Clarification on QuickTime v. numbers

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Just installed Snow Leopard and Quicktime Player bumped up 10.0 (51).



I have some fragments of video I want to make into one file, so I want to upgrade to Quicktime Pro.



However, the Quicktime version on the Apple site is 7.6.4 - which can be upgraded to Pro ($29.99).



I thought that within Quicktime Player I could "upgrade" to pro by paying the license and then it would unlock all the "pro" features. There is no such option in the Quicktime installed with SL.



Should I DL Quicktime Pro 7?



Is there a difference between "QuickTime Player" and "Quicktime"?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,195moderator
    Yes, Apple made the very bright move of making you have two versions installed to get any proper work done. It's like what they did with iMovie.



    Quicktime Player X is meant for playing movies only. To get the pro Quicktime features, you have to install version 7 separately (it's an option on the Snow Leopard install disc under customize).



    It installs version 7 in your Utilities folder, which means you will have to configure which ones your media files open in.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,698member
    a.) What Marvin said, with the additional note that QuickTime X does have some very limited editing and exporting options included for free, but it doesn't come close to the functionality of QuickTime Player 7 Pro



    b.) Try MPEG streamclip
  • Reply 3 of 7
    Thx Marv & Mr. H.



    I'm new to Mac (18 months or so) and I couldn't believe Apple would do something so lame... I guess it's not exclusive...
  • Reply 4 of 7
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,698member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alanbrowne View Post


    I'm new to Mac (18 months or so) and I couldn't believe Apple would do something so lame...



    Here's the deal:



    The operating system that Apple had prior to OS X (now referred to as "Classic") lacked many of the important features of modern OSes, in particular pre-emptive multi-tasking and protected memory. Apple tried to add these to the OS in a long-running project that ultimately failed (Copland). When it was clear that Copland wasn't going to deliver, Apple started looking to buy in a new OS from elsewhere and ended up buying NeXT. However, they had a problem: NeXT had its own APIs, meaning software written for Classic, which had its own set of APIs, wouldn't run on NeXT. Trying to get software developers to "port" all their apps to NeXT's APIs when it wasn't clear if Apple would even be around all that much longer was a non-starter. What Apple did instead was identify which APIs from Classic could fit into a modern OS environment (finally the Copland project delivers something useful) and make them work with NeXT's OS. Software developers would then only have to "tweak" their apps to run on the new system, rather than do full-blown re-writes. The set of Classic APIs was dubbed "Carbon" and the NeXT APIs were dubbed "Cocoa".



    In terms of QuickTime, it's important to appreciate that QuickTime is two things:



    1.) QuickTime is a "technology" consisting of a huge range of multimedia related APIs. If an application on OS X does pretty much anything to do with pictures, movies or sound, it'll almost certainly be using QuickTime APIs.



    2.) A "player" application. The player applications leverage the QuickTime APIs.



    QuickTime was born on Classic and the QuickTime APIs in the beginning of OS X were all Carbon. Apple has slowly been "Cocoa-ising" the QuickTime APIs (the newer Cocoa flavoured QuickTime APIs sitting alongside the Carbon ones rather than replacing them), but the player app has always used the older Carbon ones.



    With Snow Leopard, the set of "Cocoa" QuickTime APIs (which can now be referred to as QuickTime X APIs) for playback is complete enough to build a player app on top; this is QuickTime X. However, on the more complex editing side of things, the "Cocoa" QuickTime APIs aren't complete enough to enable a complete replacement of all the pro features of the QuickTime 7 Player Pro application.



    The QuickTime X API set will continue to grow and become more advanced (a plugin architecture is the most obvious need) and eventually there will be a fully featured QuickTime X player that will enable us to do away with the QuickTime 7 player. We can be sure of this as the QuickTime X API's relative immaturity is what's preventing many of Apple's Pro apps (Final Cut etc.) from moving to Cocoa and becoming fully 64 bit (there's no 64 bit Carbon).



    If you have some time to kill, I can highly recommend reading the series of Ars Technica OS X reviews for more info:



    Mac OS X 10.0

    Mac OS X 10.1

    Mac OS X 10.2

    Mac OS X 10.3

    Mac OS X 10.4

    Mac OS X 10.5

    Mac OS X 10.6
  • Reply 5 of 7
    Where I'm at now:



    1. Moved Quicktime Player into a DMG. Deleted it from apps.



    2. DL'd QT 7 and tried to install. Got a "Can't install because Quicktime X is already present" message.



    Queer setup if I can't run "Pro" at all 'cause I can't go back to Quicktime 7 and X does not have a "pro" version.



    Note, I'm not a Mac expert by any stretch - is there something stupid I'm doing (specifically, pls, I do enough generically stupid things...).



    (Also note: just up'd to OS 10.6.1 --- they're already updating SL).



    I'll try a re-boot after I move the DMG off to the backup disk. Of course it's on the Time Machine backup as well... I think.



    tick ... tick ... tick ...



    Well, that didn't work either...



    Now I'll try as Marvin suggested and see if I can install it off of the SL install disk (w/o re-installing SL, I hope).
  • Reply 6 of 7
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,698member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alanbrowne View Post


    Now I'll try as Marvin suggested and see if I can install it off of the SL install disk (w/o re-installing SL, I hope).



    The download you tried is the underlying QT architecture and the player.



    Install 7 from the SL disk, which will be just the player.



    There's no need to remove QT X, it and 7 can coexist peacefully.



    But seriously, try MPEG streamclip that I linked to earlier. It uses QuickTime, will do what you need it to, and is free. I don't know if it works on 10.6 but it should; as it's just an app, there's no harm in giving it a go.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post


    The download you tried is the underlying QT architecture and the player.



    Install 7 from the SL disk, which will be just the player.



    There's no need to remove QT X, it and 7 can coexist peacefully.



    But seriously, try MPEG streamclip that I linked to earlier. It uses QuickTime, will do what you need it to, and is free. I don't know if it works on 10.6 but it should; as it's just an app, there's no harm in giving it a go.



    I just installed from the disk (could have saved all that time, I didn't understand that what is on the disk (a player) and what is in the DL are different beasts).



    Once I get that sorted out, I'll see if I can re-install QT X from the DMG I made.



    Thanks Mr. H and Marv for the support - even if I don't act on it the right way!

    Alan.
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