Intel to apply Apple's App Store strategy with netbooks

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Intel this week released a beta software development kit to create applications for an iPhone App Store-like service, one that will come preinstalled on future Atom-powered netbooks.



Intel's product will reportedly follow the same business model as Apple's own App Store, leaving 70 percent of sales with the developer, and Intel taking a 30 percent cut to cover the costs associated with operations and partnerships, according to CNet. The Atom Developer Program SDK allows developers to build software for netbooks powered by Intel's Atom chip, whether they are running Windows or Intel's Moblin operating system.



"Consumer adoption of mobile computing and Atom-based netbooks is growing rapidly, and there is an immediate opportunity for developers to capitalize on the popularity of these small form-factor, on-the-go devices," said Renee James, corporate vice president and general manager with Intel's Software and Services Group. "We are excited about the innovation and energy from developers around creating applications and unlocking new uses for Atom platforms."



Much like Apple's App Store approval process, software created for Intel's Atom marketplace must be submitted for validation. Intel will then serve software for download to users of Atom-powered netbooks.







Given the extraordinary success of the iPhone App Store, producing more than 2 billion downloads through September, numerous competitors have looked to replicate Apple's success across a variety of business types. Intel is the latest in a line of companies in the "app store" business:



TV manufacturers and companies like Yahoo, Adobe and Roku hope to have cross-platform applications available for use on a variety of different sets. Currently, the Yahoo Widget Engine offers around 20 applications included with TV sets from a variety of manufacturers.



While not nearly as successful as Apple's App Store thus far, Google has offered the Android Marketplace on its Android-powered devices since the platform debuted, and the number of applications has been rapidly growing.



Microsoft introduced the Windows Marketplace for Mobile with the launch of Windows Mobile 6.5 in October. It debuted with 246 applications. In addition, Palm's WebOS and Nokia's Symbian Horizon are other competing options.



The largest wireless carrier in the U.S., Verizon, plans to create its own mandated application store for use on handsets that access its wireless network. The download destination would be run and maintained by Verizon itself.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Monkey see- monkey do?
  • Reply 2 of 44
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,157member
    Won't work!
  • Reply 3 of 44
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,675member
    Isn't the app store called "The Internet"??
  • Reply 4 of 44
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,157member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    Isn't the app store called "The Internet"??



    Or "Google"
  • Reply 5 of 44
    eehdeehd Posts: 137member
    Wow! I guess there is only one innovator in the market place...Apple; everyone else just follows.
  • Reply 6 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Do NetBooks need to fart?
  • Reply 7 of 44
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eehd View Post


    Wow! I guess there is only one innovator in the market place...Apple; everyone else just follows.



    I?m surprised some troll hasn?t completely missed the point and stated that Apple didn?t invent the App Store.
  • Reply 8 of 44
    Looks like they are copying the Linux Repository idea... only with this you have to pay for some Apps! (Knowing that a bunch of netbooks are sold with some flavor of Linux on them)



    Personally, I'm not a huge fan of the App Store with the "validation" system as part of it. Especially if it is the only way to get applications. Last thing I want is for Intel to lock down my netbook. Fortunately, a re-format and different OS can easily change that
  • Reply 9 of 44
    eehdeehd Posts: 137member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I’m surprised some troll hasn’t completely missed the point and stated that Apple didn’t invent the App Store.



    True, but Apple made it successful because of its user interface and low prices. You didn't see other businesses jumping on the band wagon prior to Apple's success, did you?
  • Reply 10 of 44
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Leaving aside Moblin, which AFAIK hasn't really done anything in the market, is the idea that developers will write netbook specific Windows apps? Which will differ from "Windows apps" how, exactly?
  • Reply 11 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I’m surprised some troll hasn’t completely missed the point and stated that Apple didn’t invent the App Store.



    Apple invented stores and retail in general - didn't you know that? And Al Gore invented the internet so then Apple invented that too cause he sits on their board.
  • Reply 12 of 44
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    Apple invented stores and retail in general - didn't you know that? And Al Gore invented the internet so then Apple invented that too cause he sits on their board.



    Pro-tip: for hyperbolic sarcasm to be marginally effective, it must bear some passing resemblance to reality.
  • Reply 13 of 44
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,352member
    The World's R&D Department and Ideas Factory ... AKA Apple.
  • Reply 14 of 44
    I thought the netbook sales pitch was that they could already run all the desktop software we already have?



    Is that *gasp!* not really true?
  • Reply 15 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Pro-tip: for hyperbolic sarcasm to be marginally effective, it must bear some passing resemblance to reality.



    Really? Says who?

    What kind of pro are you?
  • Reply 16 of 44
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    Really? Says who?

    What kind a pro are you?



    The fact that he isn't a troll puts him at least halfway there.
  • Reply 17 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Roc Ingersol View Post


    I thought the netbook sales pitch was that they could already run all the desktop software we already have?



    Is that *gasp!* not really true?



    Right- and Macs just work.
  • Reply 18 of 44
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Apple could easily counter this by adding a Mac App store to iTunes.



    But one thing that troubles me - the intense competition on the App Store has driven down app prices to unheard of low levels. Who would have thought a few years ago you could buy quite decent programs for only $1 or $2.



    But desktop computers have different kinds of apps. Many highly technical, and not really mass-market. Would an app store work for these? What would happen to prices? Don't you really want optical media for huge complex apps? It might work but it wouldn't work *as well.*
  • Reply 19 of 44
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    The fact that he isn't a troll puts him at least halfway there.



    He isn't? Is that because trolls can't be pompous?
  • Reply 20 of 44
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Pro-tip: for hyperbolic sarcasm to be marginally effective, it must bear some passing resemblance to reality.



    Or something so absurd that the very thought of it is funny.



    PS: Comedy has got to be one of the hardest professions. If it?s too obvious people won?t laugh, if it?s too esoteric people won?t get it. Sigh... I have always longed for better comedic timing.
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