Macs 2010: USB3.0, FW1600+, both or neither?

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  • Reply 21 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


    Light Peak



    10Gbps bidirectional with a roadmap to 100Gbps

    Multiprotocol support including video.

    Small tranceiver (read affordable to manufacture) and routing silicon coming from Intel.



    Come on folks Intel's not going to spend a bunch of R&D on USB 3 when Light Peak offers so much more.



    Yes USB 3.0 will come but if you're a storage vendor you're going to promote the fastest connector which means you're testing out Light Peak as soon as it's available.



    If you're not a storage vendor then the appeal of USB 3.0 is largely moot because how fast a connection does a printer, scanner or non storage technology need?



    Intel spent probably 100x as much R&D on the GPGPU they just canceled. Intel spends research money like it's just paper.



    The appeal of USB 3.0 is that the port on the computer is 100% backwards compatible with older devices, and it's fast enough for next-generation storage. It can also deliver almost twice as much power as USB 2.0- 900mAmps. That last part will be very useful to small peripheral makers who don't need the bandwidth but do need the power.
  • Reply 22 of 27
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,129member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post


    Intel spent probably 100x as much R&D on the GPGPU they just canceled. Intel spends research money like it's just paper.



    The appeal of USB 3.0 is that the port on the computer is 100% backwards compatible with older devices, and it's fast enough for next-generation storage. It can also deliver almost twice as much power as USB 2.0- 900mAmps. That last part will be very useful to small peripheral makers who don't need the bandwidth but do need the power.



    Backwards compatibilty doesn't mean much if only storage devices truly benefit from USB 3.0. Right now small portable drives (HDD and optical) have plenty of power via standard USB. I could see some fringe video and audio devices requiring more power but that's a niche within a niche.



    The marketing problem is this. With USB 3.0 you have one primary advantage which is speed but it doesn't enable anything special. With Light Peak you have superior speed, superior latency, superior cable lengths, superior protocol support and it doesn't appear to be a host based connection so it will be superior there as well.



    I'm not saying Light Peak vs USB 3.0 is either/or but the impact Light Peak will being to computers will be far more pronounced than Firewire or USB can achieve.
  • Reply 23 of 27
    Light peak, or something similar, may well be the long term future, but it's not the 2010-2011 future.
  • Reply 24 of 27
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,129member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post


    Light peak, or something similar, may well be the long term future, but it's not the 2010-2011 future.



    Same could be said for USB 3.0 which Intel, ostensibly, has no plans to integrate into the Mobo until 2011.
  • Reply 25 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


    Same could be said for USB 3.0 which Intel, ostensibly, has no plans to integrate into the Mobo until 2011.



    part of the chipset in 2011. On mobo as a added chip in 2010
  • Reply 26 of 27
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    None of the above in 2010. It's just not worth the investment without compelling USB3.0 devices ~ Only thing is the Apple Tablet would have 3G in it, and maybe, maybe, the Macbook Air. And media delivery on SD is just not going to happen until 2011... if at all.



    Of course, next year Apple has probably at least one rabbit it will pull out of a hat, we'll just have to see what it is.
  • Reply 27 of 27
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I agree with your assessment about both being ubiquitous but note that LightPeak has power planned, according to Wikipedia.

    It seems a little too late, BB will reportedly require you to supply your own SD card and the DRM will make it playable on specific HW. Blu-ray is the last optical media for consumers, NAND will be the way physical movies will survive in the future. but I don?t think BB has a winner on their hands.





    The trend to remove optical drives may have started with netbooks or ultra-lights, but HP has moved it to high-end notebooks now with the 13? and 15? HP Envys. As you know, companies usually beat Apple to the punch but Apple usually gets the credit because they tend to make the change across their entire line.
    I?ve been wanting to see this for some time now but this next revision seems to be the first time that it?s felt right. BTW, I quite like that HP Envy.





    YouTube is moving to 1080p and I suspect that 2010 will be a year of excessive tablets and media appliances. To me, this means that the online video stores will be offering 1080p video for the same prices as their 720p videos.





    Decent article about movies being sold online and as physical copies.



    Do you know something? I'm not happy with BluRay 1080p. For all the hype, when I look at it, I feel I'm going to just skip the whole buying BluRay discs thing. Digital downloads for much, much cheaper or wait for the movies on cable/satellite/streaming/etc.



    It's just me. I'll wait for BluRay 2K res, maybe with 3D, if I ever get around to my "home theatre".



    Maybe I'm just spoilt by playing too many of the latest games which, for realtime graphics at 1080p, are pretty darn impressive.



    Also, movies nowadays, just ain't the same... Just ain't the same like back in the 90's or early this decade.



    For example, I saw Twilight on standard def through my satellite TV provider. WHO THE HECK besides a die-hard fan would buy that on BluRay? A DVD's more than enough for that... Of course, the cinematography is pretty good, but that's about it.
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