Google looks to upstage Apple with new Google TV content teasers

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Google on Monday looked to stir up excitement over its forthcoming Android-powered Google TV platform -- and temper demand for Apple's rival offering -- by previewing a portion of the content arsenal its building with the help of its media partners.



The announcements comes on the heels of Apple's rollout of the second-generation Apple TV last week, which has been met with lukewarm reviews, primarily due to its limited content offerings that stem from the reluctance of network television providers to embrace the company's new 99 cent rental model.



As with its Android smartphones, Google TV hardware will not be made by the search giant. Instead, hardware partners and HDTV makers will create devices that will run the company's flavor of Android for TVs.



Announcing its plans for the platform back in May, Google argued that today's television experience is too complicated for consumers, with too many channels and a poor interface for finding the shows they want to watch. As such, the company asserted that many consumers wind up watching videos on the Web, because it's much easier to find what they're looking for and watch it on their own schedule.



Therefore, Google's plan was to funnel most of that available web video content to TV watchers through a proprietary interface, which would meld its own search technology with a version of its Chrome Web browser, rather than strike individual content deals with providers like Apple does. Still, this approach seemed to spook content providers in the same way that Apple's 99 rental model has, generating some opposition from companies who felt the model would similarly threaten to cannibalize sales of their existing cable TV businesses.



With its announcements Monday, Google appears to have tweaked its game plan slightly to further appease concerned partners, and has begun working with them on Google TV-optimized websites that will allow those partners to "personalize, monetize and distribute their content in new ways," affording them more flexibility over revenue generation.



"Most [?] partner sites already work with Google TV, but many are choosing to further enhance their premium web content for viewing on the television," the search giant said. "Today, we?re excited to announce several of these content partners:"

Turner Broadcasting has been hard at work optimizing some of their most popular websites for viewing on Google TV, including TBS, TNT, CNN, Cartoon Network and Adult Swim, available anytime through Google TV.

NBC Universal has collaborated with Google TV to bring CNBC Real-Time, an application that allows you to track your favorite stocks and access news feeds while enjoying the best financial news from CNBC directly on the TV screen.

HBO will bring access to hundreds of hours of programming to Google TV with HBO GO. Authenticated subscribers will soon be able to access all of their favorite HBO content on-demand in an enhanced website for Google TV.

NBA has built NBA Game Time, an application that lets you follow game scores in real-time and catch up on the latest highlights from your favorite team in HD.

Additionally, Google said it's partnered with some of the leading premium content providers to bring thousands of movie and TV titles, on-demand, directly to consumers television sets. Amazon Video On Demand, for example, will offer access to over 75,000 titles for rental or purchase, and Netflix will offer the ability to instantly watch unlimited movies and TV shows, anytime, streaming directly to the TV.







Additionally, Google also said its been working with some leading technology and media companies to optimize their content for Google TV, including news sites like The New York Times and USA Today; music sites like VEVO, Pandora and Napster; information networks like Twitter; and online networks like blip.tv.



The first devices powered by Google TV remain on track to ship this month from Sony (Internet TV and Blu-ray Player) and Logitech (companion box), and Google promises news on more Google TV-friendly websites in the coming weeks.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 129
    cimcim Posts: 197member
    Lame.
  • Reply 2 of 129
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,326member
    The best way to temper demand for a competitors product is to ship your own, better version
  • Reply 3 of 129
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    I'm trying to objectively look at the items announced...



    * Turner Broadcasting has been hard at work optimizing some of their most popular websites for viewing on Google TV, including TBS, TNT, CNN, Cartoon Network and Adult Swim, available anytime through Google TV.



    - What would Turner's motive be in dealing exclusively with Google instead of Apple? I don't see one, and believe that any such content will be available through Apple as well.

    No net advantage



    * NBC Universal has collaborated with Google TV to bring CNBC Real-Time, an application that allows you to track your favorite stocks and access news feeds while enjoying the best financial news from CNBC directly on the TV screen.



    - Big 'nothing' here. CNBC Real-Time has been available on iOS all along, and CNBC only offers real-time streaming of the actual network via its crappy CNBC+ service... (Windows Media only.)

    No net advantage



    * HBO will bring access to hundreds of hours of programming to Google TV with HBO GO. Authenticated subscribers will soon be able to access all of their favorite HBO content on-demand in an enhanced website for Google TV.



    - If I already subscribe to HBO, why would I need to insert a GoogleTV into the stream to... what? Time shift? DVR does that, as does OnDemand.

    Watch on my phone? I supposed, but hardly a killer app.

    No net advantage



    * NBA has built NBA Game Time, an application that lets you follow game scores in real-time and catch up on the latest highlights from your favorite team in HD.



    - Again, NBA has no more incentive to support Google over Apple than does Turner.

    No net advantage



    My personal bet is that Apple will think things through better than Google, and not just throw spaghetti at the wall and call it beta.

    But time will tell.
  • Reply 4 of 129
    I really do not want to go on the internet on my tv. period. Apps that do tv content might be interesting but honestly I can't think of other apps that I would want on my tv if I have a laptop or an ipad. The tv is the place where people want to do as little work as possible. Youtube is worth it because the content is worth the work. For the average person I do not see a reason got gtv and therefore I do not see this being the huge tech people want it to be.
  • Reply 5 of 129
    mgl323mgl323 Posts: 247member
    Can?t TV just be for watching TV? I mean, if I wanted to check stocks, game scores, play music through the TV, why not just check your smartphone to see those updates? Why not just plug (or use bluetooth) in your mp3 or smartphone directly into the surround sound system? The only good option that I see is the amazon movie market and netflix.
  • Reply 6 of 129
    .



    It looks pretty good -- but like the PlayBook video, it was all mockup.



    I have a Mini attached to my Sony Bravia 46" TV. The screen size is set as either 1080P TV, 1600 x 900 0r 1344 x 756.



    The display when used as a computer works best at 1080P or 1600 x 900.



    However, it is very difficult to read as a computer screen -- especially web sites.



    My 24" iMac has a resolution of 1920 x 1200.



    There is no comparison viewing a web site on the TV vs the Computer -- no matter how near or far away, the TV pales in comparison.



    To Google's credit, they are attempting to do something about this, that should benefit any web page viewed on a TV:



    -- Working with content providers to optimize their web sires

    -- Publishing guidelines for TV-Friendly Web site design



    http://code.google.com/tv/web/docs/o...ion_guide.html



    Just like we see web pages optimized for mobile, I think we'll see web pages optimized for TV.





    In Google's teaser I didn't see anything particularly compelling, though ir was nice. The apps are just different flavors of content-streaming Jello.



    .
  • Reply 7 of 129
    kotatsukotatsu Posts: 1,010member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bcahill009 View Post


    I really do not want to go on the internet on my tv. period. Apps that do tv content might be interesting but honestly I can't think of other apps that I would want on my tv if I have a laptop or an ipad. The tv is the place where people want to do as little work as possible. Youtube is worth it because the content is worth the work. For the average person I do not see a reason got gtv and therefore I do not see this being the huge tech people want it to be.



    Here's why you need apps - so content providers can add their own content without having to go through Apple. In the US Apple have integrated Netflix, well that's great for US customers, but for everyone else, about as useful as a chocolate teapot.



    If the Apple TV supported apps we could get a BBC iPlayer app, a Channel 4 On Demand app, a LoveFilm app (poor UK equivalent of Netflix), and so on. Instead we get absolutely nothing.



    Beyond simple streaming apps you could add the likes of VLC to play non-Apple video formats (it's already on the iPad), Last FM, Spotify, Pandora, etc. Then you could add web site apps reformatted for the TV screen - Engadget, IGN, The Guardian, BBC NEWS etc.



    Then you throw in Twitter and Facebook.



    So I can see a very good case for Apps on the TV, and I think many others will too.
  • Reply 8 of 129
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,244member
    At least we are guaranteed Google isn't going to try and pull some bullshit like this.
  • Reply 9 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post


    Here's why you need apps - so content providers can add their own content without having to go through Apple. In the US Apple have integrated Netflix, well that's great for US customers, but for everyone else, about as useful as a chocolate teapot.



    If the Apple TV supported apps we could get a BBC iPlayer app, a Channel 4 On Demand app, a LoveFilm app (poor UK equivalent of Netflix), and so on. Instead we get absolutely nothing.



    Beyond simple streaming apps you could add the likes of VLC to play non-Apple video formats (it's already on the iPad), Last FM, Spotify, Pandora, etc. Then you could add web site apps reformatted for the TV screen - Engadget, IGN, The Guardian, BBC NEWS etc.



    Then you throw in Twitter and Facebook.



    So I can see a very good case for Apps on the TV, and I think many others will too.



    Please reread my post. I said "Apps that do tv content might be interesting" I guess I should say it cleaner, apps that are rich in content which require people to do very little ie. tv, videos, music ect. will be nice, but apps like twitter, facebook, web browsing are things people like to do with privacy so unless you live by yourself it seems like a good idea at first but I guarantee will not work well for most. I do agree that content without providers would be nice and is the future but we are far from this and google tv will not break this mold in the slightest bit.
  • Reply 10 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post


    Here's why you need apps - so content providers can add their own content without having to go through Apple. In the US Apple have integrated Netflix, well that's great for US customers, but for everyone else, about as useful as a chocolate teapot.



    If the Apple TV supported apps we could get a BBC iPlayer app, a Channel 4 On Demand app, a LoveFilm app (poor UK equivalent of Netflix), and so on. Instead we get absolutely nothing.



    Beyond simple streaming apps you could add the likes of VLC to play non-Apple video formats (it's already on the iPad), Last FM, Spotify, Pandora, etc. Then you could add web site apps reformatted for the TV screen - Engadget, IGN, The Guardian, BBC NEWS etc.



    Then you throw in Twitter and Facebook.



    So I can see a very good case for Apps on the TV, and I think many others will too.



    For me, you got it in a nutshell! Content consumption has changed and the first group of greedy buggers in suits to realise this, will be the winners - and lead the way...
  • Reply 11 of 129
    iguesssoiguessso Posts: 132member
    Hmmm, some of the "I don't need that on my TV" viewpoints are strangely reminiscent of iPad prerelease. \



    I've had an HTPC in the living room for years. It's powerful and liberating to have the full internet available. The biggest problem is the same problem you see when you try to shoehorn Windows 7 onto a tablet - the interface was not designed for that medium.



    Google TV having a full browser: awesome if websites recognize and optimize for it, just like they do for mobile versions now. That's the killer feature IMO.
  • Reply 12 of 129
    dilliodillio Posts: 106member
    This is actually pretty good. It's been tried before, correct, but so have other things been tried before when their time just wasn't right (remember the Apple MessagePad?)



    The idea I think is pretty good: you have the best screen in the house, and it's under-used.



    Apple TV comes up short, because it can't make Apple enough profit margins. But that doesn't mean Google TV is not a good idea. Google makes their money indirectly, in a different way than Apple.
  • Reply 13 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gearhunter View Post


    For me, you got it in a nutshell! Content consumption has changed and the first group of greedy buggers in suits to realise this, will be the winners - and lead the way...



    I think this a very simple statement for a situation that is very complex. The "greedy buggers in suits" have most likely been looking at this for some time and obviously they do not have a solution yet.
  • Reply 14 of 129
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,511member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    I'm trying to objectively look at the items announced...



    I'm not inclined to view the Google TV as much of a threat, but I'll answer your questions as a devil's advocate exercise...



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    * Turner Broadcasting has been hard at work optimizing some of their most popular websites for viewing on Google TV, including TBS, TNT, CNN, Cartoon Network and Adult Swim, available anytime through Google TV.



    - What would Turner's motive be in dealing exclusively with Google instead of Apple? I don't see one, and believe that any such content will be available through Apple as well.

    No net advantage



    Well, one of the things that most networks objected to was Apple's demand of a 99 cent price point for rented TV shows. Perhaps Google has no such demand and Turner is happy going with them but not with Apple. Possible advantage for Google TV.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    * NBC Universal has collaborated with Google TV to bring CNBC Real-Time, an application that allows you to track your favorite stocks and access news feeds while enjoying the best financial news from CNBC directly on the TV screen.



    - Big 'nothing' here. CNBC Real-Time has been available on iOS all along, and CNBC only offers real-time streaming of the actual network via its crappy CNBC+ service... (Windows Media only.)

    No net advantage



    Agreed. No net advantage.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    * HBO will bring access to hundreds of hours of programming to Google TV with HBO GO. Authenticated subscribers will soon be able to access all of their favorite HBO content on-demand in an enhanced website for Google TV.



    - If I already subscribe to HBO, why would I need to insert a GoogleTV into the stream to... what? Time shift? DVR does that, as does OnDemand.

    Watch on my phone? I supposed, but hardly a killer app.



    Well, some people don't have DVR's for whatever reason (even though they can pay a little more for a cable box that includes one) and some cable companies don't offer HBO on demand. Also, you may not want to watch HBO on your phone, but I would think that it might be a good idea to be able to get that content on a tablet, when on travel for instance. I can't say that either of these would be a prime feature. So I agree that this isn't a "killer app".



    But I can give Google TV a small nod for this. If other premium channels do the same, the advantage materializes.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    * NBA has built NBA Game Time, an application that lets you follow game scores in real-time and catch up on the latest highlights from your favorite team in HD.



    - Again, NBA has no more incentive to support Google over Apple than does Turner.

    No net advantage



    Again, you don't know what the terms of negotiation are, so you have no idea whether NBA might support Google but not Apple.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    My personal bet is that Apple will think things through better than Google, and not just throw spaghetti at the wall and call it beta.



    In principle I agree.



    But here's the thing... the biggest problem with Apple TV is a lack of content, and according to the networks, the terms are the main obstacle. If Google is more flexible than Apple, then it could move in front in terms of content. And with the consumer, that may trump everything else.





    Thompson
  • Reply 15 of 129
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,511member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bcahill009 View Post


    I think this a very simple statement for a situation that is very complex. "greedy buggers in suits" have most likely been looking at this for some time and obviously they do not have a solution yet.



    Well, yes, but half of those people are still trying to "fight the unstoppable truck". If they took the bold step of getting on the truck and trying to steer it, well, the best driver will win. It's a risky and scary ride, and not everyone can win.



    It will take a while for the race to be decided.



    Thompson
  • Reply 16 of 129
    rbonnerrbonner Posts: 635member
    I thought it looked good right up to twitter, not really wanting twitter on my TV. It looks like as usual, content agreements will control this market.
  • Reply 17 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mgl323 View Post


    The only good option that I see is the amazon movie market and netflix.



    Agreed. And both of those are available through just about every Blu-ray player on the market.



    That's my main gripe with Apple TV: It does no more than my Blu-ray + my Comcast box without allowing me to get rid of either or both of them. Apple TV would give me content that ports to iPhone/iPad, but that's not much because I don't need Apple TV to download a TV show through iTunes to watch on an iPhone/iPad; I don't care that I could watch the same show on my HDTV with Apple TV because I can already watch that show on my HDTV.



    I would love to have the shows I watch come delivered through a great, functional Apple UI, and I would pay a lot for that if it allowed me to drop my cable, but I'm not going to pay Comcast and Apple for the same content.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thompr View Post


    Well, yes, but half of those people are still trying to "fight the unstoppable truck". If they took the bold step of getting on the truck and trying to steer it, well, the best driver will win. It's a risky and scary ride, and not everyone can win.



    I think it would make a lot of sense for Apple to work with the cable carriers to design and deliver a better TV experience the same way that Apple worked with AT&T to design and deliver a better mobile phone experience.



    The networks are not going to get on board with a content subscription that allows you to bypass cable; there are too many overlaps among the various content providers, cable networks, and local cable providers for the content providers to commit to a plan that would guarantee a move away from the cable subscriptions that provide much of the entire industry's revenue.



    If Apple wants to be a player in TV, they're going to have to work within the current business model and get a piece of the recurring subscriber revenue by adding value to what's already there.
  • Reply 18 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iGuessSo View Post


    Hmmm, some of the "I don't need that on my TV" viewpoints are strangely reminiscent of iPad prerelease. \



    I've had an HTPC in the living room for years. It's powerful and liberating to have the full internet available. The biggest problem is the same problem you see when you try to shoehorn Windows 7 onto a tablet - the interface was not designed for that medium.



    Google TV having a full browser: awesome if websites recognize and optimize for it, just like they do for mobile versions now. That's the killer feature IMO.





    I believe there is a need to access the web on behalf of the TV -- search for content, schedules, background info, drill-down, etc.



    But, I don't think I want to see all of this activity on the TV screen-- it's too hard to read, includes intrusive ads, contains userids / passwords, and adds nothing to the TV viewing experience. Rather, I'd like to use an iPad as both the Remote KB and Remote Web display, then have the TV display the content after it has been located.



    The only exception to this, I can think of, is If I want to train others on how to use the remote to access the web-- in that usage the iPad screen could show as a PIP on the TV along with the web pages.



    .
  • Reply 19 of 129
    Being an apple tv 1st gen. owner I think I have been able to take from that and think about what more a 2nd device could do. And I honestly think the atv with airplay is it. This is because I want a device so I can rent movies, and stream music. That's about it. Airplay would allow me to search and discover on a keyboard with my computer and if I find I need to see it on a bigger screen I could do that.



    Tv is still better provided by a cable company no matter what you want to say.

    1. It is constant content instead of static like on an atv.

    2. Live Programming.

    3. The ability to find a new show. I can flip channels see something that peaks my interest and then choose to watch it or not. In an atv or gtv world I would probably have to read about new shows or watch trailers. Neither sound much fun.



    Internet belongs on computers and mobile devices not tv's. I once made my 42" into a computer. And thats what it was a computer hooked up to a tv. I took it down in a week because a computer requires the user to know what they want to do where a tv allows the person to just consume without any more thought. And to be honest most people enjoy vegging out sometimes and for the last 60 years or so the tv has provided this for us.
  • Reply 20 of 129
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    Google to Apple: "We intend to kick your ass up and down with Google TV!"



    Apple to Google: "So?"



    Google: "???. We'll do it! We really, really will! Just you wait and see!"



    Apple: "Oh."
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