First Apps to Leverage Open CL

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
The early demos of open CL are impressive. See here and this thread at Ars where people are running open cl benchmarks.



So I'm wondering what will be the first app to take advantage of open cl? My guess is iTunes. Ripping cds could be much faster and if DVD importing is supported as rumored, well ... it would rock.



So what apps do you think will among the earliest to leverage open cl?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,107member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by backtomac View Post


    The early demos of open CL are impressive. See here and this thread at Ars where people are running open cl benchmarks.



    So I'm wondering what will be the first app to take advantage of open cl? My guess is iTunes. Ripping cds could be much faster and if DVD importing is supported as rumored, well ... it would rock.



    So what apps do you think will among the earliest to leverage open cl?



    QuickTime already does, including a multitude of low-level frameworks. XCode 3.2 most likely takes advantage, IB and other Dev Tools.
  • Reply 2 of 3
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    QuickTime already does, including a multitude of low-level frameworks. XCode 3.2 most likely takes advantage, IB and other Dev Tools.



    Didn't know that. Thanks for the info. Do you think the next version of iTunes will use open cl? Maybe we'll find out next week.
  • Reply 3 of 3
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,157moderator
    Inside the developer kit Quartz Composer, which is a hardware-accelerated node-based compositor, there is now an option to add an OpenCL kernel so I guess technically it's one of the first apps to use it.



    The reason image processing is so good is that you typically apply functions to individual or groups of pixels and you can do this in parallel very quickly, which works great for OpenCL.



    Quicktime possibly uses it for post-processing during video decoding and H264 decoding. H264 uses about half the CPU it did in Leopard. It may not be OpenCL of course as supported GPUs actually have hardware decoding, so it could just be an updated driver that uses it.



    I hope that one day Quartz composer and Motion merge together to become Shake's replacement. As long as they get GPU computation free from lock-ups.



    There is also the possibility for incredible looking games because you can program pretty much arbitrary effects without relying on OpenGL versions. The question there I guess is where does GLSL stop and OpenCL begin. Quartz Composer supports GLSL too.
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