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Wal-Mart's new Apple section seen as precursor to Mac sales - Page 4

post #121 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

My netbook, because I'll probably sell the MacBook. The MacBook does nothing I need to do on a portable computer that my netbook can't do.

I just want to point out that you did state it as your needs, which is a legitimate reason, and that you are not stating a netbook can do everything a MacBook can do.

Quote:
Since you're not aware, you should know that not all netbooks are the same. You seem to think they're all crap after having seen two.

They run from about $250 to over $1000. I would imagine an Apple netbook would be around $800, maybe $500-$600 if subsidized with a $60/month data plan.
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post #122 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I just want to point out that you did state it as your needs, which is a legitimate reason, and that you are not stating a netbook can do everything a MacBook can do.

Correct, the MacBook with its dual core processor is faster and more suitable than a netbook for those who use a portable as their only computer.

Not intending to get off topic, I couldn't help responding to the notion that "netbooks are crap." Obviously, some are better than others, and for some people they are not powerful enough. Comparing a netbook with a real keyboard and 10" screen to an iPhone is like comparing a car to a motorcycle, or something like that.
Quote:
They run from about $250 to over $1000. I would imagine an Apple netbook would be around $800, maybe $500-$600 if subsidized with a $60/month data plan.

If Apple ever offers something similar to current 10" netbooks, I agree with you, it'll probably be priced around $800 and I'd hope it'll be sold at Wal-Mart. It'll probably be comparable to Windows netbooks that cost around $500 and will probably look a little prettier.

FYI: I'm a Mac user since 1989. My Samsung netbook is my first ever Windows computer and I now use it more than I use my Macs. When it comes to casual surfing and email, it's the device I go to first; not my desktop Mac, not my MacBook and certainly not my iPod touch.
post #123 of 168
Apple? Walm'art? Wally world? Really?

LOL. Well that about blows any "cheap" or ""apples above" that fanboy 10% is the bestest place you can be theory out if the water now. LOL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

But they can move boxes.

And who know what Apple's product landscape is going to be even in a couple of years with mobile devices taking off.
post #124 of 168
Well, yeah I mean look at the past month if apple ads, windows bashing, palm pre, "Apple don't do cheap" "crap" statements coming from all the Jobs can do no wrong crowd, I mean, wow, talk about a major meltdown.

Of course maybe Apple can make cheap cool. Or, they're getting ready for subsidized netbooks ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by harmsway View Post

Soon as I saw the headline Wal-Mart may carry Apple computers, I was waiting for all the condescending comments about Wal-Mart and its customers. This is so arrogant, frustrating and unnecessary. As long as Apples quality remains high, it should not matter if their products are sold at Wal-Mart. Apple should not try to only cater to snobs, but gain as much market share as possible. Ive been an Apple fan for years and feel this type of junior high discussion alienates a lot of potential new Apple customers.
post #125 of 168
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Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Amen to that, brother.

Well everyone needs a job so try not to bash the employees.

That said it's about service and mac so called specialists don't make that much so it wouldn't hurt them to have employees from Apple thing is, have you ever been in a Walmart? They can be dead in there. I can picture it now, the iMac will be looping the mac vs pc commercial while the retro music from the progressive car commercial plays in the background, meanwhile, price check on isle 18 please, comes over the loud speaker and the iMac display, not ├╝ber lined up like in the Apple store like some OCD, lies all crooked and cracked. No customers near it. That's a sad sight but almost certain to be true. All the prices will be in English/Spanish/Korean. Almost instantly, the branding could be tarnished. All depends in service and if a new product comes out.
post #126 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post


LOL. Well that about blows any "cheap" or ""apples above" that fanboy 10% is the bestest place you can be theory out if the water now. LOL.

Whoa. Dude. Words. In order. Punctuation. Something.
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post #127 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Whoa. Dude. Words. In order. Punctuation. Something.

Aww man, the irony is I went online to delete this post - who cares where the mac's are sold.

Stupid iPhone though, that last post was on the iPhone. Everytime you post something on a forum, the keyboard takes up half the bottom, I type "fir" more often than "for" and the auto correct replaces some of my words that I don't catch until I read the post much later.

Unlike some, if I post a reply, I will go back to the where I left off, whereas now I may have a few windows open (24" display). Anyway, should be interesting to see what happens, I just wonder if there will be decent customer service or will it be a ghost town with retro music playing in the background.

Progressive music, price check isle 18, crooked display, missing buttons, hee he he. ..
It's so sad it's funny, not that they are selling at Wally World but watching everyone's reaction to this news. ..:

Time for bed.

Peace all...

EDIT: Actually, the sentence, without the punctuation, sounds and reads as intended. ..
lol:
post #128 of 168
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Originally Posted by blogorant View Post

[B]


Amen!

Love The MAC, Hate The Fanboy.

Wow. Best statement I've read here in a long time.

You know, if you have a good background with PCs I'd Macs, you can go over the head if most mac specialists. Most of them do not know much more than the scope if their products. Most could not tell you what FSB does or how DDR 2 differs from DDR3.

If Apple played their cards right, there's no reason that they can't hire all computer gurus. All towns have them and most would match if not exceed the, the so called "specialist" at Apple.
post #129 of 168
I'm an artist/composer. I have made big money to eating top ramin so you're welcome in my book any day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquatic View Post

I shop at Wal-Mart. I am an environmentalist and an independent in terms of politics but with a socialist-leaning philosophy 80% of the time. But I shop at Wal-Mart. Why? Because I am poor. OK lower middle class. After federal taxes, I am close to the poverty line. I am fine with that.

Nevertheless, what do I buy at Wal-Mart? Frequently, brand name stuff. High end or middle of the road stuff. Nobody messes with Wal-Mart. It negotiates the best prices, and usually but not always passes them on to consumers at least in part. Of course you have to be smart, it is fascinating how not everything on any given day will be cheaper at Wal-Mart, but again, many times it is. Thus, I would not be surprised if they chipped 10 or 20 bucks off some Mac or iPod models. Apple would probably only have to sell them for a few bucks less, but Wal-Mart's economy of scale would do the rest. Why do people shop at Wal-Mart? To save that 10 bucks. Because when you are poor or middle-class, 10 bucks is, well, 10 bucks. It's something.

Will Wal-Mart diminish Apple's "brand", which certainly helps it charge what it does and have high and industry-leading profit margins? Perhaps. Maybe that is why Apple won't sell Macs at Wal-Mart. But if it does, that's probably where I'll get my next Mac. Probably a lot of other folks, too. Either way, I'm sure AAPL is on its way up and up.
post #130 of 168
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Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

*golf clap*

Bill Murray? Rodney Dangerfield? Caddyshack?
LOL
post #131 of 168
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Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Bravo!

Those are very good points!

Indeed. I'm actually inspired. This was truly a really good post.
post #132 of 168
Dude. Didn't you read what the other poster said about apple genius bar? It's true. I have a friend who works there now and most if what they do know is "scripted" and their technical knowledge is limited at best. The send out for most of the repairs. Ironically, I also have an undercover narc detective friend and when he pointed it out, I was amazed. Most Apple employees smoke pot, some do meth, and one time he told me about two seperate incidents at the same Apple store, credit card and check fraud by the employees. Sort of puts things in perspective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

I think you're missing the point. When you buy Apple, you're not just buying the box. You're buying the knowledge and service (Apple experts, etc.) with it. One of the reasons why Apple opened its own stores is because they were unhappy with the way that Macs were sold within other retail environments and the stores they were unhappy with do a far better job than WalMart does.

People who shop in WalMart are looking for the lowest possible prices on relatively low-end merchandise (even if low prices are not actually the reality of WalMart, just the perception.) Personally, I don't think Mac belongs in there at all, but if it is going to be there, it should only be done via a "store within a store" concept with Apple, not Wal-Mart employees, selling and supporting the products. But again, I'd prefer not to see the products there at all because I think it will damage Apple's reputation in the long run.
post #133 of 168
While some of this may be true, take what yet another poster said, take 80% of those ion Apple stores and place in walm'art. Perceived as poor. Half probaby fall into lower tax brackets but that does make them less of a person. We all have dreams. Every single one of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And I think this speaks to the point being made that Walmart (without having to go into any demographic name calling) may not be a great fit for what Apple is selling, as it stands now (which is not to say that Apple hasn't negotiated some kind of advantageous exception, although that goes against everything I know about Walmart).

That is to say, the "hand over the box" model is great if you're selling commodity goods for as little as possible. As even Walmart's defenders acknowledge, that's pretty much the point. You don't go to Walmart for the "experience", you go there to buy stuff you need, cheaply as possible. In fact, that's why I generally don't go there-- the grim vibe of necessity is just depressing to me. Even the (only slightly more expensive) Target seems like some kind of luxury boutique, in comparison.

But Apple very much is selling "an experience." You can take potshots at them all you like if that strikes you as "elitist" or "shallow" or whatever, but that's the deal and it seems to be working pretty well. The entire reason Apple launched their own retail outlets was because mass marketers where failing to "tell the story" of the "Apple experience."

And it's important that that story get told, because if it's simply a matter of buying the cheapest available example of the genre, Apple always loses. They need a chance to make their case for why you might want to spend a bit more, but Walmart, by design, seriously mitigates against that case, with every fiber of its being.

As I say, maybe they'll work something out so that an "Apple zone" manages to seem more Apple than Walmart, but the "cheap is better" force field is simply part of the place's DNA, so it doesn't seem promising.
post #134 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post


Unlike some, if I post a reply, I will go back to the where I left off, whereas now I may have a few windows open (24" display).

I do the same thing, which is why if I go away for a couple of days, I don't usually come back to the thread, because so many post are up that I don't have the time to read them.

It's annoying when people proudly state that they won't read older posts, and then proceed to make comments that have long before been dealt with.
post #135 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

Wow. Best statement I've read here in a long time.

You know, if you have a good background with PCs I'd Macs, you can go over the head if most mac specialists. Most of them do not know much more than the scope if their products. Most could not tell you what FSB does or how DDR 2 differs from DDR3.

If Apple played their cards right, there's no reason that they can't hire all computer gurus. All towns have them and most would match if not exceed the, the so called "specialist" at Apple.

I find that to be true of many Pc "experts" as well. Particularly at PC stores, even specialty shops.

I actually had the service guy of a PC shop ask me why I was buying back-up tapes when my machines had CD PLAYERS!

Believe me, the level of both PC users and their advisory personnel are no more technically knowledgeable that those in the Mac end.
post #136 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And it's important that that story get told, because if it's simply a matter of buying the cheapest available example of the genre, Apple always loses. They need a chance to make their case for why you might want to spend a bit more, but Walmart, by design, seriously mitigates against that case, with every fiber of its being.

As I say, maybe they'll work something out so that an "Apple zone" manages to seem more Apple than Walmart, but the "cheap is better" force field is simply part of the place's DNA, so it doesn't seem promising.

Very well stated, and not just because I agree, but because you said it better than I did.

The plan at Wal-Mart seems to be to go after the consumer electronics market vacancy opened up by the Circuit City bankruptcy. What has not been said yet is that duplicating a Circuit City-like shopping experience is an awfully low bar. This happens to be another retailer that displayed Apple products very poorly when they carried them. Another point that I think deserves to be repeated is that Wal-Mart has developed an extremely successful retail formula. It certainly remains to be seen whether they're open to altering it one iota to suit Apple's very different approach.
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post #137 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by gordy View Post

I went into my Wal-mart yesterday evening. No Apple products can be physically touched--not even iPod accessories. Right by Griffin, Belkin, and other items is a photo/card of the Apple version with instructions to take it to the electronics counter to purchase. iPods could never be touched, and the iPhone is now behind a thick piece of plastic too. If Macs do end up in Wal-mart, it appears that Apple has learned from past transgressions.

You can't touch them at Costco either. Unfortunately the world is full of thieves and since the boxes are so small, they cannot be left out for anyone to pick up. Best Buy has them out on display, locked to a podium like the digital cameras. Most Apple Stores have them locked up too and an associate needs to get one for you.
post #138 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

You can't touch them at Costco either. Unfortunately the world is full of thieves and since the boxes are so small, they cannot be left out for anyone to pick up. Best Buy has them out on display, locked to a podium like the digital cameras. Most Apple Stores have them locked up too and an associate needs to get one for you.

That's true of most places. Staples and a lot of other retailers, keep numerous items in locked cabinets.
post #139 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

Since you're not aware, you should know that not all netbooks are the same. You seem to think they're all crap after having seen two.

Apparently you didn't read. The one they had on display was the #1, highest rated Netbook sold and reviewed. It was the Asus Eee PC, and it was a cheap piece of shit. So if the number 1 rated Netbook was made with cheap plastics and a lousy keyboard, then yes, I don't need to see any others.
post #140 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiimamac View Post

Indeed. I'm actually inspired. This was truly a really good post.

Thank you. When most of these selfish little brats concerned with nothing more than "image" lose their jobs (and you won't know you are getting laid off until the deed is done!), Wal Mart (and Target) will become their most favorite store in the world. It has kept me alive during unemployment and I am no longer doing regular shopping at a supermarket because I am done paying high prices and getting ripped off. Now if only their BluRay titles were discounted like their other products. That waiting list is on hold until I get a new job.
post #141 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

I think you're missing the point. When you buy Apple, you're not just buying the box. You're buying the knowledge and service (Apple experts, etc.) with it. One of the reasons why Apple opened its own stores is because they were unhappy with the way that Macs were sold within other retail environments and the stores they were unhappy with do a far better job than WalMart does.

People who shop in WalMart are looking for the lowest possible prices on relatively low-end merchandise (even if low prices are not actually the reality of WalMart, just the perception.) Personally, I don't think Mac belongs in there at all, but if it is going to be there, it should only be done via a "store within a store" concept with Apple, not Wal-Mart employees, selling and supporting the products. But again, I'd prefer not to see the products there at all because I think it will damage Apple's reputation in the long run.

Now that is funny. The Apple Experience. Have you ever talked to an Apple Genius? They are complete idiots. One tried to push AppleCare on a Nano telling the customer the hard drive inside could fail.

A friend of mine took his iBook G4 (2005 model, still supported by Apple Service) in for repair because it would not receive power from AC or charge. The Genius, clueless about known issues with the iBook, told him it was not repairable and he should buy a MacBook for $1200. He wouldn't even diagnose the iBook. I googled "iBook no power" and found plenty of articles regarding the iBook and failed solder joints on the DC Board. The DC Board is a $49 part, and it is the actual Apple part. I repaired his iBook in about an hour.

Since you have never stepped foot in a WalMart, you have no idea what you are talking about. They don't carry low-end merchandise. They sell the same electronics that Best Buy does. Wii, XBox 360, PS3, plenty of digital cameras, camcorders, HDTV's, etc. They are not branded "WalMart." So you are honestly going to spend more money at Best Buy when you can save a few bucks at WalMart?

I bet most of you don't buy a Mac from Apple or an Apple Store. Are you so concerned about image that you will pay top dollar with sales tax just so you can claim how cool you are because you bought it from Apple? I bet most of you buy your Macs from Amazon.com (or other online retailer) to save a few bucks on the purchase price and save a few hundred more on sales tax.
post #142 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's true of most places. Staples and a lot of other retailers, keep numerous items in locked cabinets.

Yes, but many of their small electronic items, such as cameras, are on secured displays. The "no touch" approach may work for warehouse stores, where customers have been conditioned to not expect to see a product before they buy it, so they have probably done their comparison shopping somewhere else. Even Apple can do well in these environments with products that have been effectively pre-sold to consumers, such as iPods. But I think experience tells us that the Mac has still to be sold in a more active retail environment, because the default purchase in the minds of most consumers is still Windows.

Wal-Mart, at least as they do things now, is kind of worst case scenario for Apple. Any time I've been in a Wal-Mart store, their computer offerings consisted almost entirely of the lowest of low-end Windows machines, often sold in bundle boxes.
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post #143 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Wal-Mart, at least as they do things now, is kind of worst case scenario for Apple. Any time I've been in a Wal-Mart store, their computer offerings consisted almost entirely of the lowest of low-end Windows machines, often sold in bundle boxes.

No different than Best Buy. Most of their offerings are the low-end for the low price.
post #144 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

No different than Best Buy. Most of their offerings are the low-end for the low price.

No, actually, I think it is different from Best Buy. From what I've seen, Walmart's computer offerings definitely skew much cheaper than Best Buy, which actually has a pretty fair range.

Not a lot of premium stuff, mind you, but not nothing but the cheapest to be had.
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post #145 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Yes, but many of their small electronic items, such as cameras, are on secured displays. The "no touch" approach may work for warehouse stores, where customers have been conditioned to not expect to see a product before they buy it, so they have probably done their comparison shopping somewhere else. Even Apple can do well in these environments with products that have been effectively pre-sold to consumers, such as iPods. But I think experience tells us that the Mac has still to be sold in a more active retail environment, because the default purchase in the minds of most consumers is still Windows.

Wal-Mart, at least as they do things now, is kind of worst case scenario for Apple. Any time I've been in a Wal-Mart store, their computer offerings consisted almost entirely of the lowest of low-end Windows machines, often sold in bundle boxes.

I also notice though that many of those cameras either don't work, or aren't there. The display is empty.
post #146 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I also notice though that many of those cameras either don't work, or aren't there. The display is empty.

I've always thought that a poorly maintained display item is worse than no item at all.

How often have you seen, say, a music player kiosk or table that ostensibly gives you a broad range of product to sample, only to discover that fully half of the items on display are missing (leaving behind that sad little tether), malfunctioning or just dead? Not to mention that such displays are typically kind of ratty looking in general, having been throughly worked over by the lovely and tender buying public, who, judging from appearances, evaluate electronic items by chewing on them to see if they taste good.

Certainly doesn't put me in the mood to whip out my wallet.
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post #147 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

No different than Best Buy. Most of their offerings are the low-end for the low price.

I wouldn't say that Best Buy is a great or even good retail environment for Apple either. I don't know how it's great for anyone, really.
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post #148 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I've always thought that a poorly maintained display item is worse than no item at all.

How often have you seen, say, a music player kiosk or table that ostensibly gives you a broad range of product to sample, only to discover that fully half of the items on display are missing (leaving behind that sad little tether), malfunctioning or just dead? Not to mention that such displays are typically kind of ratty looking in general, having been throughly worked over by the lovely and tender buying public, who, judging from appearances, evaluate electronic items by chewing on them to see if they taste good.

Certainly doesn't put me in the mood to whip out my wallet.

I agree. I see this all the time. What happens, from what I've been told, is that people try to break off the products. Sometimes an alarm goes off. but by then it might be broken, so they remove it. Or they just break from handling. I've seen people pull a camera up, but the spring force on the cord was too strong, and it popped out of their hands, and smacked into the display, hitting the camera next to it.

Not good!
post #149 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I wouldn't say that Best Buy is a great or even good retail environment for Apple either. I don't know how it's great for anyone, really.

It must be good for someone since they are the nations biggest electronic retailer. Apple is supposedly very happy with sales at BB.
post #150 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I wouldn't say that Best Buy is a great or even good retail environment for Apple either. I don't know how it's great for anyone, really.

The Apple area set up in the Best Buy in Valencia CA is very nice. Now I can get more Apple products/accessories in a 5 minute drive instead of a 30 minute drive. All iMacs/MacBooks were fully operational, the demo is easy to quit to test drive the computer, and all of them are on the internet. They even mark down the customer return items too. Would I buy a Mac from them? No, I would stick with Amazon.com for the extra savings (no tax). Accessories and other lower cost items? You bet! It looks like a very tiny Apple Store.
post #151 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It must be good for someone since they are the nations biggest electronic retailer. Apple is supposedly very happy with sales at BB.

I'm sure it must be. Personally, the stores give me the creeps. The last time I was in one, at least the Macs were plugged in and working. That's a lot better treatment than they've had at so many other mass market retailers we could mention.

One thing to keep in mind about consumer electronics retailers -- the casualty rate is extremely high. Best Buy may be on the top of the heap now, but then probably so was Circuit City at one time. So were Silo, Federated, CompUSA, and whole bunch of others which are now history.
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post #152 of 168
Seems the discussion is going away from Macs for the moment, so I'll just add that Best Buy employees tend to have a clue regarding the products they sell. Also, since they deal with mostly expensive electronics, they realize the importance of theft, vandalism, the errant child messing with the shiny things. In summary, they do a better job with their displays than Wal-mart.

Regarding 'lower-end electronics' being sold at Wal-mart: I think there is truth to it. Wal-mart has the sheer size to demand manufacturers sell an item at a set price. All the manufacturer can do is cut corners to make the price while also making a profit. Cheaper plastics, cheaper components, etc. Hell, I'd imagine entire product lines are developed specifically for Wal-mart distributiion. I doubt the same televisions sold in Wal-mart are being sold in Hi-Fi Buys. When people inquire about buying an HP/Sony/Vizio/etc. at Wal-mart, I just say 'you'll get what you pay for.'
post #153 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I'm sure it must be. Personally, the stores give me the creeps. The last time I was in one, at least the Macs were plugged in and working. That's a lot better treatment than they've had at so many other mass market retailers we could mention.

One thing to keep in mind about consumer electronics retailers -- the casualty rate is extremely high. Best Buy may be on the top of the heap now, but then probably so was Circuit City at one time. So were Silo, Federated, CompUSA, and whole bunch of others which are now history.

Here's a fun game to play: when you go into a Best Buy, take just a few minutes to walk the boom box, TV and home stereo aisles, and just turn everything down.

One person in about 5 minutes can radically alter the "environment" of a Best Buy, which from my experience is largely a function of having many, many sound producing items turned up to 11.

Honestly, I've cut the ambient cacophony by 75% or more, and while the noise level will of course start to creep back up over time, I've found that I can create a much more relaxing store for whatever time it takes me to do whatever it is I need to do.

Of course, sometimes there's another kind of shopper (or staff person!) who will register the relative quiet as "wrong", and start to go around turning things up, because, sadly, a lot of people now regard a booming, thudding, squealing roar as normal, comfortable background noise and get anxious if you take it away.

Such people are monsters, and should be killed with fire.
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post #154 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Here's a fun game to play: when you go into a Best Buy, take just a few minutes to walk the boom box, TV and home stereo aisles, and just turn everything down.

You do that too? Nice to know I'm not the only one. Though I do sometimes feel like a borderline criminal when I do this, since the salespeople tend to be lurking around and almost always turn the volume right back up, and you usually get a dirty look if they catch you. The cacophony is mandatory!

I don't know if it still works, but I used to carry a TV silencer on my keychain. It sends all of the "off" codes used by TV remotes. Worked great in electronic stores, airports, restaurants.
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post #155 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Thank you. When most of these selfish little brats concerned with nothing more than "image" lose their jobs (and you won't know you are getting laid off until the deed is done!), Wal Mart (and Target) will become their most favorite store in the world. It has kept me alive during unemployment and I am no longer doing regular shopping at a supermarket because I am done paying high prices and getting ripped off. Now if only their BluRay titles were discounted like their other products. That waiting list is on hold until I get a new job.

No no no, thank you.

I have worked at standard union rate of $200.00 an hour, making $10,000 grand a week, then managed a coffee shop at $15.00 an hour, I have also worked with very famous ent. clients and due to note doing "coke" with them, had them become nervous and not trust me, a moral call, and then lose work, I have had my roommate a band member of Poison and going to one of their multimillion dollar homes, I have seen things come full circle, seen the seedy side of the business which I think has jaded me. Now I am a humble person who from time to time, may bash windows then mac, but never a persons status on where they are in life.

Know one grows up saying, I want to be poor and work at Walmart or similar. I could set up some girls and do a porn site and make a lot of money and be good at it, but that;s not me, it goes against my moral compass, so I deal with the cards I have been dealt with hopes of success being a nice guy, (harder than being the bad guy, as I have been that a little, but got on the right road before it was too late) and hope that it all works out.

Your message was very inspiring, especially for those that have seen both the richness and poor of their life and when I think about the post of taking 80% of Apple shoppers and putting them in Walmart, I can't help but snicker as you are right, everyone likes to feel rich and walking into an Apple store with some girl on your side, makes some feel that way, when I was a kid, I was renting SUITES in Hotels at $300 an night, that was in the late 80's, can't imagine the prices now, but I was a self absorbed punk.

I then married the right women, and because of her, am on a road that puts others first.

Again, thanks for the inspiration. ..
post #156 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

You do that too? Nice to know I'm not the only one. Though I do sometimes feel like a borderline criminal when I do this, since the salespeople tend to be lurking around and almost always turn the volume right back up, and you usually get a dirty look if they catch you. The cacophony is mandatory!

I don't know if it still works, but I used to carry a TV silencer on my keychain. It sends all of the "off" codes used by TV remotes. Worked great in electronic stores, airports, restaurants.

Oh dear God I would pay dearly for such a device. Do you have a link?

On a side note, I've done a fair amount of what I guess you would call "conceptual public art", and I once did a piece with some students wherein we burned a bunch of CDs and DVDs with individual sounds of the natural world-- you know, one CD with a particular bird song, one with another, a DVD with the sound of running water, or another with crickets, etc.

The DVDs had images of clouds, forest, etc.

About a dozen people showed up and started casually putting the DVDs and CDs into various players, at the same time turing down anything we couldn't control, like the demo HD feeds.

It happened very gradually, so that nobody really noticed for while, but the usual trapped inside a video game vibe steadily gave way to a fair approximation of a summer's day in the wilderness-- and in that the sound was coming from a lot of discrete point sources, it was actually very immersive.

At some threshold point you could see the dawning awareness amongst shoppers and staffers alike that something had been seriously hacked, there was kind of a shared moment of happy glee, and then staff people started industriously dealing with it.

Hack your local Best Buy! It's fun!
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #157 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Oh dear God I would pay dearly for such a device. Do you have a link?

Sure do -- it's the TV-B-Gone. I see they're up to generation 3. I've probably got the original device, so chances are it doesn't work so well anymore.

I'm impressed by your guerilla art. Done this more than once?
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #158 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Sure do -- it's the TV-B-Gone. I see they're up to generation 3. I've probably got the original device, so chances are it doesn't work so well anymore.

Thanks!

Quote:
I'm impressed by your guerilla art. Done this more than once?

Yeah. I do kind of a lot of it, although not so much lately. I had a long running piece at the local Ikea that involved replacing the descriptive tags on the top floor show room with perfect replicas (and I mean perfect, lot of Illustrator time and light tables involved) that only varied with a line or two, or sometimes just a word. Also some modified versions of the larger hanging signs, the little fabric samples, etc.

This was at an Ikea that sits pretty much on top of a destroyed Ohlone Indian midden, where Temescal Creek hits the SF bay, so the underlying idea was that a certain strangeness was sort of "haunting" the store, coming up from the buried water below. The original notion came from noticing how the jam-packed first floor warehouse level seemed like a weird echo of that long vanished midden, and because because one of the Ikea lines is called "Lack", which I found funny and a little poignant.

Since I only changed little bits and pieces, and because the replicas still functioned as originally intended, they usually didn't get noticed by the staff, much. But if you shopped at that Ikea and looked a lot of tags, you might have gotten the odd feeling that the store itself was having a bit of an existential crisis and muttering darkly to itself about the limits of consumption as an antidote for despair.

After a while I started tossing in invented objects "for sale" that played into the narrative idea I had (big knotted things, translucent scrims, just basic useless shapes that spoke to blocking and frustration) but those got spotted after a while and once they had they didn't last long when introduced.

I once did an entirely invented large informational sign (as opposed to strategic editing) and it was like I had put a feral animal in there. The staff immediately noticed, took it down, cleared the furniture away from the area, and just generally seemed to be completely weirded out, which was interesting.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #159 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yeah. I do kind of a lot of it, although not so much lately. I had a long running piece at the local Ikea that involved replacing the descriptive tags on the top floor show room with perfect replicas (and I mean perfect, lot of Illustrator time and light tables involved) that only varied with a line or two, or sometimes just a word. Also some modified versions of the larger hanging signs, the little fabric samples, etc.

Great stuff. A friend of mine sometimes goes into thrift stores and inscribes the used books. Such as, "To my good friend Ronald Reagan, best wishes, Gore Vidal." That certainly has to mess with people's realities and expectations (always a sound motivation for art), and probably moves a few extra books at the local Goodwill besides.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #160 of 168
FYI, this is the "large informational sign" that caused such a stir:

They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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