Correct method to uninstall?

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I installed Perian the other day and decided I wanted to get rid of it. I just dragged the icon from applications as well as the dmg to the bin. Is that the correct method to 'uninstall' something?



After doing that I can still see Perian from the other section in settings as well as if I right click on a video it gives me settings for perian. How do I properly uninstall something and get rid of it from everywhere?



Thanks

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    When you install an app OSX installs a whole bunch of files in a whole bunch of places on your Mac. Only one of them in the Applications folder. So if you trash that one you don't trash all those other associated files (sometimes hundreds, or even thousands).

    If you want to delete an application and all its associated files use AppDelete.
  • Reply 2 of 15
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bavlondon2 View Post


    I installed Perian the other day and decided I wanted to get rid of it. ...



    If you want to uninstall Perian, then:
    • Launch System Preferences.

    • Click the Swiss Army knife icon to launch the Perian preferences pane.

    • Click the General tab.

    • Press the Remove Perian button.

    Done!
  • Reply 3 of 15
    Thanks I removed it from there but when I go back to settings I can still see Perian in the other section. Should it still be there?
  • Reply 4 of 15
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bavlondon2 View Post


    ... but when I go back to settings ...



    Which settings?
  • Reply 5 of 15
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    When you install an app OSX installs a whole bunch of files in a whole bunch of places on your Mac. Only one of them in the Applications folder. So if you trash that one you don't trash all those other associated files (sometimes hundreds, or even thousands).

    If you want to delete an application and all its associated files use AppDelete.



    I don't know about Perian, but OSX applications certainly don't do that as a rule. Normally OSX applications store everything where the application is installed, with the exception of a preference file, which is installed in Library/Preferences and sometimes support files in Library/Application Support. If you drag the application to the Trash you'll get rid of everything that really matters. The exception is applications that install kernel extensions, but these are relatively uncommon and the installer should remove them. Those third-party uninstallers aren't needed.
  • Reply 6 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Those third-party uninstallers aren't needed.



    Apparently you haven't used them much to uninstall. If you had you would know that many applications install dozens, sometimes even thousands, of associated files in just as many places (other than the Applications folder). If you only trash the relevant file in the Applications folder, all those other files stay behind, unneccessarily taking up space and complicating general processing.
  • Reply 7 of 15
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    Apparently you haven't used them much to uninstall. If you had you would know that many applications install dozens, sometimes even thousands, of associated files in just as many places (other than the Applications folder). If you only trash the relevant file in the Applications folder, all those other files stay behind, unneccessarily taking up space and complicating general processing.



    But they don't. Where is this documented? Keep in mind, applications are package files. They themselves can be composed of hundreds of files internally which you normally don't see. Literally, there aren't hundreds let alone thousands of places in OSX for installing things. Only the three I mentioned, and preferences and application support files are completely benign; they may take up space (usually, very little), but they complicate nothing because they are no longer used for anything.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    bbwibbwi Posts: 812member
    The rule of thumb I use is "uninstall the app the same way you installed it". If you just dragged the app into your Applications directory then its safe to just remove it from there. If you installed it using a pkg installer then use the same pkg to uninstall.



    I also use AppCleaner as an added bonus



    Here's a great little guide to help you



    http://guides.macrumors.com/Uninstal...ns_in_Mac_OS_X
  • Reply 9 of 15
    amoryaamorya Posts: 1,103member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bavlondon2 View Post


    Thanks I removed it from there but when I go back to settings I can still see Perian in the other section. Should it still be there?



    Perian has two parts: the quicktime codec itself (which is removed as described above), and the Preference Pane that controls it.



    To remove the latter, go to System Preferences, right click on the Perian icon, and choose Remove.



    Amorya
  • Reply 10 of 15
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    Apparently you haven't used them much to uninstall. If you had you would know that many applications install dozens, sometimes even thousands, of associated files in just as many places (other than the Applications folder). If you only trash the relevant file in the Applications folder, all those other files stay behind, unneccessarily taking up space and complicating general processing.



    A MacOS X application is a special kind of folder known as a bundle. It has a special structure, an .app extension, and its bundle bit set. With the exception of two or three files, all of those dozens, sometimes thousands of associated files, reside inside the application bundle which, in turn, is usually located in the Applications folder. As Dr Willmoss tried to explain to you, application files are not installed all over your system. The support files left behind after dragging your application bundle to the Trash are not executable. There is simply no way that they can adversely affect the performance of your system.



    Read and be wise.
  • Reply 11 of 15
    hudson1hudson1 Posts: 800member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


    A MacOS X application is a special kind of folder known as a bundle. It has a special structure, an .app extension, and its bundle bit set. With the exception of two or three files, all of those dozens, sometimes thousands of associated files, reside inside the application bundle which, in turn, is usually located in the Applications folder. As Dr Willmoss tried to explain to you, application files are not installed all over your system. The support files left behind after dragging your application bundle to the Trash are not executable. There is simply no way that they can adversely affect the performance of your system.



    Read and be wise.



    I think most here understand that. The problem is when you have a bad behaving application that you want to trash and re-install. It does little good to simply trash an application bundle and then putting a fresh version in since you have no idea if the source of difficulty is in the .app bundle or somewhere else (such as application support files or preference files). To be sure that you get a truly new install of an application, all of the peripheral files have to go along with the .app bundle.
  • Reply 12 of 15
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    FWIW, you can view the package contents of an application by right-clicking (or control-clicking) on the application and selecting "Show Package Contents." As an example, the GarageBand package contains 15,760 files.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post


    ... It does little good to simply trash an application bundle and then putting a fresh version in since you have no idea if the source of difficulty is in the .app bundle or somewhere else (such as application support files or preference files). ...



    Nonsense. If a preferences file causes problems, then you drag it to the Desktop. When launched again, the application automatically creates a new one. If the application runs OK, then you delete the old preferences file and get on with business.



    Lest we get too deep into the weeds here, a preferences file is one file, not dozens or thousands of files.
  • Reply 14 of 15
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    Apparently you haven't used them much to uninstall. If you had you would know that many applications install dozens, sometimes even thousands, of associated files in just as many places (other than the Applications folder). If you only trash the relevant file in the Applications folder, all those other files stay behind, unneccessarily taking up space and complicating general processing.



    What a bunch of horseshit. Most apps will write a plist in ~/Library/Preferences and that's about it. Trash the app and the plist file and you've removed 100% of most drag'n'drop installed apps. I have a new year resolution for you: shut up.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Wow, nice -- repeating everything that's been said already, but in a far more hostile manner.
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