thunder.
post #58 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Not agreeing or disagreeing with you only wanted to say I have been a beta tester for 7 for a long time and it didn't cost me a penny so far. It sucks by the way but that's another story.

On one hand, as a fellow 7 beta and RC tester for personal and professional reasons, one who's MSDN subscription went away with my job, thanks to the economy, I must say that Apple and their closed dev process is annoying as an outsider, but it is good in that the feedback Apple gets is from professional devs, who understand how shit works, Any dingbat with an extra box can send MS feedback, how much time and effort is spent weeding out crap and flames from the Windows feedback, and how many utterly retarded ideas survive this process to be presented to engineers, wasting their valuable and expensive time (think 35 - 50/Hr for a low to mid level OS engineer) By keeping the feedback loop tight, they end up fixing more real problems, and can deliver tighter code because they can make the existing stuff better rather than doing a thousand new "toys" "hacks" and "tweaks" for every Tom Dick and Suzie.
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post #59 of 81
Anyway,
I think it's funny people are comparing Microsoft's beta of Windows 7 and OS X 10.6. First off Windows NEEDS to beta it because of all the different hardware it's going to be used on. Second, MS needs to repair Windows' image so their doing it with the carrot. I think they've finally realized the stick doesn't work. Third, I don't care that W7 is a public beta. It's like saying Apple won't show off its electric screwdriver with multiple attachments while Microsoft is showing off it sh*t of a stick beta due for release sometime this year: I'll take the Apple way over the MS way any day of the week.
post #60 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

I wish this were the case. However, as good as Leopard is I believe it's pretty far from being a fantastic OS.

1. Applications stall too much and beach ball.
2. Contextual menus end up cluttered with stuff you don't want from 3rd parties
3. The UI is a bit cobbled together.
4. No decent notification system
5. No uninstaller
6. Niggling things like the OS forgetting finder window settings sometimes

Consumers simply want a better OS. The wow factor for OS is pretty much at its zenith. Apple needs to get the message that the whole "shhhhhhhh we're working on something weally seekrit" is pretty much played out.

Developers don't get to talk about the new OS so therefore consumers don't fully understand the changes and the ramifications of the new changes. Apple's milked this cow long enough.

I agree with you. Windows 7 will be released in the coming months and there's alot of positive feadback surrounding it. Apple is going to have steep competition when Microsoft releases there next operating system.

Apple sales have picked up tremendously within the last year or so which was partially due to people disliking Windows Vista and wanting something better. I like leopard alot but the more I hear about Windows 7 the more it makes me want to aventually switch to it.

As much as I love Leopard I find it alot easier to navigate and find my files on my Windows Vista computer. It would be great if on Snow Leopard, folder's could have picture's of what's in it.

I've got 100's of folder's and as it is now navigating to that specific file is tiresome. You can't search files in specific folder unless you're directly in that folder.

I agree with you that the wow factor is at it's height right now but it won't stay that way. People will begin losing interest in Leopard. Like I said, as Microsoft moves closer to releasing Windows 7, the attention will begin to move in that direction.

When I first heard about Snow Leopard I became very excited, but since then I've lost alot of my interest in it. I've heard very little regarding it but I still check this and other sites daily for any new info on Snow Leopard.
post #61 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLR2009 View Post

When I first heard about Snow Leopard I became very excited, but since then I've lost alot of my interest in it. I've heard very little regarding it but I still check this and other sites daily for any new info on Snow Leopard.

Yes this is one of the problems with shrouding your software in secrecy. There's initial excitement but then it wanes as nothing comes out (well, beyond rumor sites)

I am glad to see Apple allowing developers to speak about SL amongst themselves. They always have to tough decisions as to how to manage supporting legacy with the new stuff.

Plus with each new successive OS upgrade the tools for analyzing code improves. I'm sure it's not trivial to learn how to master these tools and how to architect a solid app. I'm sure SL is even stronger in these areas and the more developers sharing info the better for us all.
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post #62 of 81
Being able to discuss bottlenecks in parallel programming, multi-core enabled applications [which design patterns to implement and more] etc., with fellow devs in the community only helps Apple and the 3rd party community in shoring up their applications for 10.6 to take advantage of OpenCL and GrandCentral.
post #63 of 81
I doubt the guy actually thought he did. Further, he didn't say he was going to kick anybody's ass. He invited somebody to come to SF and kick his ass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue27 View Post

I really shouldn't get into this conversation, but I have to point out the obvious...

I don't think you actually scared anybody.
post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenRoethig View Post

Apple has done the beta thing before. They really haven't had any reason lately. None of the OSX division have been radically different and they haven't screwed it up like Microsoft did with Vista. Microsoft has 7 out there as a beta as a way to redeem their image.

MS had an open beta for Vista too, I know because I downloaded Beta 2 and RC 1 from them.

Also, as another poster said, it's in MS' best interests to have an open beta, because their are so many different configurations out there.

Oddly enough, I hated Vista in beta, but was probably one of the few that liked it in RTM, but then again, I was comparing it to XP when it went to RTM in 2001.

With Apple, since I'm not sure what they're really up to with SL, I have sort of lost interest, with Win7 coming out soon, and the fact that I can test it, for free.

But I'm sure when SL drops, Apple will have a page up, touting "300 new features", and I will then have to decide if it's worth the $129 upgrade. It's hard to make an informed decision, when you actually haven't heard much about said product, other than Grand Central and OpenCL, which mean absolutely nothing to me right now.
post #65 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

"open"?


Sure if you've got 500 dollars minimum. Microsoft is allowing people to download Beta and RC releases of Windows 7 to test it out. That's open.

I would expect Select and Premier developers to be able to discuss an OS they're supposed to have their applications ready for.

The secrecy thing is getting a bit old Apple.

Yes, Microsoft is giving away Windows 7, and I still don't want it. Now that tells you something doesn't it.

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post #66 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by guinness View Post

But I'm sure when SL drops, Apple will have a page up, touting "300 new features", and I will then have to decide if it's worth the $129 upgrade. It's hard to make an informed decision, when you actually haven't heard much about said product, other than Grand Central and OpenCL, which mean absolutely nothing to me right now.

That's what WWDC is for. Come June there will be a lot of disclosure on what Snow Leopard will mean to not just developers but also consumers. The excitement will come.

I truly believe Snow Leopard is going to be geared toward the SOHO to enterprise markets like previous OSX versions have not been before. We know this by the Exchange integration and some of the other enterprise features the server version will have. Depending on your perspective that's exciting - to me too.
post #67 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I do think there should be an uninstaller Preference Pane in System Preferences. All it would have to do is check some very simple files in the app to find out the file in the Preferences and Application Support files (and where ever else) in Library.

For apps that use a proper install you can choose Show Files from the Menu Bar to see where files are being installed. Since these might get written to and accessed in way that the app will not know about the installer could write to the Uninstaller PrefPane DB about the installation.

Mac users do tend to be more anal about their computer's files, which is probably due to Mac users being more technically savvy than the average Windows user, so I can see how a proper, native installer app would be nice. Sure, you can just delete the app from the Applications folder, but it's not pretty when you access your Library and see remnants of apps that you haven't used, seen or heard about for several years.

This all assumes that the installer is written by somebody who knows what they are doing. Many times you fined files that give no indication of what program they belong to or are put in really strange places.
post #68 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximara View Post

This all assumes that the installer is written by somebody who knows what they are doing. Many times you fined files that give no indication of what program they belong to or are put in really strange places.

This is why I mention Apple making it a default of their SDK so the developer can make easy work of it, automatic even. When the app starts up it looks for the PLIST and Application Support files. It wouldn't be hard be to have a XML listing of installed files that the installer can pull from.
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post #69 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

That's what WWDC is for. Come June there will be a lot of disclosure on what Snow Leopard will mean to not just developers but also consumers. The excitement will come.

I truly believe Snow Leopard is going to be geared toward the SOHO to enterprise markets like previous OSX versions have not been before. We know this by the Exchange integration and some of the other enterprise features the server version will have. Depending on your perspective that's exciting - to me too.

I'm not a dev, but the majority of anything I have heard about SL has just been rumors, other than OpenCL, Grand Central, and maybe QT X, but I'm not all sure what the later entails.

I'm sure if devs do utilize those tools, it may lead to better apps, but as an end user, that's going to take awhile to materialize.

I think I'll wait on SL, until more apps are released to take advantage of all it's new features, and after a couple point updates, so that Apple will fix the bugs for the early adopters, and maybe by then, I might have a new Mac too.
post #70 of 81
From what we have heard so far, the most exciting features we could expect in SL are:

Mostly user-oriented:
- New interface
- QuickTime X
- Resolution independence (not confirmed yet)

Mostly (small) business oriented:
- Exchange support

Mostly under the hood:
- Grand Central Dispatch.
- Open CL.
- New developer options: Location services, multi-touch improvements etc.
- Filesystem API improvements, ZFS support.
- more compile-time optimizations.

The under-the-hood changes will have some, albeit limited effect out-of-the-box, because the underlying frameworks used by all apps will be improved. The real advantage requires application redesign. The most important technology will be Grand Central Dispatch. Open CL will be suitable for a limited number of applications but the advantage there could be really big. My guess is that audio and video processing applications are good candidates for this.

One of the first apps to take advantage of the new technologies will be Apple's own apps, of course. But they will not be ready by the SL release. I do expect Apple to demo the technologies with a selected app though.

Long-term implications:
Snow Leopard sets the stage for the next generation OS. It finally breaks away with the legacy code (Carbon) and heads into the future. Polishing the new technologies will take some time.

It is important to understand that SL is developed with the future generations of the hardware in mind. Currently the majority of the CPUs in use are dual core (there are no quad-core notebooks yet, and the notebooks represent the majority of the computers sold during the last couple of years). In just a few years we should expect tens of cores being the common place (at least that's what Intel guys said). Apple is starting to build an OS which will be ready for this

Don't be confused by the netbooks sales figures. Netbooks will remain a separate category. Initially, they cannibalized some of the notebook sales at the very low end, but this trend will hit a wall. The netbooks are NEVER going to be the main device of managing one's digital life. It will be a supplement of the main computer for a limited number of tasks.
post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow View Post

From what we have heard so far, the most exciting features we could expect in SL are:

Mostly user-oriented:
- New interface
- QuickTime X
- Resolution independence (not confirmed yet)

Mostly (small) business oriented:
- Exchange support

Mostly under the hood:
- Grand Central Dispatch.
- Open CL.
- New developer options: Location services, multi-touch improvements etc.
- Filesystem API improvements, ZFS support.
- more compile-time optimizations.

The under-the-hood changes will have some, albeit limited effect out-of-the-box, because the underlying frameworks used by all apps will be improved. The real advantage requires application redesign. The most important technology will be Grand Central Dispatch. Open CL will be suitable for a limited number of applications but the advantage there could be really big. My guess is that audio and video processing applications are good candidates for this.

One of the first apps to take advantage of the new technologies will be Apple's own apps, of course. But they will not be ready by the SL release. I do expect Apple to demo the technologies with a selected app though.

Long-term implications:
Snow Leopard sets the stage for the next generation OS. It finally breaks away with the legacy code (Carbon) and heads into the future. Polishing the new technologies will take some time.

It is important to understand that SL is developed with the future generations of the hardware in mind. Currently the majority of the CPUs in use are dual core (there are no quad-core notebooks yet, and the notebooks represent the majority of the computers sold during the last couple of years). In just a few years we should expect tens of cores being the common place (at least that's what Intel guys said). Apple is starting to build an OS which will be ready for this

Don't be confused by the netbooks sales figures. Netbooks will remain a separate category. Initially, they cannibalized some of the notebook sales at the very low end, but this trend will hit a wall. The netbooks are NEVER going to be the main device of managing one's digital life. It will be a supplement of the main computer for a limited number of tasks.

We also get 64-bit from top to bottom (with 32-bit support included, just in case) I love the way they implemented it so you don't have to chose ahead of time what version to install.

All included SL apps, except for maybe iTunes, will be Cocoa.

As much as I want it, I'd be surprised if Resolution Independence were finished. There seems to be no change in it since Leopard when I turn it on.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #72 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

The secrecy thing is getting a bit old Apple.

So is the Prince McLean thing for Dilbert. I'm surprised AI puts up with it. It's certainly dragging their site down. As in people are sick and tired of it and won't be back, falling ad revenues, etc.
post #73 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is why AI is here. More important than any article I've ever read on this forum. Thank You.

Good grief what a load of tosh. This must be a Dilbert sock puppet.
post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

We also get 64-bit from top to bottom (with 32-bit support included, just in case) I love the way they implemented it so you don't have to chose ahead of time what version to install.

All included SL apps, except for maybe iTunes, will be Cocoa.

As much as I want it, I'd be surprised if Resolution Independence were finished. There seems to be no change in it since Leopard when I turn it on.


Correct. 64-bittiness should go to under-the-hood changes. As far as resolution independence goes, my hope is that it will come along the rumored Marble UI. Wishful thinking may be, but Apple is a bit late to the party here. If they plan to introduce different form factor device soon, they will need RI anyway.
post #75 of 81
CUPS 1.4 with additions specific for OS X only.
A new kernel.
An extended device driver model.
Various updates to 3rd party Dev Tools
Updates to TCP/IP, Samba, other network services
Updates to WebObjects, Java, Apache, etc.
post #76 of 81
"I agree with you that the wow factor is at it's height right now but it won't stay that way. People will begin losing interest in Leopard. Like I said, as Microsoft moves closer to releasing Windows 7, the attention will begin to move in that direction.
"

it's fascinating how we speak about tools, software, to do work and hobbies, like we speak about new dolls, fighting like little girls about the new fashion.

the "wow factor".. tell me it's "how the world works, man", and I will say : "just yours".


I don't care about the "wow factor". I only care in an efficient and pleasant computer.
post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by noivad View Post

Anyway,
I think it's funny people are comparing Microsoft's beta of Windows 7 and OS X 10.6. First off Windows NEEDS to beta it because of all the different hardware it's going to be used on.

I think you guys would freak if you ever knew how many configurations OSX had to support. Its newer modular nature is just better at it than windows.
post #78 of 81
The Apple forum is just awful. There are like 10 posts per day and the atmosphere is like Siberia.
post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

The Apple forum is just awful. There are like 10 posts per day and the atmosphere is like Siberia.

HAHA It is pretty bad right now. I have asked a couple questions and have no replies with very few thread views.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

HAHA It is pretty bad right now. I have asked a couple questions and have no replies with very few thread views.

Yes. I have this picture in my head of an entire rack of shiny new multicore servers at Apple processing... 10 posts per day.
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