Google reveals Nexus One for T-Mobile, Verizon: $529 contract free

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
As expected, customers can purchase a contract-free, unlocked Nexus One smartphone direct from Google for $529, or buy a subsidized handset through carrier T-Mobile for $179, the search giant announced Tuesday.



Through the Google Web store, customers will be able to buy a phone without service, or with service through a partner. Phones with a service contract will be offered at a subsidized, less expensive price. As of Tuesday, customers can purchase a phone only with T-Mobile, though that will soon change.



Google also plans to offer more Android-based devices to its online store in the future, for other carriers like Verizon Wireless (in the U.S.) and Vodafone (in Europe). The Nexus One will be available on both carriers in Spring 2010.



The Web site google.com/phone went live immediately following Tuesday's press conference. There, users can now purchase the Nexus One for T-Mobile U.S., or unlocked. Options for Verizon and Vodafone are grayed out, though those who "can't wait" for the Nexus One on Verizon are directed to a promotional Web site for the Motorola Droid.



Beyond that, more operators, countries and Android-based devices are planned to be sold from Google's online store. But Tuesday, most of the focus was on the company's custom-built handset.



Google worked closely with hardware maker HTC to design the Nexus One, which features a 3.7-inch AMOLED touchscreen. Though the phone can be purchased unsubsidized and unlocked through Google, the current GSM handset is only compatible with T-Mobile and AT&T in the U.S., and its 3G chip is not compatible with AT&T's high-speed wireless data network. A CDMA Verizon phone is due for a Spring 2010 release.







With the tagline "Web meets phone," the official unveiling of the Nexus One Tuesday brought to an end months of rumors that Google would release its own custom-built Android phone in early 2010. Those reports gained steam in December when the company issued unlocked GSM Nexus One phones to its employees.



The HTC-built device has a 1GHz Snapdragon CPU and 512MB of ROM and 512MB of RAM. It has a compass, GPS, light and proximity sensors, an accelerometer, and a 5-megapixel camera with LED flash. It also features an additional microphone on the back for noise cancellation. Google boasted that the handset is no thicker than a number two pencil, and no heavier than a Swiss Army knife.



Much like Apple users have been able to do with iPods for years, the Nexus One can also be custom engraved on the back for personalization.



The touchscreen device has no physical keyboard, only virtual, but offers a voice-to-text feature that allows users to dictate aloud for any text field on the device. The handset runs the unreleased Android 2.1 operating system, which has new home screen visual enhancements like animated and interactive desktop wallpaper. One early review noted that while the handset is a decent smartphone, it is not an "iPhone killer." Unlike the iPhone, it does not have multi-touch.







At its event Tuesday, Google highlighted the news and location-aware weather widgets from Android 2.1. It also demonstrated an animated wallpaper that allowed users to make ripples on water with their finger.



In an effort to calm some concerns that Google would be competing with its partners in the Android Open Handset Alliance, the Mountain View, Calif., company highlighted 13 new members that have joined the alliance Tuesday. The total number of OHA members is currently 52. In all, there are more than 20 Android devices on 59 carriers in 48 countries.



Google officials said they will focus on specific projects with partners, such as the Motorola Droid, to encourage innovation in the marketplace.



The availability of the Nexus One first on T-Mobile signifies the ongoing partnership between the nation's fourth-largest wireless carrier and Google. The first Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, debuted in Oct. 2008 with a $179 price tag.



Since the G1 debuted the Android platform, it has expanded to numerous devices, most notably the Motorola Droid. The Verizon-only handset launched in November to favorable reviews.



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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 118
    zindakozindako Posts: 468member
    This should be interesting.
  • Reply 2 of 118
    That does sound like a very good phone for the money. The only thing that now keeps Apple ahead is the ecosystem that it has with and around the iPhone (incl. iTunes, OSX, AppleTV etc). The 4th gen version had better be really good.



    Incidentally, I think that 'multitouch,' while nice, is over-rated. I don't think it will be a continued source of competitive advantage for Apple.
  • Reply 3 of 118
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,834member
    Looks like I'll probably give my money to Google this round. Can't wait for Apple to get out of it's lousy contract anymore.
  • Reply 4 of 118
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Looks like I'll probably give my money to Google this round. Can't wait for Apple to get out of it's lousy contract anymore.



    So you are saying you prefer T-Mobile coverage to AT&T's or is it just price? Because Verizon wouldn't be any cheaper if they had an iPhone. And of course there would be the simultaneous data & voice issue which may not be that big of a deal. My friend has a G1 on TM and the coverage is pretty poor except when in the city. In rural areas there is no signal apparently.
  • Reply 5 of 118
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Looks like I'll probably give my money to Google this round. Can't wait for Apple to get out of it's lousy contract anymore.



    'This round'???

    What do you guys do... buy a new phone every couple of weeks?

    Talk about fickle.

    I still haven't exploited all of my iPhone's capabilities.
  • Reply 6 of 118
    How many times has the iPhone been killed now?.....5?....6?



    Why would I want to pay full price? I'm going to pay the same monthly charges for either the locked or unlocked phone. I might as well have the carrier give me a discount. I have a month to test it out.
  • Reply 7 of 118
    Okay folks - like it or hate it, Google will have Apple getting a bit scared.



    Even if you're an Apple Fanboy/Fangirl and won't touch the N1 you won't be put off by what Apple will have to do to remain in the top seat.



    At last, here is the credible competition that should mean Apple will have to drive down their prices.



    I can't wait to see what Vodafone has to offer in the Spring time as this is when my phone contract is up - Bingo!



    By the way - here's one of my predictions - Google will have to bring out some sort of iTunes for the N1 to fully benefit from its multifunction capabilities!



    Get in there Google!
  • Reply 8 of 118
    caljomaccaljomac Posts: 122member
    I think I'm going to get one of these.....not as good as iPhone, of course but a bit more....budget friendly
  • Reply 9 of 118
    kozchriskozchris Posts: 209member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caljomac View Post


    I think I'm going to get one of these.....not as good as iPhone, of course but a bit more....budget friendly



    $20 bucks cheaper makes it budget friendly?
  • Reply 10 of 118
    Is it an surprise that phones are not $100? Smartphones cost money. Real money. Too many people, manly the US market, has been spoiled with subsidized phones. Try going to Europe, or The Mid East, or Asia where subsidized phones are not necessarily the norm. Phones typically cost ?400 -?600 (depending on the phone). Then complain. The choice is simple, either pay the full price and don't complain, or pay the subsidized price and don't complain. You can't have it both ways. I do understand that in some cases it is impossible to pay directly for the phone. Either way, complaining about it is not going to fix it.
  • Reply 11 of 118
    I don't think this looks as good as you guys do. $179 subsidized with T-Mobile is almost exactly the same as $199 on AT&T. T-Mobile has even worse coverage, and I'm in one of those good 3G spots with AT&T anyway.



    Also, I may be the only one, but I never saw the appeal in open source or in Android. Nothing is ever 100% open - and these platforms are rarely supported by any big developers, which means lower quality applications. Apple gives iPhone devs what they need to make good apps... And I understand their reasoning for keeping some things closed. I'm sure they'll figure out how to get multitasking up and running without draining too much battery, but the phone has always been fast enough that it never really mattered to me. And if somebody isn't okay with that, a short download and one click of the mouse will open up your iPhone anyway.
  • Reply 12 of 118
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    That does sound like a very good phone for the money. The only thing that now keeps Apple ahead is the ecosystem that it has with and around the iPhone (incl. iTunes, OSX, AppleTV etc). The 4th gen version had better be really good.



    I don?t see how it?s that nice for the money. It?s $19 cheaper than the iPhone 3GS under contract yet it has a little over 1/4 the NAND, only 512MB is on-board which makes the total NAND from the SD card slower than the faster NAND Apple added to the 3GS over the 3G. Sure it has some nice HW features besides that but the 3GS came out in June 2009. I?d wager that the display type and resolution will be upped considerably for this year?s iPhone.



    Quote:

    Incidentally, I think that 'multitouch,' while nice, is over-rated. I don't think it will be a continued source of competitive advantage for Apple.



    I don?t think multitouch is over-rated at all, but I haven?t seen anyone but Apple do it right. I couldn?t live without it on my iPhone or my MBP trackpad. it?s a time saver over any single-touch system. I don?t even want to image having to double click an image on a page to get a pop-up menu to choose to scale an image up or down instead of simply using pinch and zoom.
  • Reply 13 of 118
    postulantpostulant Posts: 1,270member
    The N1 doesn't have to kill the iPhone to succeed...
  • Reply 14 of 118
    awmawmawmawm Posts: 67member
    Does it has some better technical specs than the iPhone. Yes! Will this make me switch from my iPhone? Absolutely not. Nothing beats the ease of integration of the iPhone with my Address Book, ICal and iTunes. Pre-iPhone, I struggled long enough to keep my BlackBerry in sync. There is no way that I will go back to a similar trial and error sync experience that may work on paper but requires multiple tweaks. Nevertheless, I hope that plenty of people will jump on the Nexus to give Apple an incentive to update the specs on future iPhones...
  • Reply 15 of 118
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,070member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kozchris View Post


    $20 bucks cheaper makes it budget friendly?



    Especially if you have to add about 40-50 bucks for a 16 GB SD card to match the capacity...
  • Reply 16 of 118
    godriflegodrifle Posts: 266member
    A lot of build up for meh.
  • Reply 17 of 118
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,819member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GavinScrimgeour View Post


    Okay folks - like it or hate it, Google will have Apple getting a bit scared.



    I seriously doubt Apple is afraid of Google. If anything Google crapped its pants after hearing the news of Apple buying up that mobile ad network. I wouldn't be surprised if Apple even decides to create a search engine of its own on MobileMe to replace Google. Google is deciding to step into Apple's core business, hardware, Apple will have no choice but to step on Google as well. Google is making a lot of money off of Apple's platforms and we will begin to see a shift to more Apple services, backed by Apple owned ads. Also take into consideration the number of applications downloaded and how many of those are ad-supported. I'm sure there's a lot of potential profit slipping between Apple's fingers and they're dying to take control of that. They could make it dead simple for developers to add advertisements in their apps and then simply collect the money as they're clicked. They already have the payment system set up with developers.



    Also, Android isn't a threat to the iPhone, it is threat to Windows Mobile.
  • Reply 18 of 118
    asianbobasianbob Posts: 797member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I don?t think multitouch is over-rated at all, but I haven?t seen anyone but Apple do it right. I couldn?t live without it on my iPhone or my MBP trackpad. it?s a time saver over any single-touch system. I don?t even want to image having to double click an image on a page to get a pop-up menu to choose to scale an image up or down instead of simply using pinch and zoom.



    Where are you getting this pop-up thing from? I'm not saying it doesn't exist. Just that most smartphones I've used, double-tapping (or single tapping) just automatically zooms in on the text/picture to a level that quite easy to read.



    Only time pinch-zoom has failed me is when I was using my dad's iPhone on a family trip to FL over the last week. I was carrying something in my other hand so I had to resort to the double tap with the thumb of the hand carrying the iPhone. Lest I contort my hand funny, resulting in it dropping near an alligator... Being optimized for two-handed operation is pinch-zoom's only Archille's heel.
  • Reply 19 of 118
    rindrind Posts: 66member
    I carry two phone iPhone, and a work Provided T-Mobile phone.

    T-Mobile service is very Poor.



    If you aren't happy with the iPhone because of AT&T you certainly aren't going to be happy with T-Mobile service.



    Still using the 3G , in hopes there's something new this year from Apple
  • Reply 20 of 118
    neilmneilm Posts: 586member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Postulant View Post


    The N1 doesn't have to kill the iPhone to succeed...



    Yes, and in fact there's no such thing as an "iPhone killer," or a "Blackberry killer," etc. Use of those phrases is merely a symptom of lazy thinking, or shoddy journalism.



    As a very satisfied iPhone 3G owner who is unlikely to switch to another platform, I welcome quality competition that makes the next iPhone I buy likely to be that much more capable.
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