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iPhone OS 3.0 app highlights: TomTom GPS, Line 6, more

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
As in March, Apple at WWDC showcased a swath of new apps that take advantage of everything iPhone OS 3.0 can do. AppleInsider has some of the highlights, including the first-ever true, turn-by-turn GPS app for the iPhone.

TomTom: iPhone GPS app and car accessory kit

Of the many apps demonstrated at Apple's WWDC keynote, the most prominent was TomTom's GPS app.

The company's Peter-Frans Pauwels announced that his firm would have new navigation software this summer that takes advantage of iPhone OS 3.0's support for true, turn-by-turn directions; the app will have both nation-specific and international maps from TomTom itself, work in either landscape or portrait modes, and voice out directions.

An accessory kit will also showcase 3.0's support for more than just basic accessories. It will act as a basic suction-cup mount for the dashboard or windshield but, additionally, will amplify the GPS signal, support both hands-free calling and music through the stereo system, and charge the iPhone from the car's 12-volt port.





AirStrip Technologies: AirStrip CC

While support for medical accessories is nothing new, AirStrip is promising something much more with its AirStrip CC (Critical Care) app.

Dr. Cameron Powell's demonstration showed that the app can take live sensor data and feed it to the iPhone over the Internet in real-time, giving them access to data even when they're not at the hospital. The touchscreen lets doctors measure out critical statistics, like the distance between unusual heartbeats, by tapping two points.



The background push notification system in iPhone OS 3.0 means that health care experts of any kind also don't have to keep checking the app in case of an emergency or an unusual lab test; if data exceeds certain conditions, the app can flash an alert even when it's closed.

Line 6/Planet Waves' guitar and amp controls

Appealing to musicians, Line 6/Planet Waves has developed an app that will allow an iPhone to modify the output of a guitar or its amplifier through an accessory. Over 80 real and virtual amp styles can be simulated, and the new app can (much like GarageBand) alter the type of guitar heard; an electric 6-string guitar can be tweaked to produce a 12-string acoustic sound, for example.

Tilting the iPhone on its side switches to a view of knobs that can fine-tune the characteristics of the sound, including its stage presence.



Notably, the company's presenters encountered problems getting the accessory and software to work perfectly together and thus suggested that they may be some time away from being completely ready.

Zipcar's rental app

Particularly relevant for those in major cities like Chicago, San Francisco and others where Zipcar is prevalent, the company's self-titled app was Apple's centerpiece example for the ability to embed the Google Maps framework in a third-party app.

In his run-through, Luke Schneider of Zipcar showed the app locating every available Zipcar on a Google map, either nearby the owner (using GPS) or manually specified areas. They can then see which cars are available in a given area, down to the specific model and cost, and reserve those cars directly from the phone.

Importantly, iPhone owners won't even have to worry as much about keys or remembering which car is theirs. Thanks to the app, customers can unlock their cars remotely or honk the car's horn to identify it if more than one is nearby.



Images kindly provided by Electronista.
post #2 of 25
Wow, all this is so frikkin' exciting!!
post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

As in March, Apple at WWDC showcased a swath of new apps that take advantage of everything iPhone OS 3.0 can do. AppleInsider has some of the highlights, including the first-ever true, turn-by-turn GPS app for the iPhone.

TomTom: iPhone GPS app and car accessory kit

Of the many apps demonstrated at Apple's WWDC keynote, the most prominent was TomTom's GPS app.

The company's Peter-Frans Pauwels announced that his firm would have new navigation software this summer that takes advantage of iPhone OS 3.0's support for true, turn-by-turn directions; the app will have both nation-specific and international maps from TomTom itself, work in either landscape or portrait modes, and voice out directions.

An accessory kit will also showcase 3.0's support for more than just basic accessories. It will act as a basic suction-cup mount for the dashboard or windshield but, additionally, will amplify the GPS signal, support both hands-free calling and music through the stereo system, and charge the iPhone from the car's 12-volt port.





AirStrip Technologies: AirStrip CC

While support for medical accessories is nothing new, AirStrip is promising something much more with its AirStrip CC (Critical Care) app.

Dr. Cameron Powell's demonstration showed that the app can take live sensor data and feed it to the iPhone over the Internet in real-time, giving them access to data even when they're not at the hospital. The touchscreen lets doctors measure out critical statistics, like the distance between unusual heartbeats, by tapping two points.



The background push notification system in iPhone OS 3.0 means that health care experts of any kind also don't have to keep checking the app in case of an emergency or an unusual lab test; if data exceeds certain conditions, the app can flash an alert even when it's closed.

Line 6/Planet Waves' guitar and amp controls

Appealing to musicians, Line 6/Planet Waves has developed an app that will allow an iPhone to modify the output of a guitar or its amplifier through an accessory. Over 80 real and virtual amp styles can be simulated, and the new app can (much like GarageBand) alter the type of guitar heard; an electric 6-string guitar can be tweaked to produce a 12-string acoustic sound, for example.

Tilting the iPhone on its side switches to a view of knobs that can fine-tune the characteristics of the sound, including its stage presence.



Notably, the company's presenters encountered problems getting the accessory and software to work perfectly together and thus suggested that they may be some time away from being completely ready.

Zipcar's rental app

Particularly relevant for those in major cities like Chicago, San Francisco and others where Zipcar is prevalent, the company's self-titled app was Apple's centerpiece example for the ability to embed the Google Maps framework in a third-party app.

In his run-through, Luke Schneider of Zipcar showed the app locating every available Zipcar on a Google map, either nearby the owner (using GPS) or manually specified areas. They can then see which cars are available in a given area, down to the specific model and cost, and reserve those cars directly from the phone.

Importantly, iPhone owners won't even have to worry as much about keys or remembering which car is theirs. Thanks to the app, customers can unlock their cars remotely or honk the car's horn to identify it if more than one is nearby.



Images kindly provided by Electronista.

Its taken a while for TOMTOM to come up with something. how much we have to pay? will there be cost to data transmission? will traffic report be included? Speed camera alert? Bloody hell TOMTOM get your act together...

i will stick to my GARMIN and UNIDEN for car GPS and wait for Apple to come up with proper Car GPS. Until them TOMTOM clear the space..
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post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro View Post

Its taken a while for TOMTOM to come up with something. how much we have to pay? will there be cost to data transmission? will traffic report be included? Speed camera alert? Bloody hell TOMTOM get your act together...

i will stick to my GARMIN and UNIDEN for car GPS and wait for Apple to come up with proper Car GPS. Until them TOMTOM clear the space..

The issue wasn't with Tom Tom, the issue was with Apple allowing it for legal reasons.
post #5 of 25
so i wonder how long until the Apple Stores get some kind of attachment to use a frikking touch for that handheld credit card pay gig of theirs. it's a tad embarrassing that they are using something that runs off Windows CE

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #6 of 25
These are all pretty amazing. The Zipit App reminds me of the mobile phone controlled car from Tomorrow Never Dies.

I'm glad that Apple has given innovative companies both the capabilities and the market to unseat business rivals that do nothing but stifle progress in their field.

It makes me want to go out and write pharmacy dispensing software for macs so I don't have to use windows software for anything.
post #7 of 25
TomTom and ZipCar catch my interest. I will try out Zipcar as soon as I'm in a city with them.

I had hoped to see more attachments. I'd guess the D-pad attachment demo will come with the next iPod demo this September.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro View Post

Its taken a while for TOMTOM to come up with something. how much we have to pay? will there be cost to data transmission? will traffic report be included? Speed camera alert? Bloody hell TOMTOM get your act together...

i will stick to my GARMIN and UNIDEN for car GPS and wait for Apple to come up with proper Car GPS. Until them TOMTOM clear the space..

So much hate and so much unneccary quoting. I wouldn't expect the costs to be lower than a standalone GPS. Afterall, they have to pay for the 30-pin connector license fees and still try to turn a similar profit with only the SW and accessories. This will be the same with all GPS device companies making a move to the iPhone.

I wish they offered a larger speaker on the attachment and an option to FM or dirct connect to car stereo for audio playback and in-car speaker directions neatly overlaid audio. I also hope that their will be a way to use it as a handsfree phone while still in the app, but that make require a new API.
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post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

so i wonder how long until the Apple Stores get some kind of attachment to use a frikking touch for that handheld credit card pay gig of theirs. it's a tad embarrassing that they are using something that runs off Windows CE

I wouldn't call it embarrasing considering that Apple doesn't make a portable PoS system, but I imagine that it will be sometime this year and Apple will gladly use their own tech once the attachment is available and tested.

Will it be a startup or a major company like Motorola Symbol that will first produce it.
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post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

The issue wasn't with Tom Tom, the issue was with Apple allowing it for legal reasons.

Please elaborate...what is the legal reason? i have bought traffic related appas in the australian store which given the limitation on data transmission done a pretty good job. also used a turn-by-turn app on a iphone 3g using the google maps.. (please note the phone was jailbroken to try out this app) it worked quite well.

i dont know how TOMTOM is in ur part of the world, my experience with TOMTOM in australia has been bad. unless Apple makes TOMTOM to comply with proper quality control TOMTOM will not produce quality and moneys worth. i emphasize the word" Quality".

i know the rebuttal... """"the product is going to be on Apps store so i have a choice of not buying""" well i am not buying it... i will not prostitute out my "Quality Gizmo" for a rubbish...

sorry about the rant...

it is almost bad as VISTA on a MAC
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post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

so i wonder how long until the Apple Stores get some kind of attachment to use a frikking touch for that handheld credit card pay gig of theirs. it's a tad embarrassing that they are using something that runs off Windows CE

Why? It's a Windows world- no worries. I use Windows during the day and Mac at night? When you go to an ATM - do you think it runs on OSX?
post #11 of 25
Good point, wish it was the norm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Why? It's a Windows world- no worries. I use Windows during the day and Mac at night? When you go to an ATM - do you think it runs on OSX?
post #12 of 25
So if TomTom releases an app, will that push the existing turn-by-turn app "G-Map" (which is US only I think) to add more features?

G-Map is actually quite good, and it was only $20. If TomTom is significantly more than that I could see a handy price war developing... which would be nice for the consumer.
post #13 of 25
@nitro - can u edit the post above so youre not quoting the entire article please?

as far as tthese apps go, i say they are pretty cool. th 3gs might not be a s major of a leap as we thought, but with the added network speed apps can rely more heavily on data transfer and delver some impressive shit

still not worth it for me to pay 200 etf at sprint for it though. definitely am looking forward to next year when my contract expires. im feeling a little gay for apple right now... weird
post #14 of 25
While Apple was late to the party on some of this stuff, the sheer quality of the implementation of it, yet again, will distance the iPhone from its competition. For a lot of us, that's the way we like it.

Most of the condescending geeks and assorted complainers, who are primarily about getting Apple to push the envelope on the glitz and newness fronts, just cannot get this.

Fortunately, there is a sizeable market of the former types, and it suits us just fine.
post #15 of 25
The apps in health-management is what I really found impressive. Having a truly portable system that can forward real-time patient vitals is just a start. Ambulances, home-health-care providers, etc.. An individual who really wants to monitor their vitals (such as athletes) now will have that option. If it is beyond the concept phase, some of these ideas (or ideas born thereafter) are really going to shake the industry. Way to go Apple!
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro View Post

Please elaborate...what is the legal reason? i have bought traffic related appas in the australian store which given the limitation on data transmission done a pretty good job. also used a turn-by-turn app on a iphone 3g using the google maps.. (please note the phone was jailbroken to try out this app) it worked quite well.

The issue was Apple couldn't legally be responsible for accidents caused by GPS. Apple's contracts over 2.0 software didn't remove liability from Apple over accidents caused by software released from the app store. When those contracts were written and accepted by users, the software in Core Location didn't produce heading directions, thus couldn't support turn-by-turn navigation. When this did come, contracts had been agreed to over the software that didn't allow it because Apple had previously disallowed the apps over 2.0, and that was written into numerous contracts with developers (store and SDK legal agreements) and with consumers.

Thus, when Apple became able to allow this type of software, they couldn't for legal reasons. They could be liable for accidents etc.

With 3.0, they need new legal agreements anyway, so its all now written in and the software has been tested for reliability and stability to that level.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro View Post

i dont know how TOMTOM is in ur part of the world, my experience with TOMTOM in australia has been bad. unless Apple makes TOMTOM to comply with proper quality control TOMTOM will not produce quality and moneys worth. i emphasize the word" Quality".

it is almost bad as VISTA on a MAC

Are you referring to the SW-only, or the standalone TOMTOM navigators? If you're referring to the standalone navigators, in Europe at least they beat the likes of Garmin and others quite consistently in reviews. That's been proven in numerous reviews and comparisons. And I nor my friends have not had any issues with quality of their SW or HW in their standalone products (that run linux).

It really seems to be the usability that always wins with TOMTOM. Their standalone products have all kinds of handy addon features (emergency help, traffic info, real hands-free phonebook&phone access over bluetooth etcetc.) that also help and often go beyond what others offer. GPS and map accuracy seems to be good enough with all mentioned products.

I have a pretty old one (4 years) and it's still very usable. I guess the usability makes a difference much like the iPhone vs. the competition (which seems to be catching up?).

Regs, Jarkko
post #18 of 25
The capabilities of the TomTom accessory seem nice even before adding the TomTom GPS application. I like the look of it compared to other iPhone car accessories and I'm looking for something like that, so I'd probably buy it even if I don't end up buying the application (assuming they don't prevent that somehow).

I don't see why I wouldn't end up buying the application too though because I do want a turn-by-turn directions application. Maybe if the competition gets something out before I get around to buying it. I wouldn't expect it to cost as much as a stand-alone GPS device though. They do probably want to make close to the same amount, but that can still happen if they subtract the hardware part of the cost since they're not including a device for the iPhone version.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro;1428813
"TOMTOM come up with something good OR get lost"



Its taken a while for TOMTOM to come up with something. how much we have to pay? will there be cost to data transmission? will traffic report be included? Speed camera alert? Bloody hell TOMTOM get your act together...

i will stick to my GARMIN and UNIDEN for car GPS and wait for Apple to come up with proper Car GPS. Until them TOMTOM clear the space..

I suspect TomTom would be the LAST people to get lost. Perhaps you could suggest they miss a turn and drive into the drink?
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post #20 of 25
I love the musical instrument and car rental apps, they look really cool and offer a great value for those in the music business or using this Zip car rental service. Aspecially with this musical instrument app it looks like the iPhone is about to enter the music business to replace or complement lots of hard- and software there.
post #21 of 25
Quite certain the TomTom accessory does NOT enhance the GPS signal but rather just optimizes the phone's location to the sky.

Mike
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dequardo View Post

Quite certain the TomTom accessory does NOT enhance the GPS signal but rather just optimizes the phone's location to the sky.

Mike

I was assuming an antenna that the 30-pin connector API can use to get better reception for the GPS.
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post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

so i wonder how long until the Apple Stores get some kind of attachment to use a frikking touch for that handheld credit card pay gig of theirs. it's a tad embarrassing that they are using something that runs off Windows CE

probably frikking sooner than you think:

apple to ditch easypay systems
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post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitro View Post

Its taken a while for TOMTOM to come up with something. how much we have to pay? will there be cost to data transmission? will traffic report be included? Speed camera alert? Bloody hell TOMTOM get your act together...

i will stick to my GARMIN and UNIDEN for car GPS and wait for Apple to come up with proper Car GPS. Until them TOMTOM clear the space..

I sort of disagree, I say make the app $1 and let me buy just what I want, all I really need is maps and POIs for Indiana Il, Oh, Ky and Mi...so let me buy each state map for like $2-$4, let me buy seprate plugins for traffic, red light cams, and such.
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post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

I sort of disagree, I say make the app $1 and let me buy just what I want, all I really need is maps and POIs for Indiana Il, Oh, Ky and Mi...so let me buy each state map for like $2-$4, let me buy seprate plugins for traffic, red light cams, and such.

I get the idea that this is exactly why they waited. With 3.0 allowing in-app purchases, they can sell you maps and other updates on the fly. With 2.x they would have had to sell you distinct apps for every single feature or map that you wanted to buy. Far too cumbersome.

I have no idea what their pricing structure will be nor if the docking accessory will be required. But, either way, I think the app should be $1. The accessory should not be overly expensive. Maps, POI and traffic are where they will make their money, so why gouge us for the required components (app and maybe dock accessory). At they same time, I hope they don't make the maps etc overly expensive. They should consider that RIM just bought a navigation company and that other companies will release TBT nav apps for the iPhone too. If they want to be a major player on the SmartPhone navigation market, they will will have to drive adoption with fair pricing.

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