or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › 12% of early iPhone 3G buyers report ditching their BlackBerry
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

12% of early iPhone 3G buyers report ditching their BlackBerry - Page 2

post #41 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

quick question: do many people have difficulty using the iphones on-screen keyboard?

I can type just as fast on the iphone as I ever could on the blackberry, ...

Two co-workers in my (very small) building are in the process of switching from BBs to iPhones. The first person is using a 1 finger poke. It's painful to watch. I've suggested that he just start using his thumbs and his typing will improve (after all, he didn't go from 0-50wpm on his BB overnight).
post #42 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Not at all, I never lost a thumb wrestling match if that tells you anything. ...

In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
post #43 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You'll find that the numbers are about the same, and well within the margin of accuracy. I was merely trying to show that 12% isn't either 6% or 18%. If I knew you would be so picky, I would have used the other way of calculating it, which would have given almost the same exact answer, but is more confusing to most people.

I trust that ends this?

It will end it if you stop posting incorrect information.

Anant is correct and you are wrong, The numbers are not the same. You report that the range is 11.3 to 12.7. Anant's figure (8-16%) is correct, given a 4% margin of error.

Error margins are ABSOLUTE, not relative.

Let's take the extreme example. 100 people surveyed and 1 person choses item A. The margin of error is probably around 10% (I didn't bother to calculate it). By your analysis, the answer would always be 1% (actually 0.9 to 1.1%). In reality, with a 10% margin of error, it could be anywhere between 0% and 11%.

Please stop posting misinformation.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #44 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

The problem is that if you are in a meeting and your wag texts you, you have to look while you type as there is no point of reference. If you have a physical keyboard it is a lot easier to text without being a distraction in a meeting.

aha! hadn't thought of that.

so, what you need are little distinguishing marks on F and J keys which u can physically feel :-)

How about specs of dust carefully positioned under a protector screen?

-D
post #45 of 138
Shock. I've never seen a female having been carrying BB; never in my life.
Une autre culture...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #46 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

quick question: do many people have difficulty using the iphones on-screen keyboard? I [] find the auto-correction on iphone pretty good. but I keep hearing that for email, twitter etc a 'real' keyboard is far better than the iphone's solution.... with a little practice, and especially now with the landscape mode, typing can't be slower on iphone surely?
-D

I've never had any real problem with the virtual keyboard and agree that the auto-correction is pretty good. Landscape mode in more apps is a plus and typing apps like Typing Genius are very helpful for improving accuracy.

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #47 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

aha! hadn't thought of that.

so, what you need are little distinguishing marks on F and J keys which u can physically feel :-)

How about specs of dust carefully positioned under a protector screen?

-D

Not that it means anything statistically, but I've never seen anyone 'touch typing' on a phone keyboard. I always see BB (et al) users looking at their keyboard when they type.
"FJ" dimples make sense when you're statically positioning your hands poised over base keys on a full keyboard. I don't see where dimples (or frankly, even a physical keyboard) makes any great difference on a thumbs-typing device.
Tactile feedback may be another issue, but I still think its a matter of what you're used to, and that as time progresses, virtual keyboard will prevail because of its flexibility.
post #48 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

people [] with iPhones send much longer messages [] than people with other phones

That's definitely me!!

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #49 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Lets hope Apple does not fall victim to the same thing Motorola did with the RAZR.

Motorola made ONE nice phone. That was it.

The RAZR was/is ONLY a phone with a few extra features. It looked much nicer than the competition. The problem with motorola, is it was a one-shot/one-trick-pony. They had no ultimate plan to push the RAZR.

The iPhone is a PLATFORM and is SO much more than a mere phone, MORE than just nice looking hardware. It's the the OS, the software and the entire iTunes ecosystem. The phone aspect is almost secondary on some levels. Apple has a long term strategy. A strategy that I think we're just beginning to see unfold.

I can't wait until somebody writes "The iPod Story" sometime down the road!
Macintosh: It just WORKS!
Reply
Macintosh: It just WORKS!
Reply
post #50 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

I've never had any real problem with the virtual keyboard and agree that the auto-correction is pretty good. Landscape mode in more apps is a plus and typing apps like Typing Genius are very helpful for improving accuracy.

Is there a typing genius app for the iphone?

(I can't check app store right now, syncing is taking forever, i just bought the "Navigon Mobile Navigator Europe for iPhone" it's got rave reviews in the 3 days since release, it is about 2 GB of map data though, sync will take about hours i'm told.)
post #51 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It will end it if you stop posting incorrect information.

Anant is correct and you are wrong, The numbers are not the same. You report that the range is 11.3 to 12.7. Anant's figure (8-16%) is correct, given a 4% margin of error.

Error margins are ABSOLUTE, not relative.

Let's take the extreme example. 100 people surveyed and 1 person choses item A. The margin of error is probably around 10% (I didn't bother to calculate it). By your analysis, the answer would always be 1% (actually 0.9 to 1.1%). In reality, with a 10% margin of error, it could be anywhere between 0% and 11%.

Please stop posting misinformation.

So then, the one person who told you item "A", suddenly turns into 11 people? No, it doesn't work that way.
post #52 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Based on my personal observations I think this trend of eating into the Blackberry market is likely to continue.

Yeah, but that's just marketing talk. I can phrase the survey as --- despite RIM launches a couple of blackberries with well publicized firmware problems, their retention rate is still close to 90%.

It's not "eating" in the blackberry market when blackberries are growing faster than the iphone in eating in the smartphone market share.
post #53 of 138
The article tried to put a positive spin in it, but if 56% of the customers are already iPhone owners, Apple & ATT are ultimately taking less and less market share away from competitors. Granted, launch days tend to attract the loyal hard-core customers, but the goal needs to be expanding market share, not maintaining the base. It also seems many users are moving up to the family plan with multiple iPhones in the same household.

This is especially of concern to AT&T, their greatest reward is in acquiring a new customer, not just upselling an existing one.

In some ways this may point to a weakness in Apple's single-provider strategy in the USA. By relying on just AT&T they're limiting themselves. Long term they need to move to add at least a 2nd provider in markets like the USA if they want to gain significantly more market share. My own guess is that they're waiting for 4G (next year???) to add Verizon to the mix so that they don't have to support different chip sets.
post #54 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by lopsided View Post

The article tried to put a positive spin in it, but if 56% of the customers are already iPhone owners, Apple & ATT are ultimately taking less and less market share away from competitors. Granted, launch days tend to attract the loyal hard-core customers, but the goal needs to be expanding market share, not maintaining the base. It also seems many users are moving up to the family plan with multiple iPhones in the same household.

This is especially of concern to AT&T, their greatest reward is in acquiring a new customer, not just upselling an existing one.

In some ways this may point to a weakness in Apple's single-provider strategy in the USA. By relying on just AT&T they're limiting themselves. Long term they need to move to add at least a 2nd provider in markets like the USA if they want to gain significantly more market share. My own guess is that they're waiting for 4G (next year???) to add Verizon to the mix so that they don't have to support different chip sets.

This is just the first three days. That's always when the fans come out. We need to wait for more meaningful numbers which would come out for the whole month, or even the quarter. That's when the numbers begin to shift away from that fan base to the "normal" buyers.
post #55 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by lopsided View Post

The article tried to put a positive spin in it, but if 56% of the customers are already iPhone owners, Apple & ATT are ultimately taking less and less market share away from competitors. Granted, launch days tend to attract the loyal hard-core customers, but the goal needs to be expanding market share, not maintaining the base. It also seems many users are moving up to the family plan with multiple iPhones in the same household.

This is especially of concern to AT&T, their greatest reward is in acquiring a new customer, not just upselling an existing one.

In some ways this may point to a weakness in Apple's single-provider strategy in the USA. By relying on just AT&T they're limiting themselves. Long term they need to move to add at least a 2nd provider in markets like the USA if they want to gain significantly more market share. My own guess is that they're waiting for 4G (next year???) to add Verizon to the mix so that they don't have to support different chip sets.

True, but that still means that 44% of 1mil+ are new iPhone users... ~500k new users is decent for opening weekend, no?

One of my friends HATE iPhones... He calls us the "iPhone Douche Club", even though more and more of us are getting them. He's now a storm user... I'm sure once (if) the iPhone goes to Verizon (either through some sort of hybrid 4G system) he'll jump on board. ;-)
post #56 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

quick question: do many people have difficulty using the iphones on-screen keyboard?

back in the day (2001-2003 ish) i had a rim 857 and 957 at the hip and could type blazingly fast on them, even with my fat fingers, and even one-handed.

i've been an apple fan my entire life. and i've been waiting for a primo convergence device to come along. last year i purchased a 3g iphone and returned it. one of the many reasons i returned it was because of the keyboard.

along with lots of other stuff, i've also been waiting for a 32GB device and so this year i bought the 3g s, but more for the 3.0 software than the hardware.

i tried out the pre but they keyboard doesn't work for me.

the iphone's landscape mode keyboard in many instances gives me the ability to type as fast as i've ever been able to on a mobile device, instead of hunting and pecking most of the time. the fact that the potential exists for more contextual keyboards is another bonus.

i gotta say, this is the device i've been waiting for for seven or eight years.
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
Reply
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
Reply
post #57 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffharris View Post

Motorola made ONE nice phone. That was it.

The RAZR was/is ONLY a phone with a few extra features. It looked much nicer than the competition. The problem with motorola, is it was a one-shot/one-trick-pony. They had no ultimate plan to push the RAZR.

The iPhone is a PLATFORM and is SO much more than a mere phone, MORE than just nice looking hardware. It's the the OS, the software and the entire iTunes ecosystem. The phone aspect is almost secondary on some levels. Apple has a long term strategy. A strategy that I think we're just beginning to see unfold.

I can't wait until somebody writes "The iPod Story" sometime down the road!

I would agree, but it is a little more complicated than that.... Motorola sold 150 Million RAZRs world wide, it was the best selling cell phone, however, because "everyone" had one, people were no longer interested in having one.

As countless people pointed out as well as myself, Apple has it target market and will eek out every $ out of that market as they can, then move down the ladder and food chain, at some point people will not longer be interested since it not different.

Unlike computer which tend to hid under the desk, (until apple came along) cell phones are more of a fashion statement and show others they are important. So the question is will the iphone fall to the same tend, maybe, or maybe and maybe people will related more to what the phone can do then about how they appear to others.

I know plenty of people who ask my wife how she likes her iphone, wish they could afford it or justify it, then they went out and got a blackberry since they could get a deal on it.

I use to get the same thing with my RAZR, people would ask me about it all the time say how cool it was and wish they could afford one. Gave it to my son to use and now his friends laugh that he got a RAZR, it so uncool now. They do not have iphones, they got the phones with keyboard, that is cool to them.
post #58 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This is just the first three days. That's always when the fans come out. We need to wait for more meaningful numbers which would come out for the whole month, or even the quarter. That's when the numbers begin to shift away from that fan base to the "normal" buyers.

The problem is that from the history of the 2 previous iphones --- it's always like this:

First 3 days --- big numbers.
July-Sept quarter --- big numbers.
Oct-Dec quarter --- sales stalled (at July-Sept level) in the busy christmas quarter.
Jan-Mar quarter --- big drop off in sales.
Apr-June quarter (minus a week or week) --- "ran out of old gen iphones" and sales numbers are a decimal point.
post #59 of 138
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism
people [] with iPhones send much longer messages [] than people with other phones


Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

That's definitely me!!

And usually with proper capitalization and punctuation.
post #60 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

I would agree, but it is a little more complicated than that.... Motorola sold 150 Million RAZRs world wide, it was the best selling cell phone, however, because "everyone" had one, people were no longer interested in having one.

As countless people pointed out as well as myself, Apple has it target market and will eek out every $ out of that market as they can, then move down the ladder and food chain, at some point people will not longer be interested since it not different.

Unlike computer which tend to hid under the desk, (until apple came along) cell phones are more of a fashion statement and show others they are important. So the question is will the iphone fall to the same tend, maybe, or maybe and maybe people will related more to what the phone can do then about how they appear to others.

I know plenty of people who ask my wife how she likes her iphone, wish they could afford it or justify it, then they went out and got a blackberry since they could get a deal on it.

I use to get the same thing with my RAZR, people would ask me about it all the time say how cool it was and wish they could afford one. Gave it to my son to use and now his friends laugh that he got a RAZR, it so uncool now. They do not have iphones, they got the phones with keyboard, that is cool to them.

I think it's a bit more than that. The Razr was bought for one reason, the thinness. It was radical at the time, and everyone wants thin (ok, except for a few old codgers here).

But beyond that, there wasn't much to like about the phone. The later models expanded on the features, but it still wasn't much special.

Smartphones are very different. Apple is expanding the usefulness of the phone in many directions. It can do much that we didn't think a phone would do at all. The app store helps to move those sales.

As long as Apple can stay ahead, they won't have a problem.

As for competing in the $50 bracket, well, not for a time.

I agree with Tim here:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2348658,00.asp
post #61 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by lopsided View Post

The article tried to put a positive spin in it, but if 56% of the customers are already iPhone owners, Apple & ATT are ultimately taking less and less market share away from competitors. Granted, launch days tend to attract the loyal hard-core customers, but the goal needs to be expanding market share, not maintaining the base. It also seems many users are moving up to the family plan with multiple iPhones in the same household.

So what going to happen to these old phones, they are going to turn into hand me downs before you know it.

Like in my case, the wife will upgrade, since she maxed out the current iPhone and wants more power that 3.0 and 3G (S) will offer her. The question is what do we do with the current iphone, obvious one of the kids want it, but I am not interested in paying $70 a month for them to use, so I considering cracking it and add it as an $9.99 phone on the wife plan, they do not need all the data anyway.

I think you will see more an more of this and you do not have data plan part of the value of the phone goes away.
post #62 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

(...) I've never seen anyone 'touch typing' on a phone keyboard. I always see BB (et al) users looking at their keyboard when they type.
"FJ" dimples make sense when you're statically positioning your hands poised over base keys on a full keyboard. I don't see where dimples (or frankly, even a physical keyboard) makes any great difference on a thumbs-typing device.


actually all my old phones (sony k800i, nokia, even the siemens) have little dimples on the JKL key or a bracket around the JKL key

take a look here

http://mezzo.gs/store/mm/media/catal...on-w810i-2.jpg
http://gadget7.com/wp-content/upload...kia-n96_02.jpg
http://www.photoxels.com/images/sony...phone-1024.jpg
http://compareindia.in.com/media/ima...nokia_n70m.jpg
http://ucables.com/img/ipics/SONY-ER...-UN-R99547.jpg

and i have typed a few texts without looking at the keyboard. however i think the longest one was: "in meeting, call later" :-)

i agree, software screens are the future.
maybe a protector screen with embedded wires as guides for key positions will come in handy.
-D
post #63 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

The problem is that if you are in a meeting and your wag texts you, you have to look while you type as there is no point of reference. If you have a physical keyboard it is a lot easier to text without being a distraction in a meeting.

You may have just hit on the method Apple will use to market the iPhone to the big corporate bosses.
  • "Switch away from BlackBerry and your employees will have to listen to you during your meetings! "
  • "No more wondering what their hands are doing under the boardroom table! (and who wants to think about that, anyway?)"


The fortune 500 will drop like flies now...
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #64 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by samab View Post

The problem is that from the history of the 2 previous iphones --- it's always like this:

First 3 days --- big numbers.
July-Sept quarter --- big numbers.
Oct-Dec quarter --- sales stalled (at July-Sept level) in the busy christmas quarter.
Jan-Mar quarter --- big drop off in sales.
Apr-June quarter (minus a week or week) --- "ran out of old gen iphones" and sales numbers are a decimal point.

Sure. But the question was; who is buying the phones?

Don't forget the little recession we're in as well. That Oct-Dec quarter this past year was brutal.
post #65 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

actually all my old phones (sony k800i, nokia, even the siemens) have little dimples on the JKL key or a bracket around the JKL key

take a look here

http://mezzo.gs/store/mm/media/catal...on-w810i-2.jpg
http://gadget7.com/wp-content/upload...kia-n96_02.jpg
http://www.photoxels.com/images/sony...phone-1024.jpg
http://compareindia.in.com/media/ima...nokia_n70m.jpg
http://ucables.com/img/ipics/SONY-ER...-UN-R99547.jpg

and i have typed a few texts without looking at the keyboard. however i think the longest one was: "in meeting, call later" :-)

i agree, software screens are the future.
maybe a protector screen with embedded wires as guides for key positions will come in handy.
-D

My old Treo 700p also has a dimple on a key, but it's the "k" key. I still couldn't type for beans on it.
post #66 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

You may have just hit on the method Apple will use to market the iPhone to the big corporate bosses.
  • "Switch away from BlackBerry and your employees will have to listen to you during your meetings! "
  • "No more wondering what their hands are doing under the boardroom table! (and who wants to think about that, anyway?)"


The fortune 500 will drop like flies now...

I don't remember seeing people type on their phones without looking at them, though I suppose some can do that, at least some of the time.
post #67 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post

Based on my personal observations I think this trend of eating into the Blackberry market is likely to continue. While the common wisdom is that Blackberry users are serious corporate types, the Blackberry, (especially the Bold and the Pearl), has been very popular with average consumers, especially young women, for quite a while in my area.

I work at a large University and take the train to work every day and what I see is the Blackberry devices being very, very popular amongst the younger texting crowd on the train, but these folks almost always have an iPod in their lap as well. It's a safe bet that most of these people will eventually move to a single device and given the demographics, this device is likely to be an iPhone.

IMO the portion of Blackberry's clientele that are "hard core" corporate users (basically those that have the Blackberry given to them by their workplace), will stick with it, but it's future as a consumer smartphone seems very dim indeed.

Young university types are often leading indicators of these markets and on my daily commute, it seems like the iPhone is just passing the 50% mark about now when I look about me on the train whereas even a month ago it was more like 60/40 for blackberry. This is just one tiny data point for sure, but interesting nonetheless.

One pundit said this morning that the smartphone market is about explode and soon all telco's have a good chance to pick up more sales. The % may change but the gross sales should go up for every phone maker. So BB may lose & share but gain in sales anyway.
Just saying.

In fact are they phones at all anymore ?
Or mini -tablets filled with wireless goodies and personal media data files.
9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
whats in a name ? 
beatles
Reply
post #68 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I think it's a bit more than that. The Razr was bought for one reason, the thinness. It was radical at the time, and everyone wants thin (ok, except for a few old codgers here).

But beyond that, there wasn't much to like about the phone. The later models expanded on the features, but it still wasn't much special.

Smartphones are very different. Apple is expanding the usefulness of the phone in many directions. It can do much that we didn't think a phone would do at all. The app store helps to move those sales.

As long as Apple can stay ahead, they won't have a problem.

As for competing in the $50 bracket, well, not for a time.

I agree with Tim here:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2348658,00.asp

Yeah Moto sold lots of phones until it had to compete in the $50 bucket too.

As we all know, Apple is makes lots more money on other things other than the phone itself. Which is totally different that any other phone out there. It may not turn into a bad thing for Apple if the phone is given away at some point since it is a platform which allows them to make lots of money off it and the hardware becomes a mute point.

We all know that Apples does a far better job of integrating the, hardware, the OS, applications and services, however, if the link is broken in this well formed chain the advantage could be gone. If you can get the apps and services on other plateforms and they act and perform the same way people may not care anymore.

This is the risk that is being played out here by making the hardware trivial and possible the OS as well. Right now what makes the iphone worth having, it is cool, not everyone can have one, and all the things it does beyond being a phone.
post #69 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

Is there a typing genius app for the iphone?

Yes, I'm currently using Typing Genius (to improve my typing accuracy, not for the Japanese emojis). There are several such apps available on the App Store, so you may want to check out some of the others before purchasing. Typing Genius has exercises for both portrait and landscape modes that focus on each hand separately and together. It also has different types of exercises (e.g., numbers, punctuation, popular words, sentences, phrases, slang, etc.). Very helpful.

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #70 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaCameron View Post

Yes, I'm currently using Typing Genius (to improve my typing accuracy, not for the Japanese emojis). There are several such apps available on the App Store, so you may want to check out some of the others before purchasing. Typing Genius has exercises for both portrait and landscape modes that focus on each hand separately and together. It also has different types of exercises (e.g., numbers, punctuation, popular words, sentences, phrases, slang, etc.). Very helpful.

thanks!
-D
post #71 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I don't remember seeing people type on their phones without looking at them, though I suppose some can do that, at least some of the time.

Gee I see kids typing out msgs on numeric keypads phone while it is in their pockets, it can be done. I even witness a girl driving down the road typing out a msg without looking at the phone or taking her eyes off the road, I was amazed, but made sure I stayed clear of her.

Most kids do not type in full sentences or full word to be exact... if they get a few letters or words wrong that is okay with them.
post #72 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by samab View Post

Yeah, but that's just marketing talk. I can phrase the survey as --- despite RIM launches a couple of blackberries with well publicized firmware problems, their retention rate is still close to 90%.

It's not "eating" in the blackberry market when blackberries are growing faster than the iphone in eating in the smartphone market share.

Well, yeah. It's not a simple thing given that the success of either is sort of pushing the success of it's own competition. The "smartphone" market is booming in general and RIM is in fact growing as you say.

I was just making an entirely subjective observation based on what I see on my train every day. Over the last year or so the iPhone has been gradually replacing the Blackberry (as something I see people using on the train to the University), to the point that it seems roughly 50/50 right now. Given that I'm in Canada and the iPhone wasn't available a year ago I think it's pretty remarkable, but my town is a big tech town and it is the train to the University so take it with the appropriate giant grains of salt.
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
In Windows, a window can be a document, it can be an application, or it can be a window that contains other documents or applications. Theres just no consistency. Its just a big grab bag of monkey...
Reply
post #73 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Gee I see kids typing out msgs on numeric keypads phone while it is in their pockets, it can be done. I even witness a girl driving down the road typing out a msg without looking at the phone or taking her eyes off the road, I was amazed, but made sure I stayed clear of her.

Most kids do not type in full sentences or full word to be exact... if they get a few letters or words wrong that is okay with them.

I'm not talking about IM phrasing. I'm talking about what we're talking about needing a regular qwerty keyboard for; typing whole sentences, and even short paragraphs, hopefully without random, and significant errors.
post #74 of 138
Quote:
Approximately 12% of consumers who visited a retail store this past weekend to make their iPhone 3G S purchase said they were replacing a BlackBerry handset, the latest sign that Apple continues to make headway against rival Research in Motion in the high-stakes smartphone market.

First off a poll of 256 people who could skew the results knowing RIM is Apple's competition is by no means a wide enough, blind enough or accurate enough sampling.

Quote:
Speaking to clients in a report on the matter, analyst Gene Munster said he sees this trend as a sign that Apple may no longer be able to drive the average selling prices (ASPs) of iPhones higher simply by introducing models with greater storage capacity, as the lower capacity model appears to be sufficient for most early adopters for the first time in the handset's history this year.

Oh you don't know Apple, eventually somewhere, somehow, the quality of something will go up, requiring more storage capacity than current models carry.

It's that so many new people to the iPhone seen to think that the lower capacity would be good enough for their needs, having no idea what developers and Apple will do later to push the envelope to get people to upgrade to a new iPhone.

Experienced users of Apple products know in advance and, in my humble opinion, tend to buy the higher capacity models right off to gain the most life out of their purchases.
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
Reply
post #75 of 138
i agree, software screens are the future.
maybe a protector screen with embedded wires as guides for key positions will come in handy.
-D[/QUOTE]

Pantent that
post #76 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Oh you don't know Apple, eventually somewhere, somehow, the quality of something will go up, requiring more storage capacity than current models carry.

It's that so many new people to the iPhone seen to think that the lower capacity would be good enough for their needs, having no idea what developers and Apple will do later to push the envelope to get people to upgrade to a new iPhone.

Experienced users of Apple products know in advance and, in my humble opinion, tend to buy the higher capacity models right off to gain the most life out of their purchases.

The question is how many people use their phones to store vast amounts of music and video? Those who do will always want more storage, but for those who don't, they won't.

A phone isn't like a regular computeryet. We don't dump all of our junk there and leave it to rot.
post #77 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Pre is niche product within the CDMA market... Sprint, Verizon, etc, where Apple does not have offerings. They can expand to S. Korea, India, China, Canada an even Brazil. CDMA has 20% of the global cellphone market.

CDMA being phased out since last year here in Brazil by the last carrier still supporting it. New phones are all GSM.
Help kill Adobe's Flash. Complain to websites using it. Join YouTube's HTML5 beta (http://www.youtube.com/html5)
Reply
Help kill Adobe's Flash. Complain to websites using it. Join YouTube's HTML5 beta (http://www.youtube.com/html5)
Reply
post #78 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

The problem is that if you are in a meeting and your wag texts you, you have to look while you type as there is no point of reference. If you have a physical keyboard it is a lot easier to text without being a distraction in a meeting.

Except that it's all too easy to hear the texting... it's so obnoxious when you can hear every time they push one of the keys down, especially in a meeting.
post #79 of 138
Math geek fights rule!!!
post #80 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I'm not talking about IM phrasing. I'm talking about what we're talking about needing a regular qwerty keyboard for; typing whole sentences, and even short paragraphs, hopefully without random, and significant errors.

Sadly, many people, not just "kids these days," fail to type/write (whether texting, emailing or whatever) in complete, grammatically correct, sentences with proper spelling and punctuation. People's aversion to T9, or their preference for multi-tapping keys on a number pad (or maybe just their own laziness) seemed to be making the growing problem worse. The iPhone's auto-correction feature seems to help a lot though. At least, I hope it is. Honestly, the farther away from proper English it is, the more tedious, difficult (or even painful) it is to read.

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › 12% of early iPhone 3G buyers report ditching their BlackBerry