Great Movie Effects....list your favorites.

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Man I love good movie effects. Let's list some of our fav scenes so that when I get a DVD I'll know what to look for! I'll start this off.



Lord of the Rings-



Following the defeat of Sauron the ripple effect of dropping bodies with a Pitch changing sustained bass sound was phenomenal. Captured the power of the moment just right.



The Matrix-



Of course Bullet Time was an eye opener, The Matrix used it better than anyone had prior.



Mission Impossible



Loved the scene where Ethan is blown from the helicopter to Train.





Sheesh...now that I compose this I'm getting brain lock. Go ahead add your favs.



[ 12-31-2001: Message edited by: hmurchison ]</p>

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    I don't know about the single best effect I've seen, but the best movie explosion for me was the one from the beginning of Swordfish
  • Reply 2 of 16
    ac2cac2c Posts: 60member
    I second the explosion in Swordfish. Fantastic work and design concept.
  • Reply 3 of 16
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Terminator 2.
  • Reply 4 of 16
    FYI, "affects" is not the corrct term here. Effects is.







    Plese fix the title!
  • Reply 5 of 16
    jrcjrc Posts: 804member
    I liked the effect that Kim Basinger had on me in 9 1/2 weeks.



    That's hard to shake the utter mind blowing, toe-numbing sensation I had when the video came out.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,230member
    [quote]Originally posted by Eugene:

    <strong>I don't know about the single best effect I've seen, but the best movie explosion for me was the one from the beginning of Swordfish</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Eugene good one! How could I forget. Being ex-Military I loved the "Human Claymore" aspect.



    [quote]FYI, "affects" is not the corrct term here. Effects is. <hr></blockquote>



    Go figure I had to go back and change affect to effect in the body but never thought to look at the title. Thanks for the Catch Starfleet...I try to take pride in my spelling but sometime I just type first and look later



    Another Effect that was nice but overdone was in Jet Li's The One in where their were deatomized(?) and sent to another parallel Universe. The effect is like the body disintegrating. It was nice but the used it like 4-5 times and it lost it's uniqueness.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    Not really an effect, but I absolutely love the logo animations for "Legacy Surround" and "THX Certified".
  • Reply 8 of 16
    [quote]Originally posted by MacAddict:

    <strong>Not really an effect, but I absolutely love the logo animations for "Legacy Surround" and "THX Certified".</strong><hr></blockquote>

    Me too! I liked the THX "robot" one so much that I parodied it with Infini-D about four years ago in high school (it's not perfect, so go easy on me!!). It preceeded a video I had edited on my Mac too. Needless to say, the teacher was impressed.



    <a href="http://brad.project-think.com/movies/RJR_Audience_is_Studying.mov"; target="_blank">http://brad.project-think.com/movies/RJR_Audience_is_Studying.mov</a>;



    (RJR is for R.J.Reynolds High School)



    Anyway... movie special effects? Well, Star Wars is a winner just 'cuz it was ahead of its time, so they say. Although plot was sub-par and the lip sync was a bit off, I'd say Final Fantasy was pretty good for all that realistic CG. For the same reasoning, I'd vote for Toy Story since it was the first big all-CG movie.



    I also have been impressed by some Star Trek stuff, namely the "ring" in Star Trek 6 when Praxis exploded.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    jeffyboyjeffyboy Posts: 1,055member
    It seems a little creepy now, but the White House explosion in Independence Day is still my favorite.



    Jeff
  • Reply 10 of 16
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    Whatever they did to make it look like Sharon Stone can act. AMAZING with what they can do with digital effects these days!
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Wow...lots.



    But the one that came to mind right now is the scene in the Fifth Element when Lelu escapes onto the building and then Willis takes her on that wild cop car chase throughout the city...awesome effects there...even got dizzy in the theatre.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    falconfalcon Posts: 458member
    In Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring

    At the beginning in the Prologue when Sauron had his ring. He flings like 20 elves 100ft in the air with one swipe of his staff. Super cool. And the millions of men being nocked down by the shockwave was cool to.

    Not really a big special effect but how Legolas can shoot his bow super fast. Yet it looks so natural.



    The Matrix

    When that woman escapes from the helicoper as it smashes into the building. A ripple goes through the glass then it explodes outward. Very cool.

    And of course the bullet time sequences.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    tmptmp Posts: 601member
    This is an old one, but it was pretty neat at the time: in "Death Becomes Her" after Meryl Streep is pushed down the stairs by Bruce Willis, she hobbles to her feet, putting her shattered limbs back into place, walks backwards into the living room, notices that her head is on backwards, twists it back into place, and, seeing that vertebrae are still protruding a little from her neck, says "Honey, I think I need a doctor"
  • Reply 14 of 16
    One general effect that I've always admired is the combination of physically moving the camera towards the subject while zooming out, or just the opposite effect. This creates the effect of the subject's size remaining constant while the field of view of the background alters. If taken to extremes (camera gets really close to the subject) distance relative distortions are added to the subject. I can't think of any specific scenes that this happens in, but I've grown more aware of it in both the cinema and TV over the past couple of years.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,230member
    [quote]Originally posted by rsanford:

    <strong>One general effect that I've always admired is the combination of physically moving the camera towards the subject while zooming out, or just the opposite effect. This creates the effect of the subject's size remaining constant while the field of view of the background alters. If taken to extremes (camera gets really close to the subject) distance relative distortions are added to the subject. I can't think of any specific scenes that this happens in, but I've grown more aware of it in both the cinema and TV over the past couple of years.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    I always wondered how that effect was created. Actually it seems more difficult to create..you have to have precise movement and zooming to maximize the effect I would assume.
  • Reply 16 of 16
    shadygshadyg Posts: 64member
    [quote]Originally posted by rsanford:

    <strong>One general effect that I've always admired is the combination of physically moving the camera towards the subject while zooming out, or just the opposite effect...I can't think of any specific scenes that this happens in, but I've grown more aware of it in both the cinema and TV over the past couple of years.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    It was invented by Alfred Hitchcock for use in Vertigo.



    -- ShadyG
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