Will Apple take on Dreamweaver?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Almost all of Apple's products use Webkit in some way or another, and the iPhone lives or dies by it.



So it's no surprise that Cupertino is pouring time and money into its development.



Apple is doing this while publicly shunning Adobe's Flash. Of course, the excuse of record is that Flash is a resource hog. But the complaints sound awful similar to the 'Big Bag of Hurt' accusation levelled at Blu-Ray, or Jobs' famous trashing of solid state music players that 'just sit in a drawer somewhere'.



In other words, it sounds a lot like like the noise Apple typically makes when it is getting ready to introduce its own solution.



The world of web development is already in flux because of HTML5 (which is said to be able to negate the need for Flash altogether.) Apple is pouring resources into web development while also cutting older tech like WebObjects loose.



Adobe seems to be in disarray, not even being able to properly handle customer service calls and getting lambasted by its own users for mixed messaging on CS3's Snow Leopard compatibility. Of even greater concern to Apple is that leaving web development in Adobe's hands means that the Mac and PC are on even terms, along with Silverlight and Flash being pushed on mobile phone interfaces at the same time as Palm reaches out to web developers to build their apps.



With all this going on, I'm thinking Apple almost has no choice but to market a Mac-only Web Design app that embraces HTML5 development, Quicktime X, MobileMe, iTunes and the iPhone.



iWeb just ain't going to cut it in 2010. What do you think?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    Dreamweaver was a darling program years ago but like a lot of apps it's become bloated over the years and with Flash being crammed down everyone's gullet I don't have much hope for it becoming a bastion of openess.



    Apple really needs to field a new Pro app and that app needs to pave the road for excellent web development leveraging the new features of HTML5 and hopefully adding in great SVG support and more.



    It really dovetails into the excellent tools Apple has delivered to manipulate static images and video. I agree as well with your points on Webkit. I really never expected Webkit to have such an impact but it has surpassed any dream I have had for the product.



    I'd pony up for a Web Dev app from Apple that displays the type of fit and finish of their current Pro apps along with a new superior way of managing and developing web content.
  • Reply 2 of 4
    piotpiot Posts: 1,346member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post


    Apple is doing this while publicly shunning Adobe's Flash. Of course, the excuse of record is that Flash is a resource hog. But the complaints sound awful similar to the 'Big Bag of Hurt' accusation levelled at Blu-Ray, or Jobs' famous trashing of solid state music players that 'just sit in a drawer somewhere'.





    Real questions:

    How many cellphones actually run 'real' Flash?

    How many phones ran it 2 years ago... when the whole iPhone/Flash problem was raised... ?

    How many people opt for the Blu-Ray drive option when they buy a computer?

    How many of those solid state MP3 players were really low capacity (63-256MB)?



    Quote:

    In other words, it sounds a lot like like the noise Apple typically makes when it is getting ready to introduce its own solution.



    Yes it could be... or it could just be... the truth.



    Blu-Ray might end up on Macs but there is certainly no rush to get there.

    Dreamweaver just isn't as important anymore.
  • Reply 3 of 4
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,213moderator
    They have XCode so there's no reason they couldn't make a Dreamweaver-style app with a webkit preview box. I'd like to see something like this that also allowed people to do CSS animations in the same fashion as Flash's IDE.



    Apple bundle the Apache webserver and they could easily do PHP debugging on top of normal coding. It could come part of iLife, possibly even as an extension to iWeb.



    I doubt they will though because Apple just don't make useful apps, they make gimmicky apps that have no real pro use but are easy to teach to old people. Any app that does any really good stuff, they bought from someone else - Final Cut Pro, Color, Shake, Logic, itunes, none of them started life at Apple. Even OS X didn't.



    I have yet to see an app developed from the ground up at Apple that people rely on day to day in professional work. Possibly Quicktime and Aperture are exceptions but the list is very small. If they developed an app to rival Dreamweaver, I'd be impressed but my expectations of Apple's ability in this area are very low.
  • Reply 4 of 4
    With tons of standards compliant, open source (free) content management and blog softwares out there, I don't think the future of web apps is making one-off sites in Dreamweaver-type apps. That's my humble opinion. I agree that Dreamweaver just isn't as relevant these days as back in the early 2000s era.



    The beauty of CMS and blog softwares is they are platform agnostic, web accessible, and standards compliant. There's nothing Apple-specific about them. They sidestep platforms and plugins, which is one reason for their success.



    PS Marvin: good point about the dearth of in-house pro software.
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