Gigawire

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
will be on the new PM but it is not just faster firewire.



You get 2 new gigawire ports in and out.

You connect your Macs together by gigawire.

You now have a gigawire network.

Any firewire devices on the network are accessable on any mac,

AND: any spare processor capacity!

That's right, you can now create a render farm in 5 minutes.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    [quote]Originally posted by philbot:

    <strong>will be on the new PM but it is not just faster firewire.



    You get 2 new gigawire ports in and out.

    You connect your Macs together by gigawire.

    You now have a gigawire network.

    Any firewire devices on the network are accessable on any mac,

    AND: any spare processor capacity!

    That's right, you can now create a render farm in 5 minutes.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Ummm... First off, FireWire can and IS already doing exactly what you say GigaWire can do... Sorry but this thread just totally blew your "G5" thread.



    GigaWire IN and GigaWire OUT. Gee, I wonder why nobody ever came up with a system that has both ETHERNET IN ports as well as ETHERNET OUT ports. No wait I've got an even better idea.. hows about USB IN ports and USB OUT ports... Okay okay wait even better... Airport IN antenna and a Airport OUT antenna...



    Dave



    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: DaveGee ]</p>
  • Reply 2 of 15
    gustavgustav Posts: 823member
    The funny thing about Gigawire is that nobody really knows for sure what it is, but if the new PowerMacs don't have it, they'll be really pissed and switch to PCs. Oh yeah, and Apple will go down the tubes.



    As for this blowing philbot's G5 thread - no it didn't - nobody believed it anyway.
  • Reply 3 of 15
    tjmtjm Posts: 367member
    I'm beginning to suspect that Gigawire is Apple's implementation of Fibre Channel. All their ads for network engineers want experience in both Ethernet and Fibre Channel. It makes as much sense as anything else I've heard.
  • Reply 4 of 15
    ipoipo Posts: 1member
    Gigawire. Could it be something relating to this. . .



    <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/wireless/2002/01/03/fcc-expand-wireless-frontier.htm"; target="_blank">http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/wireless/200 2/01/03/fcc-expand-wireless-frontier.htm</a>



    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: IPO ]</p>
  • Reply 5 of 15
    Ever wonder why every NEW tecnology has it mentioned that it can help rescuers find earthquake victims?
  • Reply 6 of 15
    Re: Gigawire



    Perhaps will Apple use the name instead of the new RAPIDIO technology.



    RapidIo &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt; Gigawire ?

    AliVec &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt; Velocity Engine



    Rooster
  • Reply 7 of 15
    [quote]That's right, you can now create a render farm in 5 minutes.<hr></blockquote>

    [quote]First off, FireWire can and IS already doing exactly what you say GigaWire can do...<hr></blockquote>



    So you can build a render farm through firewire for 2 Macs? Tell me if this is true, b/c i've never heard anything like this
  • Reply 8 of 15
    screedscreed Posts: 1,077member
    [quote]Originally posted by DaveGee:

    <strong>

    [snip]

    GigaWire IN and GigaWire OUT. Gee, I wonder why nobody ever came up with a system that has both ETHERNET IN ports as well as ETHERNET OUT ports. No wait I've got an even better idea.. hows about USB IN ports and USB OUT ports... Okay okay wait even better... Airport IN antenna and a Airport OUT antenna...



    Dave

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Um, well actually, optical fiber Ethernet connects are two fibers: Transmit (Tx) and Receive (Rx). So if Gigawire is optical and if it is what philbot says it is, then that might explain "in" and "out" ports.



    Screed



    Actually, as I write this I realize that if there only two ports per box then you could only cluster two computers together. To have &gt; 2 nodes you would need four ports (two in, two out) Hmm....



    And Gigawire is right, Firewire only shares devices. It does that poorly -- I tried to hook one external CDRW drive to a Cube and a Win2K box and neither could see/write to it.



    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: sCreeD ]</p>
  • Reply 9 of 15
    Does anyone remember localtalk?



    I seem to remember that was a quick and easy way of setting up a network with a few cables and tranceivers.



    Does anyone know if Apple have made any noises about new kinds of networking?
  • Reply 10 of 15
    tjmtjm Posts: 367member
    [quote]Originally posted by crakpot:

    <strong>Does anyone remember localtalk?



    I seem to remember that was a quick and easy way of setting up a network with a few cables and tranceivers.



    Does anyone know if Apple have made any noises about new kinds of networking?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    As I mentioned in my earlier post, Apple is looking for lots of network engineers who know about Fibre Channel:



    " Fibre Channel, a highly-reliable, gigabit interconnect technology allows concurrent communications among workstations, mainframes, servers, data storage systems, and other peripherals using SCSI and IP protocols. It provides interconnect systems for multiple topologies that can scale to a total system bandwidth on the order of a terabit per second. Fibre Channel delivers a new level of reliability and throughput. Switches, hubs, storage systems, storage devices, and adapters are among the products that are on the market today, providing the ability to implement a total system solution. "



    ...



    "Fibre Channel is a fast, reliable data transport system that scales to meet the requirements of any enterprise. Today, installations range from small post-production systems on Fibre Channel loop to very large CAD systems linking thousands of users into a switched, Fibre Channel network.



    *\tFibre Channel is ideal for these applications:

    *\tHigh-performance storage

    *\tLarge data bases and data warehouses

    *\tStorage backup systems and recovery

    *\tServer clusters

    *\tNetwork-based storage

    *\tHigh-performance workgroups

    *\tCampus backbones

    *\tDigital audio/video networks"



    From:<a href="http://www.fibrechannel.com/technology/index.master.html"; target="_blank">Fibre Channel Industry Association</a>



    This sounds remarkably like the properties that Gigawire is supposed to have. Anything from Storage Area Networks (SANs), workgroups, server clusters, digital A/V, and already has standards set up to 4.24 Gbps. Unless someone can show me compelling evidence to the contrary, I remain convinced that this is Gigawire.



    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: TJM ]</p>
  • Reply 11 of 15
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    [quote]Originally posted by sCreeD:

    <strong>



    Um, well actually, optical fiber Ethernet connects are two fibers: Transmit (Tx) and Receive (Rx). So if Gigawire is optical and if it is what philbot says it is, then that might explain "in" and "out" ports.



    Screed



    Actually, as I write this I realize that if there only two ports per box then you could only cluster two computers together. To have &gt; 2 nodes you would need four ports (two in, two out) Hmm....



    And Gigawire is right, Firewire only shares devices. It does that poorly -- I tried to hook one external CDRW drive to a Cube and a Win2K box and neither could see/write to it.



    [ 01-19-2002: Message edited by: sCreeD ]</strong><hr></blockquote>





    Firewire can be used for networking and has been.
  • Reply 12 of 15
    gustavgustav Posts: 823member
    [quote]Originally posted by sCreeD:

    <strong>



    Um, well actually, optical fiber Ethernet connects are two fibers: Transmit (Tx) and Receive (Rx). So if Gigawire is optical and if it is what philbot says it is, then that might explain "in" and "out" ports.



    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Optical fibre does not need two fibres for each direction. As long as one direction is a different wavelength than the other, then one fibre is all that is needed. However, you are correct, you will need at least two ports to connect more than one machine, unless you introduce Gigawire hubs.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    It seems some are thowing out the only real FACT we have/know about GigaWire... Please, if you're willing to do that it's okay but just tell people upfront "FACTS be damned I think GigaWire is..."



    Word Mark\tGIGAWIRE

    Goods and Services



    IC 038. US 100 101 104. G & S:

    Telecommunication services;

    cellular telephone communication;

    Communication by computer terminals, communication by telephone, facsimile transmission;

    providing of electronic mail (E-Mail);

    computer aided transmission of messages and images;

    communication between computer peripherals and devices;

    information about telecommunication.



    IC 009. US 021 023 026 036 038. G & S:

    electrical and electronic equipment;

    computer hardware;

    computer firmware;

    computers;

    computer peripheral devices;

    handheld computers;

    telephones, mobile telephones, communication devices;

    telecommunications equipment and devices;

    wireless information devices;

    computer software programs;

    computer operating system programs;

    computer utility programs;

    computer application programs;

    computer software for the design, development, modeling, simulation, compiling, de-bugging, verification, construction and interfacing of electrical and electronic equipment, integrated circuits, cables and connectors all for use with computers, telecommunications equipment and devices, or computer peripheral devices;

    parts and fittings for all the aforesaid goods.



    Does that sound like FireWire? Does that sound like Fibre Channel? Sorry but with the only FACTS we have GigiWire doesn't fit either.



    Dave
  • Reply 14 of 15
    [quote]Originally posted by sCreeD:

    <strong>



    &lt;snip&gt;



    Actually, as I write this I realize that if there only two ports per box then you could only cluster two computers together. To have &gt; 2 nodes you would need four ports (two in, two out) Hmm....



    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Actually, you wouldnt need 4 ports. Think Token Ring, from out on one to in on another, all the way down the line until you have all the cpu's connected.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    I always thought it would be slick if Apple found a way of getting rid of ADC and using firewire for the monitor connection. I've been told that firewire doesn't have enough bandwith, but maybe the new firewire spec does. I know that firewire is seriously being considered as the standard i/o for HDTV so it must be able to handle at least that resolution. I don't know if it would have enough power to drive an LCD screen, thus obviating a seperate power cord.
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