Does this resolution make sense

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Does everyone think it is probable that the new iphones released in June would

have the exact same resolution as the ipad(1024-by-768) simply to make things

easier for developers or has scaling gotten good enough to where it really does not matter, I mean even if they did this new apps would still have to be scaled down to be compatible with the earlier iphones, Just trying to get a handle on this from the experts so I could start guessing like everyone else lol

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    outsideroutsider Posts: 6,008member
    I think iPad resolution on a 3.5" screen is too dense. Assuming they keep the same aspect ratio as the current iPhone, these are the possible permutations:



    600 x 400

    660 x 440

    690 x 460

    720 x 480 *

    780 x 520

    840 x 560

    900 x 600 *

    960 x 640



    * = most likely, IMO
  • Reply 2 of 7
    mode 5mode 5 Posts: 59member
    Going back a bit AI published a patent filing by Apple that had a form of light pipe camera embedded between the pixels of a display so that video chat was more or less eye to eye. The double resolution may have something to do with the forward facing camera.
  • Reply 3 of 7
    carniphagecarniphage Posts: 1,984member
    The easiest solution for developers (and for backward compatibility) is a simple doubling of the current iPhone resolution in both X and Y.



    So 960x640 makes the most sense. A simple quadrupling of the pixel count. It would increase the amount of information displayed, while allowing older software to run at 480x320 unaware of the new format. The legacy software would work with no scaling artefacts at all.



    If Apple were to step-up the pixel density on the iPhone. Then this format would offer the simplest path.



    For me personally, such a display would be capable of displaying too much information. A display like this would be capable of rendering text too small to actually read without magnification.



    C.
  • Reply 4 of 7
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


    For me personally, such a display would be capable of displaying too much information. A display like this would be capable of rendering text too small to actually read without magnification.



    C.



    The iPhone can already do that. That's why they came up with these wonderful pinch or tap to zoom features.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    carniphagecarniphage Posts: 1,984member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by infinitespecter View Post


    The iPhone can already do that. That's why they came up with these wonderful pinch or tap to zoom features.



    My point is that displaying data at resolutions beyond that of human vision has little practical benefit.



    Most 1080p TVs, for instance, are viewed from a distance that nullifies the benefit of the additional detail.



    You can quadruple the pixel density of the display. But I am not sure many people will actually notice the slight improvement in sharpness.



    C.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,785member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


    My point is that displaying data at resolutions beyond that of human vision has little practical benefit.



    This is true however there is an extremely wide variation in what people can see. Even more so how the perceive what they see.

    Quote:



    Most 1080p TVs, for instance, are viewed from a distance that nullifies the benefit of the additional detail.



    I have to ask have you actually looked at a 1080P HDTV running side by side with a 720P TV viewing the same content? The difference can be dramatic. In part because the experience doesn't have anything to do with detail. If detail where important we would all be within 2 feet of the screen.

    Quote:



    You can quadruple the pixel density of the display. But I am not sure many people will actually notice the slight improvement in sharpness.



    C.



    Who says the screen has to get sharper? It could just get bigger. In fact that is likely highly desirable as the pixels become very large on big screen TV's



    Lets step back a moment and look at the smaller screens. As you note people can't resolve the pixels now but yet everybody is left with the impression that the higher density displays look better. Why is that if people can't resolve the pixels? I will offer up that there is more to it than a not seeing the perceiving the pixels. It has a lot to do with making it easier for the mind to blend the colors.



    In any event a device like an iPhone or even the new tablets have one big issue that works counter to ever smaller pixels. That is maintaining daylight readability which is directly related to back light intensity and the ability to get that light through the pixels. This is one issue that seems to be ignored with most cell phones and portable devices these days. The units need enough brightness to be able to operating them in the middle of the day, yet many models fail massively in this regard.



    Dave
  • Reply 7 of 7
    carniphagecarniphage Posts: 1,984member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    This is true however there is an extremely wide variation in what people can see. Even more so how the perceive what they see.



    Not so. For people with perfect vision, the cell-density on the retina determines a limit to perception. It's biology.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    I have to ask have you actually looked at a 1080P HDTV running side by side with a 720P TV viewing the same content? The difference can be dramatic. In part because the experience doesn't have anything to do with detail. If detail where important we would all be within 2 feet of the screen.



    Of course I have compared the two. I work with images.

    But at typical viewing distances of 10feet or more - and typical sceen-sizes - the difference is simply not perceptible to human vision. A 46" inch screen at 10feet barely resolves a 720p

    image on the retina.







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    Lets step back a moment and look at the smaller screens. As you note people can't resolve the pixels now but yet everybody is left with the impression that the higher density displays look better. Why is that if people can't resolve the pixels? I will offer up that there is more to it than a not seeing the perceiving the pixels. It has a lot to do with making it easier for the mind to blend the colors.



    It's not the mind blending the colors - it's the imperfect optics in the eye.

    I don't doubt that for people who can focus down to 12", they will be able to see some benefit of a 300ppi screen. But for people holding the screen at 2 feet. The difference will negligible.



    But much nonsense is spoken about resolution. And the geek mantra that bigger numbers = better experience really does not hold up to double-blind trials.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    In any event a device like an iPhone or even the new tablets have one big issue that works counter to ever smaller pixels. That is maintaining daylight readability which is directly related to back light intensity and the ability to get that light through the pixels. This is one issue that seems to be ignored with most cell phones and portable devices these days. The units need enough brightness to be able to operating them in the middle of the day, yet many models fail massively in this regard.

    Dave



    There we can agree. Real phones get used outdoors, where any kind of back-lit screen has to compete with daylight.



    C.
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