eWeeks 10 ten LAME iPad issues

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
And here we go



http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-...e-iPad-765718/





Quote:

1. "Where's the 3G iPad?" "Apple has only said that it will be made available in "late April.""





And so, what's the deal about that? Really, is this a "issue"?





Quote:

2. The 3G-pricing conundrum. Even AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said earlier this week that he believes the WiFi-only model will sell better, since folks don't want to pay for another subscription.



According to a poll I saw (if I remember where I'll post the link) the low end iPad and the high end iPad where the most chosen models.



There are several iPad versions and the one's that sell well will continue and others that don't won't.





Quote:

3. We need Flash



Discussed ad nauseous, I think once plug-in containment is perfected in Safari it will make a return to the iPad in some limited fashion. Like other browsers not being allowed on the App Store without some sort of plug-in crash protection.





Quote:

4. Displaying iPhone apps



Some customers might be disappointed when they start adding their favorite iPhone applications to the iPad, since many apps won't fit the iPad's screen



A temporary delay, those apps are already being reworked. Not a issue.





Quote:

5. Accessory pricing



Since the iPad lacks a USB port, users will be forced to buy accessories that can only connect through its dock. Unfortunately, Apple has been mum on accessory pricing. How much will that physical keyboard cost? What?s the prospective cost of other useful accessories? The company should let consumers know before the iPad is released.





Why scare off people? The ideal thing about the iPad is it's low entry cost and the ability to add things as you go. There will be less expensive third party options as usual.





Quote:

Apple needs to reassure those potential customers who worry that the iPad's software will be obsolete in just a few months that any updates to the iPhone OS will also be made available to the iPad. It might sound obvious to some, but a novice user might be concerned.



A novice doesn't know his/her ass from a hole in the ground to be concerned and the iPad will likely update itself, like the iPhone does. Not a issue.







Quote:

7. The Kindle competition



Although Apple is marketing its iPad as a replacement for the Amazon Kindle, the company still needs to be worried about Amazon. A backlit screen is not the best way to enjoy books. And although Apple's iBooks will offer color?a major omission in the Kindle?speculation abounds over a new version of Amazon's e-reader that will compete more effectively against the iPad. Apple needs to figure out its strategy for taking Amazon down before the iPad is released. Any missteps could see book lovers run back to the Kindle.



And how this a issue?



Yes the iPad's backlit screen and glossy finish is going to be much harder on people's eyes than the Kindle's screen. And who's to say the next Kindle won't have the same problems?



People will most likely apply a anti-glare film on their iPads before going back to the e-reader only Kindle, if they bothered to switch in the first place. After all the iPad is more than a e-reader.





Quote:

8. Connectivity



Apple's decision to forgo USB, FireWire, or any other kind of connectivity is a major issue. Apple wants the iPad to go along on trips or be used for those moments when users want to perform basic tasks. But what about those moments when users want to transfer files from an iPad to an iMac with the help of a USB key? It won't work with the iPad. That's a shame. Apple needs to find a way for users to connect peripherals they already own as soon as possible.



I'm sure there will be some sort of adapter for the iPad to connect USB keys, or directly hook up the iPad to computer the same way a iPod does. Not a issue.





Quote:

9. AT&T's network



Apple's decision to partner with AT&T for 3G connectivity is suspect. AT&T has had trouble accommodating all the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS users that have pelted its network. The company is currently investing heavily in infrastructure to address those issues. But with some iPad owners connecting to that same network, it might be tough for AT&T to keep up. Hopefully Apple has worked with AT&T to ensure its network is ready for the iPad 3G.





Poor AT&T, swamped with so much new business. I wish I had their problem. If they couldn't handle it, they wouldn't carry the iPad in the first place. Not a issue.





Quote:

10. No camera? Really?



Apple's decision to not include a camera in the iPad is a major omission. Part of the value of the iPhone is its ability to capture stills at moments when users don't have a camera readily available. Considering Apple is marketing the iPad as a mobile product, a camera would seem like an obvious inclusion in the device. And yet, it's not available in the iPad. Apple needs to find a way, likely through peripherals, to bring camera functionality to the iPad. It's a must-have that consumers will be missing.





Cameras in phones totally suck, it's got to have at least 5MP, a little zoom and flash to get a decent 8 x 10. So anything else is just a utility, so why include it and make everyone pay a lot more?



Most people say they hardly use the built in iSight camera in Mac's anyhow. If you need a camera, pay the $120 Kodak wants and get a nice 14 Megapixel camera with flash and zoom.



The 3G couldn't handle the iChat anyway most likely.



So there you are, pound away.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    piotpiot Posts: 1,346member
    You want to know why that's simply a bad article?



    Two words. Don Reisinger
  • Reply 2 of 6
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Most of the online tech "press" have devolved into click whoring bullshit-- the gear head equivalent of the National Enquirer.



    One sure sign that an article isn't worth bothering with is the "Top X Reasons For Contentious Assertion" format, or even just the "Is Something Sort of Outrageous Possibly True" gambit (which, by dint of being centered around a question, is free to sort of flop around without any supporting evidence whatsoever and simply go whole hog into specious libel mongering, i.e "Is Apple planning to kill us all in our sleep?").



    Moreover, I've noticed that even at fairly mainstream sites, these articles don't appear to have been copy edited in any way, and typically include not just typos but dropped words, sentence fragments, and the odd burst of completely unintelligible gibberish. Not to mention the factually incorrect stuff. Not to mention the simple bad writing.



    I enjoy keeping up with tech news, but I find I'm limiting myself more and more to a handful of sites that are some combination of smart, engaged, well written and reasonable. For my Mac fix I'll scan MacSurfer, but increasingly that's larded with obvious click bait, and I'll probably actually check fewer than one in twenty.
  • Reply 3 of 6
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post


    And here we go



    http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-...e-iPad-765718/











    And so, what's the deal about that? Really, is this a "issue"?









    According to a poll I saw (if I remember where I'll post the link) the low end iPad and the high end iPad where the most chosen models.



    There are several iPad versions and the one's that sell well will continue and others that don't won't.









    Discussed ad nauseous, I think once plug-in containment is perfected in Safari it will make a return to the iPad in some limited fashion. Like other browsers not being allowed on the App Store without some sort of plug-in crash protection.









    A temporary delay, those apps are already being reworked. Not a issue.











    Why scare off people? The ideal thing about the iPad is it's low entry cost and the ability to add things as you go. There will be less expensive third party options as usual.









    A novice doesn't know his/her ass from a hole in the ground to be concerned and the iPad will likely update itself, like the iPhone does. Not a issue.











    And how this a issue?



    Yes the iPad's backlit screen and glossy finish is going to be much harder on people's eyes than the Kindle's screen. And who's to say the next Kindle won't have the same problems?



    People will most likely apply a anti-glare film on their iPads before going back to the e-reader only Kindle, if they bothered to switch in the first place. After all the iPad is more than a e-reader.









    I'm sure there will be some sort of adapter for the iPad to connect USB keys, or directly hook up the iPad to computer the same way a iPod does. Not a issue.











    Poor AT&T, swamped with so much new business. I wish I had their problem. If they couldn't handle it, they wouldn't carry the iPad in the first place. Not a issue.











    Cameras in phones totally suck, it's got to have at least 5MP, a little zoom and flash to get a decent 8 x 10. So anything else is just a utility, so why include it and make everyone pay a lot more?



    Most people say they hardly use the built in iSight camera in Mac's anyhow. If you need a camera, pay the $120 Kodak wants and get a nice 14 Megapixel camera with flash and zoom.



    The 3G couldn't handle the iChat anyway most likely.



    So there you are, pound away.



    Most People want Live Video Chat. The problem is that like most people they tend to chat in low light conditions and well the iSight Camera as you may all know sucks when there is like very little light. It picks up nothing.
  • Reply 4 of 6
    talksense101talksense101 Posts: 1,737member
    Also, I thought the iPad allows iPhone apps to scale up to fit full screen even if they are not designed for it.
  • Reply 5 of 6
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by talksense101 View Post


    Also, I thought the iPad allows iPhone apps to scale up to fit full screen even if they are not designed for it.



    Its does, they do...
  • Reply 6 of 6
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,125member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Most of the online tech "press" have devolved into click whoring bullshit-- the gear head equivalent of the National Enquirer.



    One sure sign that an article isn't worth bothering with is the "Top X Reasons For Contentious Assertion" format, or even just the "Is Something Sort of Outrageous Possibly True" gambit (which, by dint of being centered around a question, is free to sort of flop around without any supporting evidence whatsoever and simply go whole hog into specious libel mongering, i.e "Is Apple planning to kill us all in our sleep?").



    Moreover, I've noticed that even at fairly mainstream sites, these articles don't appear to have been copy edited in any way, and typically include not just typos but dropped words, sentence fragments, and the odd burst of completely unintelligible gibberish. Not to mention the factually incorrect stuff. Not to mention the simple bad writing.



    I enjoy keeping up with tech news, but I find I'm limiting myself more and more to a handful of sites that are some combination of smart, engaged, well written and reasonable. For my Mac fix I'll scan MacSurfer, but increasingly that's larded with obvious click bait, and I'll probably actually check fewer than one in twenty.



    QFFT



    Journalism is dead dead dead
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