Oracle Sues Google Over Android

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
http://www.mercurynews.com/top-stories/ci_15762198



Quote:

In a clash of two Silicon Valley titans, Oracle said Thursday that it has filed a federal copyright lawsuit alleging that Google's popular Android operating system was built on Oracle's Java software without permission.



Android, which was first released in late 2008, is used by several computer manufacturers as the operating system that runs smartphones and other computing devices. Oracle's lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for Northern California, accuses Google of infringing on patents and copyrights that Oracle acquired when it bought Sun Microsystems earlier this year.



It's unknown if this will have an immediate positive effect on iPhone sales, but who knows?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    Didn't Sun release Java under the GPL2 license? Also, the runtime engine in Android isn't a pure Java runtime. It is a variant called dex.



    Oracle can go fuck itself for all I care.
  • Reply 2 of 10
    Perhaps Larry Ellison's recent defense of Steve Jobs (when he spoke of Mark Hurd's departure at HP) goes deeper than it first seems. Could be a nascent Oracle+Apple deal and they both see the value in cutting Google/Android off at the knees.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by talksense101 View Post


    Didn't Sun release Java under the GPL2 license? Also, the runtime engine in Android isn't a pure Java runtime. It is a variant called dex.



    Oracle can go fuck itself for all I care.



    No. They released it under the SUN COMMUNITY SOURCE LICENSE



    Quote:

    ATTACHMENT D COMMERCIAL USE LICENSE



    [Contact Sun Microsystems For Commercial Use Terms and Conditions]



    You can bet that part says if you make money off it, me make money off it too. Only fair.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Perhaps Larry Ellison's recent defense of Steve Jobs (when he spoke of Mark Hurd's departure at HP) goes deeper than it first seems. Could be a nascent Oracle+Apple deal and they both see the value in cutting Google/Android off at the knees.



    Or he just doesn't like Squirrel-Boy, and sees an opportunity to cause Squirrel-Boy difficulty while indirectly helping his buddy Steve.
  • Reply 5 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    Or he just doesn't like Squirrel-Boy, and sees an opportunity to cause Squirrel-Boy difficulty while indirectly helping his buddy Steve.



    Actually, he looks more like Mister Peabody... or Sherman ...



  • Reply 6 of 10
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    I see you don't find yourself part of the long term Fake Steve followers! That's where squirrel-boy comes from and has more to do with his twitchy movements than just his appearance.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    No. They released it under the SUN COMMUNITY SOURCE LICENSE







    You can bet that part says if you make money off it, me make money off it too. Only fair.



    The Ars Technica article makes it clear. Link
  • Reply 8 of 10
    You're wrong. Java has been open sourced under GPL2, with exemptions such as the sun. packages and the browser plugin.



    But here's the rub: Java is patented in such a way that only a complete implementation is licensed royalty-free, not a superset or a subset.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    No. They released it under the SUN COMMUNITY SOURCE LICENSE







    You can bet that part says if you make money off it, me make money off it too. Only fair.



  • Reply 9 of 10
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JavaCowboy View Post


    You're wrong. Java has been open sourced under GPL2, with exemptions such as the sun. packages and the browser plugin.



    But here's the rub: Java is patented in such a way that only a complete implementation is licensed royalty-free, not a superset or a subset.



    A VERSION of Java was GPL2 licensed. Current releases are under the Sun Community Source License. Lot's of people thought Sun put everything into GPL, but they actually put very little into GPL licensed code relative to the whole of the Java universe.



    Java Mobile Edition was NEVER GPL'ed, it has only ever been under SCSL. This happens to be part of Googles major trouble here as the patent problems are clearly in Oracle's favor because GPL2 never touched that part of the Java spec. To me it looks like there was either some very sloppy lawyering on the Android side of things or Google just decided to press forward despite potential licensing show-stoppers.



    If you use and make money on other peoples open source code commercially, you go deep on the lawyering, or else. The licenses are pretty specific and don't automagically grant the rest of the world everything related to the released code for free too.
  • Reply 10 of 10
    Wrong again. The compiler, runtime and standard libraries were all open sourced, with the exception of the Java applet runtime and some sun. libraries. The version of Java distributed by Oracle is binary that includes source code that developers can use for debugging within an IDE, but the openjdk codebase is open source and is available to download. That's the JDK that Red Hat and the other Linux distros distribute. That version has passed the TCK and had been blessed by Sun as a proper Java distribution, so your claim that Sun "put very little into GPL licensed code" is patently false.



    Also, Sun did GPL2 JME. They just didn't add the classpath exemption that they added for the desktop/server edition of Java. This means that any code written with JME must be GPL'd as well. Anybody developing against JME will obviously pay Oracle rather than GPL their code.



    Get your facts straight!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    A VERSION of Java was GPL2 licensed. Current releases are under the Sun Community Source License. Lot's of people thought Sun put everything into GPL, but they actually put very little into GPL licensed code relative to the whole of the Java universe.



    Java Mobile Edition was NEVER GPL'ed, it has only ever been under SCSL. This happens to be part of Googles major trouble here as the patent problems are clearly in Oracle's favor because GPL2 never touched that part of the Java spec. To me it looks like there was either some very sloppy lawyering on the Android side of things or Google just decided to press forward despite potential licensing show-stoppers.



    If you use and make money on other peoples open source code commercially, you go deep on the lawyering, or else. The licenses are pretty specific and don't automagically grant the rest of the world everything related to the released code for free too.



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