Somewhat New to Mac

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I have had my iMAC now for about 3 months. Perhaps coming from a Windows based PC I have these questions I can't locate answers for:



1. Why do I have to enter a password every time I install software?

2. Do I really not need anti-virus software?

3. Do I need to worry about organizing files on the HD? i.e. iPhoto

4. In windows there was DOS and I knew many commands there, should I know Terminal on the iMAC and if so are there any websites which teach it.

5. Damn, I wish the Home and End keys worked like they do on a PC.

6. Ctrl + Enter is a great shortcut on the PC (Internet Explorer) is there anyway to get that on my iMac?



Thanks

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Welcome to the Mac and welcome to the forum.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    I have had my iMAC now for about 3 months. Perhaps coming from a Windows based PC I have these questions I can't locate answers for:



    1. Why do I have to enter a password every time I install software?



    This is standard for UNIX-based systems. It relates to your second question. It is a security measure that goes to thwart attempts to develop successful malware for MacOS X.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    2. Do I really not need anti-virus software?



    Antivirus software of the Mac is a citizenship tool. It allows you to disinfect files that you received from Windows-using colleagues so that you don't act as a carrier for their malware. MacOS X antivirus software cannot prevent the spread of MacOS X viruses because there aren't any.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    3. Do I need to worry about organizing files on the HD? i.e. iPhoto



    Worry? What is this worry? MacOS X is an extremely flexible OS. You can pretty much handle your files the way you want. iPhoto will organize your photographs for you. You may organize them yourself.



    MacOS X like MacOS before it makes it incredibly easy to organize your files. The word worry does not pertain.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    4. In windows there was DOS and I knew many commands there, should I know Terminal on the iMAC and if so are there any websites which teach it.



    Windows has the MS-DOS command line. MacOS X has the UNIX command line. Comparing MS-DOS to UNIX is like comparing a buggy to a Buick. If you want to do more command line stuff on your Mac, then get one of the books that deal with the UNIX side of MacOS X. That said, you can do virtually everything you need via the GUI. I use the command line to kill tasks that won't die or to remove files that have overstayed their welcome and won't leave.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    5. Damn, I wish the Home and End keys worked like they do on a PC.

    6. Ctrl + Enter is a great shortcut on the PC (Internet Explorer) is there anyway to get that on my iMac?



    Thanks



    MacOS X and Windows are different operating systems. They have different histories. You cannot expect things to be the same on the Mac as they are on Windows. To the 20-year Mac veteran, this is a very good thing. My advice to you is this:



    You are in a new land. You need to learn new ways.
  • Reply 2 of 8
    Thanks for the answers. Do you run anti-virus software on your Mac?



    On organizing my files, it appears that files for various application are stored in Documents. I'm thinking ahead and after hundreds or thousands of files are stored in the same location, on a windows PC it may slow things down. Should I save them in folders in Documents, or I really don't need to worry about the number of files slowing down the MAC?



    The good news is that FireFox uses the Ctrl + Enter to add the http:/www and .com. So I was just curious if there was some way to do it for Safari?



    After using a PC for 25 some years, some habits are hard to break.
  • Reply 3 of 8
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    T

    The good news is that FireFox uses the Ctrl + Enter to add the http:/www and .com. So I was just curious if there was some way to do it for Safari?

    .



    Just enter the name of the address you wan to go to, Safari will add the www. and .com on its own.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    Thanks for the answers. Do you run anti-virus software on your Mac?



    On organizing my files, it appears that files for various application are stored in Documents. I'm thinking ahead and after hundreds or thousands of files are stored in the same location, on a windows PC it may slow things down. Should I save them in folders in Documents, or I really don't need to worry about the number of files slowing down the MAC?



    The good news is that FireFox uses the Ctrl + Enter to add the http:/www and .com. So I was just curious if there was some way to do it for Safari?



    After using a PC for 25 some years, some habits are hard to break.



    Most of my colleagues Windows. I run antivirus software.



    What did I tell you? There is nothing to worry about when it comes to managing your files. There is no need to store all of your files in a single folder. Place them where you want. Create folders by date, by job, by whatever. Its fun and easy.



    One of the biggest mistakes that switchers make is assume that they should adapt instantaneously to the Mac. Give yourself time to get used to your new machine. One of the many wonderful things about the Mac is that you do not have to be proficient in order to be productive.
  • Reply 5 of 8
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    Most of my colleagues Windows. I run antivirus software.



    That's very civil of you. So you are protecting Windows users from their own risks.

    Who pays for that? And who should?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    I use the command line to kill tasks that won't die



    I use Force Quit, with a key combination or from the dock, or the Activity Monitor for that. So I never need Terminal or the Unix command line.
  • Reply 6 of 8
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    ...



    I use Force Quit, with a key combination or from the dock, or the Activity Monitor for that.



    I use Force Quit as well, but as I said some tasks won't die. That's when I use the command line to do them in. The Activity Monitor is a utility that I never use. However, the fact that you use it to kill those pesky immortal tasks is an example of a very nice MacOS X feature. There is often more than one way to get things done. It is also an example of the fact that you do not need to know everything about the OS to be productive.
  • Reply 7 of 8
    Thanks for the replies, I'm learning more. I never went into the activity monitor before. The column cpu does not appear to be % so what is the number there? I have never needed to kill an application, when or how often does it occur?
  • Reply 8 of 8
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TallStv View Post


    Thanks for the answers. Do you run anti-virus software on your Mac?



    On organizing my files, it appears that files for various application are stored in Documents. I'm thinking ahead and after hundreds or thousands of files are stored in the same location, on a windows PC it may slow things down. Should I save them in folders in Documents, or I really don't need to worry about the number of files slowing down the MAC?



    The good news is that FireFox uses the Ctrl + Enter to add the http:/www and .com. So I was just curious if there was some way to do it for Safari?



    After using a PC for 25 some years, some habits are hard to break.



    You can create your own keyboard shortcuts in any app through a very nice feature in OS X. There are some apps that don't have shortcuts for ever function and others that have shortcuts you don't like. Make your own in OS X.



    Go to the System Preferences panel and click on Keyboard & Mouse. Then select Keyboard Shortcuts and enjoy.



    I've created quite a few shortcuts that I need for my particular workflow and for the way I work.



    ---



    Killing apps: I need it on occasion and just use Force Quit. Right click on the open app's icon in the dock and an option will come up to Force Quit. If you have a single button mouse, hold Control and click.
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