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Apple posts new Snow Leopard, 10.5.8 seeds - Page 2

post #41 of 59
You should probably just report it, then, scratchnsniff
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

You should probably just report it, then, scratchnsniff

True, I should report it, too bad I am unable due to the alternative means by which I acquired it.
post #43 of 59
Translation: I got this when I wasn't supposed to.
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

Translation: I got this when I wasn't supposed to.

That is rather condescending to the other posters on this website making the assumption that they needed assistance.
post #45 of 59
Sorry to anyone who was offended. I didn't mean to be condescending.
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

... I'm going to imagine you didn't say that...

Of course.
post #47 of 59
The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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The danger is that we sleepwalk into a world where cabals of corporations control not only the mainstream devices and the software on them, but also the entire ecosystem of online services around...
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post #48 of 59
Did they say some anti-aliasing was going to be applied to the scaled images in Expose? If so, has it been?
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PG4G View Post

Sorry to anyone who was offended. I didn't mean to be condescending.

I failed to see where you was condescending at all.

9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
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whats in a name ? 
beatles
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post #50 of 59
The original WWDC release was still a bit unstable in my opinion...at least on my hardware. For non-mission critical stuff (goofing around), I use a 2006 Black Macbook (2 Ghz Core Duo). So I'm living in the 32-bit world for this software and too often the WWDC release would lock up and freeze for no reason. The 10A394 release that I just downloaded seems to be a lot more stable...only one crash in the last few days. I'm debating on how efficient the new Grand Central is...I still have to compare it to how Leopard managed threads/memory. And the new Quicktime is nice but can't break the laws of physics. The Intel graphics in this thing just can't handle some things you throw at it. I have a few MP4s on this machine from a 720p HD source from my Tivo. The bitrate I converted them is still too much even for the new Quicktime to do in software without dropping frames. Core 2 Duo machines in my house don't have this problem (under Leopard).

But this is looking pretty good for September. I'm considering remaking the internal drive on this machine for full time Snow Leopard except I'd probably have to completely rebuild it for the release version since I don't think Apple allows you a smooth upgrade from a beta.
post #51 of 59
3 days with no news!
post #52 of 59
Resolution independence is the new push notification.
post #53 of 59
Accept that Push Notifications were announced and delivered in the time frame we've been waiting for resolution independence.

In 2006 WWDC Peter Graffagnino (Senior Director, Interactive Media Group) said Apple expect to be ready in 2008.
post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenfeet View Post

The 10A394 release that I just downloaded seems to be a lot more stable...only one crash in the last few days. I'm debating on how efficient the new Grand Central is...I still have to compare it to how Leopard managed threads/memory. And the new Quicktime is nice but can't break the laws of physics.

If you want to do some testing, use benchmark tools in Leopard and SL. I am seeing over a 10% increase in performance over Leopard for the same HW setup. Of course, that doesnt translate into real world performance increases, but it does show an improvement. Also, you can test the CPU usage for apps QuickTime and VLC in Leopard and QuickTime X and VLC for SL. I still see a lot more processing power used for the QuickTime over VLC for any video type so i wonder if that HW decoding is actually working yet. Im using the 9400M IGP in a unibody MacBook.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If you want to do some testing, use benchmark tools in Leopard and SL. I am seeing over a 10% increase in performance over Leopard for the same HW setup. Of course, that doesnt translate into real world performance increases, but it does show an improvement. Also, you can test the CPU usage for apps QuickTime and VLC in Leopard and QuickTime X and VLC for SL. I still see a lot more processing power used for the QuickTime over VLC for any video type so i wonder if that HW decoding is actually working yet. Im using the 9400M IGP in a unibody MacBook.

I haven't gotten a chance to do any formal benchmarks yet but I'm typing this from my wife's Macbook Pro (2.4 Ghz Santa Rosa) under SL. I asked Quicktime to run a number of MP4s I have from ripped DVDs I own. In this case it was five different DVD-quality videos playing simultaneously over a 802.11N connection. The graphics chip is the nVidia 8600M GT, which is still pretty nice and nVidia still sells it. But I don't think it does MP4 decoding on the card either. The five different videos playing worked pretty well although judging by the activity monitor that I doubted if I could add a sixth without frame drops. But when I brought up a 1080p movie trailer, the Macbook Pro could play the video just fine but not do much else than in terms of video.

My Mac Mini (brand new) has a 9400M chip, but I'm not sure what it can do either. I'll have to try it.
post #56 of 59
I hope Apple are providing some working graphics drivers for the nVidia 285 (EVGA) as the card maker cannot write and install code correctly.

I've experienced countless problems (hard crashes) with the Mac Edition 285 GPU since installing it.
post #57 of 59
Gee, maybe I should read the Snow Leopard specs on Apple's own website before speculating on what works and what doesn't. According to Apple, Open CL compatibility works on the following GPUs:

NVIDIA:
Geforce 8600M GT, GeForce 8800 GT, GeForce 8800 GTS, Geforce 9400M, GeForce 9600M GT, GeForce GT 120, GeForce GT 130.

ATI:
Radeon 4850, Radeon 4870

That would mean that my wife's Macbook Pro Santa Rosa is capable of OpenCL acceleration, but right now I don't have any way to test this. But for H.264 acceleration, only one GPU works:

nVidia 9400M.

That means that although my Mac Mini 2009 can't do OpenCL, it can to H.264 in hardware (and curious that none of the fancier chips in the iMacs, MacBook Pros or Mac Pros can't). Well, I'll test my Mac Mini later today and see what it can do.
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenfeet View Post

That means that although my Mac Mini 2009 can't do OpenCL, it can to H.264 in hardware (and curious that none of the fancier chips in the iMacs, MacBook Pros or Mac Pros can't). Well, I'll test my Mac Mini later today and see what it can do.

You have a Mac Mini from 2009. That machine has an Nvidia GeForce 9400M IGP. That means it currently has the capability for OpenCL -AND- H.264 hardware acceleration in Snow Leopard.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You have a Mac Mini from 2009. That machine has an Nvidia GeForce 9400M IGP. That means it currently has the capability for OpenCL -AND- H.264 hardware acceleration in Snow Leopard.

Gee, I can't read. How embarrassing.

Anyway, I booted SL and tried to play a number of 1080p movie clips from the iTunes movie site. These videos typically are well encoded and make a nice test. Under Leopard, I could play about three of them simultaneously until saturated the CPU bandwidth. Under SL, I could get five going, but the machines would still drop lots of frames. Granted, I was also doing the videos over my network (wired, getting files off of an ancient Leopard Server) so that might make a difference. More testing to come.
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