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iPhone 3G S faster than Palm Pre; 500K sales "conservative" - Page 3

post #81 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by legend79 View Post

More importantly to me... If you want to multitask; you go Pre. You want games; you go iPhone.

Well seeing as many people aren't willing to switch to Sprint for this so called 3rd part multitasking on a small screen, I say most people don't really give a damn. Apple has sold 40 million plus devices without 3rd party multitasking so it's not as big a deal as most of you want us to believe.
post #82 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It went on sale June 5th with the full release on the 6th.

I put in the "most likely" because technically Palm can record sales when the carrier (Sprint) received its Pres, which could've happened before May 31st (though I doubt it).
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post #83 of 367
its becoming more and more evident that its the OS that really matters then the apps
palm pre take over bait by company that needs a real OS, i suggest Nokia which is having its
clocked cleaned and needs to return some momentum
RIM has an OS, MS has an OS, moto gave up so who else would MOST benefit from
the pre webOS? i say nokia
palm doesn't have the money or resources to rebuild the pre its getting the rep for cheap
and expensive, nokia could use its quality mark and infuse new life into their line
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post #84 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I enjoyed peaking at your bookmarks and trying to figure out what some of them are. You still use LiveJournal? As for your Google search, were you looking up the movie Rom-Com?

I suppose I did put that out there. There are a few friends I have from the livejournal heyday who still use it. so it keeps me in touch with them.

And as for the rom-com...I was doing a wine tasting not even a block away from where they were shooting the film. So I had everybody asking me what was going on as if i would have some idea. there was a jack and a paul rudd sighting so i googled it to try and find the name of the movie. which hasn't been announced yet. so a bit of a fruitless effort.
post #85 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

Is there a person who wants 50000 applications..? Me, I'd be happy with 5-10 good ones.

Strange how no one remembers iPhone didn't have 50000 applications when first released, and still managed to beat Palm Treo line that did have numerous applications - and some of them very useful.

iPhone has 50000 apps because it was selling so well without apps that platform eventually became interesting for developers. I think same rules will work for any other device. Good phone will sell itself initially, and additional apps will bring more functionality and keep it actual down the time line.

The point is the iphone has brought focus onto apps. Many people now want applications on their phones, it may seem unimportant to you but to all those people downloading apps, it benefits them. I was recently in the Apple store and an an old lady came in there about help downloading apps onto her iphone. It put a smile on my face.
post #86 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The Pre is *still* takeover bait. In light of what the iPhone continues to bring to the table, the pre is nothing special.

Palm is no innovator in handheld devices, anyway.That title goes to Apple, who introduced the PDA to the world with Newton. Palm is a derivative company; a follower, not an innovator. If Palm is a pioneer at anything, it's in sitting around on its collective ass, resting on its laurels, milking/screwing its cusotmers, and then running around in a too-late frenzy like a chicken after Apple lopped off its head.

Which sounds very much like another, much larger company that can't seem to get its act together.

Too little, too late.

Gotta disagree with you, at one time Palm WAS the PDA market. Their innovations such as getting handwriting to work let Palm succceed where Apple failed. The Treo line set a new standard for smart phones and again they owned the market for several years. The problem was they stopped the innovation no thanks to one terrible decision after another from their management team. More attenion was made to what the company's name was and the logo instead of the product. I'm glad to see they are back, this will keep the pressure on Apple to innovate. As consumers we win!
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post #87 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yeah, it's a theme in the tech site comments and elsewhere that works the old "Apple makes shiny toys for stupid people" meme, which never seems to really die no matter how much reality moves on.

Apparently all those apps aren't really anything to be impressed by, because most of them are fart apps or games and the iPhone is one big playpen for trendy teens 'n posers.

When you're ready to get "real work done" you'll of course reach for a WinMo, eh, Blackberry, eh, Android, eh, Pre!

I'm actually very interested in the psychology of "easy to use" equals "not serious." It's been a hallmark of anti-Apple sentiment since before I can remember. There was also a corollary notion, that "caring about the fit, finish and look of the user experience" equaled "vapid and shallow", but that has receded as MS and other have taken to tricking out their efforts with bling.
Back in Windows 3 days, it was taken as a truism that real computer users welcomed eye searingly ugly as proof that no valuable resources were being wasted on design.

Of course, back in those days "lot of game titles available" was also evidence of a superior platform, so I guess consistency isn't the long suit of the inveterate Apple basher.

You are on to something here. I'm visually impaired, and I encountered resistant advice to getting a Mac instead of a computer with Windows installed. But, I was aware of the reputation of Mac OS X, and Apple's prowess in product design.

With respect to the iPhone 3G S, I am impressed with the hardware power in combination with the iPhone 3.0 OS. Beginning with the iPhone 3G S, VoiceOver, Zoom, white-on-black, Voice Control, and multi-lingual support is now available. Plus, an API to support hardware attachments.

For some of us in the visually impaired community, the iPhone 3G S is going to be the start of a "wonderful friendship". I do not have an iPhone now, but I know having an iPhone 3G S is doable for me.

Nullis in verba -- "on the word of no one"

 

 

 

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post #88 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post

If you want to get caught up in the "which phone/service is better" then the ONLY competitor is the Crackberry (aka Blackberry from RIM).

8.7M sold in the last quarter.
Big number.
Better than the iPhone.

Android and Prē, not so much.

If you look worldwide, Nokia still sells more "smartphones" or "converged devices" then BB. They sold 13.7m, of which 5m were N-series and over 3m were E-series.

At some point, this category is going to need to be subdivided once again, because iPhone and even the Pre, G1, and N97, are really in a separate class from most of the other "smartphones." But I'm not really sure what criteria should be used to subdivide.
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post #89 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2005 View Post

I put in the "most likely" because technically Palm can record sales when the carrier (Sprint) received its Pres, which could've happened before May 31st (though I doubt it).

Good call. I hadnt thought of that.
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post #90 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post

If you want to get caught up in the "which phone/service is better" then the ONLY competitor is the Crackberry (aka Blackberry from RIM).

8.7M sold in the last quarter.
Big number.
Better than the iPhone.

Android and Prē, not so much.

Actually 7.8
post #91 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adjei View Post

Actually 7.8

Chastized, I am.
post #92 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfyearsun View Post

On another note, I found it amusing how hard the pre is being advertised on appleinsider

That page is probably most of Sprint's advertising budget right there...
post #93 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajectory View Post

I think Palm's biggest problem is the name: Pre. What the hell does it mean? It's just stupid. Pre-what? What will the next phone be called, Post? Pri?

Premature!
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post #94 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adjei View Post

Actually 7.8

Yes and did anyone bother to check out the sales breakdown?
post #95 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by donlphi View Post

I don't want to take away from your comment, as I think it's a true statement, but I am really curious about what everybody wants to multitask.

maybe you weren't around during the Mac Plus days, but once you have real robust multitasking you will never go back. It just allows for an ease of use you can't get by any other method.
Quote:

I can only think of a couple but I don't see a "super necessity" for it:

that sort of logic can be extended to smart phones themselves. Are they even a nessecity, many would say no.

On iPhone it is however a necessity as Apple uses multitasking in a privledged manner. The problem is the lack of user app multitasking.
Quote:

Listen to Pandora (some other radio app) while doing something else (checking e-mail, browsing the web, etc.).

I have a number of radio apps installed and honestly use them very little. But that is me, I just don't listen to the radio much at all. I can think of a number of good ideas that ideally would have multitasking support available to them. Some examples;
1. A GPS tracking app. That collect your position every five minutes or so.
2. Health monitoring. Great for workouts, just slap a bluetooth patch on your body some place to capture heart rate and other info.
3. execise equipment monitoring. Log your performance, distance traveled, intensity and so forth for bike riders and other outdoor activities. Apparently Apple has something up it's sleeves here.
4. Communications with lab instruments / meters. The classic usage here is to monitor a temp at a fixed rate. That could be minutes or hours, the idea being to collect for later processing.
5. Document creation from multiple types of data, each piece created via it's own app. The classic example being a spread sheet with embedded art.
6. Automatic position notification. An app sends a predefined txt to someone based on their approximate location.
7. It would be incredibly nice to be able to flip between the app of your choice and the calculator of your choice without the program reloads. This is especially useful for programmable caculators with advanced features. In fact the idea of a caculator is so useful that it ought to be always running.
8. It is very useful to have mail and the web browser running at the same time. Especially when so much E-Mail these days comes with links for the web browser to open. Again this just eliminates the open and close cycles. The thing is on a bad day you may haveten or twenty E-Mails with links to follow.
9. Apps and media dowloads in background. Why should you have to sit in an app waiting for a movie to download. Do it in background! WiFi or cell I don't care, the idea is to do something useful while your purchase downloads.
10. Better stop watch apps
11. Audio logging. Say you are at a lecture and you want to record it, a back ground app could keep on recording no matter what else the iPhone was doing. This sort of feature could be useful for reporters trying to cover a story while other things are going on requiring the iPhone. Big market here if the right optimized microphone can be had.

Those are just a few things that don't involve listening to radio.
Quote:

How many other things can you do at the same time on a phone?

As long as there is an SDK and support for Multitasking that question can not be answered. The issue is the biomass behind the XCode window trying to implement his new idea. As long as the platform is viable there will be new apps some of which will run in background.

Also I have to say the issue that is always brought up about battery life is BS. The user of the iPhone is intelligent enough to avoid battery draining apps when required.


Dave
post #96 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by legend79 View Post

Course you know that Palm INVENTED the touch screen with their Palm Pilots and owns all patents related to single-touch. Check your dates buddy.

Wow 22nd post and you couldn't be further off, PALM used newtons technology for handwriting, they just paid apple to license it. So you make a statement, calling someone else out, yet you are clueless. KK you can probably leave now.
post #97 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Preciously speaking, Palm presumed that if they made a preemptive presence before the preliminary 2009 iPhone preamble they would have a pretty precious lead, but they pre-released the Pre before it was a real predator which prevented the Pre from prevailing despite Palms McNamee presumptuous preaching of the iPhones predoom and the Pres preeminence.

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post #98 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

maybe you weren't around during the Mac Plus days, but once you have real robust multitasking you will never go back. It just allows for an ease of use you can't get by any other method.

On iPhone it is however a necessity as Apple uses multitasking in a privledged manner. The problem is the lack of user app multitasking.

Also I have to say the issue that is always brought up about battery life is BS. The user of the iPhone is intelligent enough to avoid battery draining apps when required.


Dave

Comparing the iPhone's single-tasking with the Mac Plus is not valid. The Mac Plus was single tasking because that's all it was capable of! The iPhone is single-tasking (at the user level), because Apple disagrees with you about battery draining. These are completely different reasons for single-tasking. Back in the 80's, Apple was hamstrung if you will, working from a position of weakness, whereas today they're in a position of strength.

It's perfectly okay that people like you disagree with them about both the importance of user-level multi-tasking as well as the drawbacks of rapid battery usage. I hope you purchase and get a lot of multi-tasking use out of one of the competing products. But don't kid yourself for a second and think that Apple designed the iPhone as single-tasking because of any weakness on their part. They did it because they think you're wrong on both counts.
post #99 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Y
Back in Windows 3 days, it was taken as a truism that real computer users welcomed eye searingly ugly as proof that no valuable resources were being wasted on design.

LOL... Absolute best description of Win 3 I ever read/
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post #100 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Multitasking is a good thing!

I think we all agree, but I think many of us feel that most apps dont need background apps to still be functional, even when offline, and that the way its implemented is very important. I dont think WebOS, Android or WinMo are doing it correctly for end users or developers.

Quote:
On iPhone it is however a necessity as Apple uses multitasking in a privledged manner. The problem is the lack of user app multitasking.

I have a number of radio apps installed and honestly use them very little. But that is me, I just don't listen to the radio much at all. I can think of a number of good ideas that ideally would have multitasking support available to them. Some examples;
1. A GPS tracking app. That collect your position every five minutes or so.
2. Health monitoring. Great for workouts, just slap a bluetooth patch on your body some place to capture heart rate and other info.
3. execise equipment monitoring. Log your performance, distance traveled, intensity and so forth for bike riders and other outdoor activities. Apparently Apple has something up it's sleeves here.
4. Communications with lab instruments / meters. The classic usage here is to monitor a temp at a fixed rate. That could be minutes or hours, the idea being to collect for later processing.
5. Document creation from multiple types of data, each piece created via it's own app. The classic example being a spread sheet with embedded art.
6. Automatic position notification. An app sends a predefined txt to someone based on their approximate location.
7. It would be incredibly nice to be able to flip between the app of your choice and the calculator of your choice without the program reloads. This is especially useful for programmable caculators with advanced features. In fact the idea of a caculator is so useful that it ought to be always running.
8. It is very useful to have mail and the web browser running at the same time. Especially when so much E-Mail these days comes with links for the web browser to open. Again this just eliminates the open and close cycles. The thing is on a bad day you may haveten or twenty E-Mails with links to follow.
9. Apps and media dowloads in background. Why should you have to sit in an app waiting for a movie to download. Do it in background! WiFi or cell I don't care, the idea is to do something useful while your purchase downloads.
10. Better stop watch apps
11. Audio logging. Say you are at a lecture and you want to record it, a back ground app could keep on recording no matter what else the iPhone was doing. This sort of feature could be useful for reporters trying to cover a story while other things are going on requiring the iPhone. Big market here if the right optimized microphone can be had.

Those are just a few things that don't involve listening to radio.

Excellent list!

Quote:
As long as there is an SDK and support for Multitasking that question can not be answered. The issue is the biomass behind the XCode window trying to implement his new idea. As long as the platform is viable there will be new apps some of which will run in background.

For that reason I think Apple is working on background apps. I support their decision not to include it with the previous two models as CPU and RAM just arent good enough, but that limitation seems to have vanished as of today.

Quote:
Also I have to say the issue that is always brought up about battery life is BS. The user of the iPhone is intelligent enough to avoid battery draining apps when required.

I dont think its BS, but its certainly not the most prominent issue. I dont think that we should automatically assume the user of a consumer device is tech savvy. With a device like the iPhone I think its important for Apple to work out the logistics of how backgrounds apps run and not jsut let them loose until the RAM is filled.

For example, Apple could allow for 2 apps to run in the background, but only apps that meet RAM, CPU and internet bandwidth guidelines. This would help maintain the usability of your foreground app and help developers since they know the maximum damage the background apps could inflict on the system at large.

This could be turned on via the Settings » Background Apps where apps that have met the requirements by app are listed and where you get to toggle On the apps you wish to allow. This may include the iPod app as it does seem to take a toll on the system, at least with the first two iPhones.

Two know which iPhones are running in the background the Menu Bar could have a small icon to the left of the battery indictor or other icons on that side denoting a [B} for background apps running. Or a small icon of the app that is running in the background, though that may be too small to represent. The icon on the Home Page that is set for background app running could get a special badge or have the icon change slightly but noticeably so its easy to see.

But how would you kill the app if you no longer wanted it to run in the background? Would you have to go into settings to toggle it to Off?

Just some ideas, that was off the top of my head for how Apple could do it safely for their less-than-technical crowd. Id love to hear some better examples.
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post #101 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

Wanting to take signal strength out of the equation idealizes the situation, which just doesn't make much sense.

On the contrary! It makes total sense to make sure that the signal strength is the same for both phones.

If the Sprint signal was stronger (which seems to be suggested by the one iPhone going to Edge) then how can you determine which one is faster? The answer is you can't.
post #102 of 367
post #103 of 367
Palm is selling the Pre to a market where the iPhone is not available - Sprint customers. Depending on when their exclusive contract with Sprint ends, Palm could sell the product to VZ. Together these CDMA networks have more customers than ATT. Many prospective smartphone customers can not change carriers because of corporate plans, family plans, and particular coverage issues depend on where they live.

Anyway, it is not big deal for Palm to have different radios for the Pre, including GSM/EDGE, UMTS/3G, besides CDMA/EVO. It is a question of flexibility on the part of Palm to adapt. With one foot in the grave, I suspect Palm will be very flexible. That would include cutting prices. That thing needs to be priced at $99 with dirt cheap data plans.

Strategically, Palm needs to come out with SDK, like yesterday. Plus develop their own equivalent of iTunes. The hardware needs to be refined including battery life and bulk. The people running the company are ex-Apple and they are young, hungry and talented. In direct competition, Palm would need disruptive technology to compete, or else they would be dead meat... no different that Hannibal challenging the power of Rome. As long as they got the moat that Apple is willing to cross in selling to all carriers, Palm may survive, but it is a race against time and their cash burn rate.
post #104 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

maybe you weren't around during the Mac Plus days, but once you have real robust multitasking you will never go back. It just allows for an ease of use you can't get by any other method.

Sure, but there's one huge difference between multitasking on a computer and multitasking on a phone: screen real estate.

Multitasking on a computer involves having multiple open windows, dragging files between them, looking at several windows simultaneously, etc.

The tiny screen of a phone means that there will only ever be one user facing app at a time, with some type of notifications taking the place of open windows for other running apps.

Which means that you can replicate a lot of the "feel" of actual multitasking by making app switching as fast as possible, saving states, and using push notifications-- all of which Apple has done.

I'm not saying these techniques completely replace having multiple running background apps-- just that "real" multitasking isn't anything like the win it is on a desktop system.
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post #105 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adjei View Post

Actually 7.8

Only 3.8 activation. Guess that buy one get one free, were free was for existing customers. Really should take out that buy one get one free to the equation.
post #106 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by masklinn View Post

Apple Newton, released in 1993, touchscreen (stylus) with (very bad) handwriting recognition.
Palm Pilot 1000, released in March 1996

Sorry to say, you're wrong.

Correct-I have a Newton 100 filed somewhere, it recognized my handwriting-especially using Graffiti, like on an EasyPay. I read e-books on it and kept my Day-Timer stuff there. It could have evolved into something very useful, like handheld order devices in restaurants.
post #107 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockky View Post

Yeah, I love my Iphone 3G S....but these speed figures are far from the truth.
I had the pre for 10 days and can tell you it downloaded 5-6 sites I regularly use on wifi...significantly faster than this phone does right now....by a lot...and consistantly!
And the efficiency of navigation on that device is industry leading at this point.
The universal search is TRULY, universal for example...includes bookmarks, and message content. You can, on any page just start typing letters and be prompted to google searches, or urls...it's great.
The whole package is, unfortunately just not Iphone..but they've taken what was Iphone's ace in the whole: Interface elegance...and eaten Apples lunch.

That's interesting, because all the reviews on the Pre that I've read, and that's a lot, say that the Pre missed with their search because it DOESN'T search everything on the phone, but rather does good search on the internet.

The iPhone search however, while it doesn't bother with the internet, does a much better job of searching the phone itself, including to body of e-mails if you include "all".

Are you sure you've actually used the Pre and the iPhone?

From Engadgets review of the Pre:

Quote:
The first thing you should know about the Pre's Universal Search is that it isn't really all that universal. From the card view or launcher, the find-as-you-type engine allows you to look up contacts, applications, and if all else fails, take your query to the web via Google, Google Maps, Wikipedia, and Twitter Search. What it doesn't do, however, is let you search any actual content on your device, like a mail message, an SMS, or a document. In that sense, the term "universal" is somewhat misleading, though we'll give Palm props for making it work as quickly and painlessly as it does. We're going to call it out right now: Palm needs to extend this feature to mail at the very least -- we're happy that we can jump quickly to a contact or internet search (really really happy), but we've honestly gotten pretty used to iPhone OS 3.0's broad searches.
post #108 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnp1 View Post

Correct-I have a Newton 100 filed somewhere, it recognized my handwriting-especially using Graffiti, like on an EasyPay. I read e-books on it and kept my Day-Timer stuff there. It could have evolved into something very useful, like handheld order devices in restaurants.

I have a 120. The handwriting was improved. I even had a PCMCIA card for faxing with it. It still works. I finally have it boxed away. That was a device way ahead of it's time.
post #109 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoneFrenzy View Post

iPhone still can't Multi-Task but overall it's a decent phone too.

http://www.precentral.net/palm-pre-v...wser-head-head

The iPhone DOES multitask, it just doesn't allow third party programs to do so without Apple's approval, which is apparently very hard to get.
post #110 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2005 View Post

When Palm's quarterly results come out on June 25th, it will be for their quarter ending May 31st (or so), so there will most likely be no Pre sales included in the numbers. So it will definitely be dismal, but that is what's expected. So Palm could have a reprieve for one more quarter, and hopefully by Sept, they'll have announced or released a second phone.

But they could surprise next week by giving some insight into how the Pre is selling on the conference call, but given that Apple is likely to announce a 3G S sales milestone before then, anything Palm says will look very very small.

I'm also curious as to how they will add Pre sales to their books. Will they add the sales up front, or will they break them down over a 24 month period as Apple does?
post #111 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOFEER View Post

its becoming more and more evident that its the OS that really matters then the apps
palm pre take over bait by company that needs a real OS, i suggest Nokia which is having its
clocked cleaned and needs to return some momentum
RIM has an OS, MS has an OS, moto gave up so who else would MOST benefit from
the pre webOS? i say nokia
palm doesn't have the money or resources to rebuild the pre its getting the rep for cheap
and expensive, nokia could use its quality mark and infuse new life into their line

Yes , But its the OS that allows the apps to exist and thrive.
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post #112 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I do agree with that bloggers preference for sliding cards. I wish Safari would allow that option.

I've read a number of opinions about the "cards" metaphore. Most reviewers seem to like it, but a couple pointed out that it's not obvious as to how the system works, and that the iPhones' method is much easier to figure out.

As I haven't seen a Pre yet, I find this to be an interesting point.
post #113 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post

If you want to get caught up in the "which phone/service is better" then the ONLY competitor is the Crackberry (aka Blackberry from RIM).

8.7M sold in the last quarter.
Big number.
Better than the iPhone.

Android and Prē, not so much.

7.8 million sold.

Less than expected. Less new subscribers as well.
post #114 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

maybe you weren't around during the Mac Plus days, but once you have real robust multitasking you will never go back. It just allows for an ease of use you can't get by any other method.

that sort of logic can be extended to smart phones themselves. Are they even a nessecity, many would say no.

On iPhone it is however a necessity as Apple uses multitasking in a privledged manner. The problem is the lack of user app multitasking.

I have a number of radio apps installed and honestly use them very little. But that is me, I just don't listen to the radio much at all. I can think of a number of good ideas that ideally would have multitasking support available to them. Some examples;
1. A GPS tracking app. That collect your position every five minutes or so.
2. Health monitoring. Great for workouts, just slap a bluetooth patch on your body some place to capture heart rate and other info.
3. execise equipment monitoring. Log your performance, distance traveled, intensity and so forth for bike riders and other outdoor activities. Apparently Apple has something up it's sleeves here.
4. Communications with lab instruments / meters. The classic usage here is to monitor a temp at a fixed rate. That could be minutes or hours, the idea being to collect for later processing.
5. Document creation from multiple types of data, each piece created via it's own app. The classic example being a spread sheet with embedded art.
6. Automatic position notification. An app sends a predefined txt to someone based on their approximate location.
7. It would be incredibly nice to be able to flip between the app of your choice and the calculator of your choice without the program reloads. This is especially useful for programmable caculators with advanced features. In fact the idea of a caculator is so useful that it ought to be always running.
8. It is very useful to have mail and the web browser running at the same time. Especially when so much E-Mail these days comes with links for the web browser to open. Again this just eliminates the open and close cycles. The thing is on a bad day you may haveten or twenty E-Mails with links to follow.
9. Apps and media dowloads in background. Why should you have to sit in an app waiting for a movie to download. Do it in background! WiFi or cell I don't care, the idea is to do something useful while your purchase downloads.
10. Better stop watch apps
11. Audio logging. Say you are at a lecture and you want to record it, a back ground app could keep on recording no matter what else the iPhone was doing. This sort of feature could be useful for reporters trying to cover a story while other things are going on requiring the iPhone. Big market here if the right optimized microphone can be had.

Those are just a few things that don't involve listening to radio.


As long as there is an SDK and support for Multitasking that question can not be answered. The issue is the biomass behind the XCode window trying to implement his new idea. As long as the platform is viable there will be new apps some of which will run in background.

Also I have to say the issue that is always brought up about battery life is BS. The user of the iPhone is intelligent enough to avoid battery draining apps when required.


Dave

One of the best iphone posts to date.
Who would have thought that a small device could do so much .

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #115 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucep View Post

One of the best iphone posts to date.
Who would have thought that as mall device could do so much .

9


Hey I got my PRE and it Rocks........oh, I should clarify---
I PRE-ordered the iPhone 3GS.........The Palm Pre was merely an old prototype of the iPhone that Steve Jobs trashed.......Rubenstein left Apple disgruntled....and CNN put it best:

"The Pre is great....but....its not insanely great" ...thats what happens when you take a protoype to market....Rubenstein should have listened to Jobs.....darn
post #116 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamIIGS View Post

Wow 22nd post and you couldn't be further off, PALM used newtons technology for handwriting, they just paid apple to license it. So you make a statement, calling someone else out, yet you are clueless. KK you can probably leave now.

hmm... wasn't palm the company that gave the newton 'graffiti' - a dumbed down but relatively easy to remember version of handwriting recognition, that was successful because apple's own full handwriting recognition had its initial problems? i seem to recall using graffiti on my first and second newton, but with the MP2000 apple had solved the issues and graffiti was no longer necessary... i think graffiti was also available on other platforms...
post #117 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The iPhone DOES multitask, it just doesn't allow third party programs to do so without Apple's approval, which is apparently very hard to get.

Being able to multitask with the wide variety of third party programs available for the pre is a major advantage.
post #118 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfyearsun View Post

Being able to multitask with the wide variety of third party programs available for the pre is a major advantage.

I can't quite tell if you're being sarcastic.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #119 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

maybe you weren't around during the Mac Plus days, but once you have real robust multitasking you will never go back. It just allows for an ease of use you can't get by any other method.

that sort of logic can be extended to smart phones themselves. Are they even a nessecity, many would say no.

On iPhone it is however a necessity as Apple uses multitasking in a privledged manner. The problem is the lack of user app multitasking.

I have a number of radio apps installed and honestly use them very little. But that is me, I just don't listen to the radio much at all. I can think of a number of good ideas that ideally would have multitasking support available to them. Some examples;
1. A GPS tracking app. That collect your position every five minutes or so.
2. Health monitoring. Great for workouts, just slap a bluetooth patch on your body some place to capture heart rate and other info.
3. execise equipment monitoring. Log your performance, distance traveled, intensity and so forth for bike riders and other outdoor activities. Apparently Apple has something up it's sleeves here.
4. Communications with lab instruments / meters. The classic usage here is to monitor a temp at a fixed rate. That could be minutes or hours, the idea being to collect for later processing.
5. Document creation from multiple types of data, each piece created via it's own app. The classic example being a spread sheet with embedded art.
6. Automatic position notification. An app sends a predefined txt to someone based on their approximate location.
7. It would be incredibly nice to be able to flip between the app of your choice and the calculator of your choice without the program reloads. This is especially useful for programmable caculators with advanced features. In fact the idea of a caculator is so useful that it ought to be always running.
8. It is very useful to have mail and the web browser running at the same time. Especially when so much E-Mail these days comes with links for the web browser to open. Again this just eliminates the open and close cycles. The thing is on a bad day you may haveten or twenty E-Mails with links to follow.
9. Apps and media dowloads in background. Why should you have to sit in an app waiting for a movie to download. Do it in background! WiFi or cell I don't care, the idea is to do something useful while your purchase downloads.
10. Better stop watch apps
11. Audio logging. Say you are at a lecture and you want to record it, a back ground app could keep on recording no matter what else the iPhone was doing. This sort of feature could be useful for reporters trying to cover a story while other things are going on requiring the iPhone. Big market here if the right optimized microphone can be had.

Those are just a few things that don't involve listening to radio.


As long as there is an SDK and support for Multitasking that question can not be answered. The issue is the biomass behind the XCode window trying to implement his new idea. As long as the platform is viable there will be new apps some of which will run in background.

Also I have to say the issue that is always brought up about battery life is BS. The user of the iPhone is intelligent enough to avoid battery draining apps when required.


Dave

11. Voice Memos in iPhone OS 3.0 run in the background.
post #120 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfyearsun View Post

Being able to multitask with the wide variety of third party programs available for the pre is a major advantage.

We'll have to see. There are so few programs available for the Pre right now, that's it's hard to tell what will happen as time goes by.

I've got 6.5 screens of apps on my 3G. Now it's true that many wouldn't benefit from multitasking, but what if five did it, ten, fifteen, twenty? What if I had no control over it? What if I wasn't aware that some were?

What about battery life?

While my 3G does pretty well there, and the 3Gs does even better, so that a battery that dies during the day isn't that usual, unless you use the phone like crazy, the Pre is said to require a changeable battery, as life is so poor.

Also, I've read reviews that say that running three apps or so in the background can, depending on the apps, cause music playback to stutter, and for video to break up, drop frames, or show digititus.

It's possible that multitasking works ok on the Pre, but not great. We probably won't know enough about it for most people until many more apps appear, which will take some time, according to this Palm post and thread;

http://pdnblog.palm.com/2009/06/an-u...m-and-the-sdk/
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