Apple relaxing repair policy for iPods with triggered liquid sensors

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Apple appears to be relaxing its repair policy on iPods whose internal sensors indicate possible water damage by authorizing its service providers to make repairs to the device under warranty in some cases.



All of the Cupertino-based company's mobile products -- including iPhones, iPads, iPods, and MacBooks -- contain one or more LSIs (Liquid Submersion Indicators) or LCIs (Liquid Contact Indicator) that turn from white (or silver) to a pinkish red when they come in contact with a liquid.



These sensors are primarily employed by Apple to make it easier for its Apple Store Geniuses and third-party repair technicians to determine whether a device has failed as a result of liquid damage, which isn't covered under the company's standard warranty.



Over the years, however, Apple has been on the receiving end of much criticism, and at least one lawsuit, over the sensors, which have a tendency to indicate false positives, especially in regions with humid climates and at other times when the devices haven't actually been met with direct contact from a liquid source.



Sometime last year it was rumored that Apple was altering its internal policy on the iPhone's LSIs, and was said to have informed some providers that more than one of the handset's sensors had to have been triggered before the device was denied repair under warranty.







Now, a new repair document uncovered by MacGeneration suggests that iPods with a triggered LSI that don't show any external signs of damage or corrosion may still have its repairs honored under Apple's standard warranty if the owner disputes that they caused the damage.



It should be noted that while the document in question does not rule out similar guidelines for iPads and iPhones, it was authored specifically to address LSIs within iPods and its therefore unclear whether the policy translates to Apple's other iOS devices.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Now, a new repair document uncovered by MacGeneration suggests that iPods with a triggered LSI that don't show any external signs of damage or corrosion may still have its repairs honored under Apple's standard warranty if the owner disputes that they caused the damage.



    Better believe they'll be disputing it now.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,283member
    Apple has actually been doing this for a long time. They have repaired my phone under warranty, even with water damage. It is always a case by case situation. People just like a sensational story about how Apple refused repairs.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    For whatever it's worth, I recently had an iPhone replaced because the dock connector was corroded. Only the bottom liquid sensor "tripped". The Genius said that since only one was triggered, the damage was likely due to normal use (raindrops when using outside, etc.) and not submersion. That seems to be the real issue. He also replaced it even though the warranty has just run out. He said, "Soooo... this started happening BEFORE the warranty expired, RIGHT?" "Sure did!"
  • Reply 4 of 13
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jchausse View Post


    For whatever it's worth, I recently had an iPhone replaced because the dock connector was corroded. Only the bottom liquid sensor "tripped". The Genius said that since only one was triggered, the damage was likely due to normal use (raindrops when using outside, etc.) and not submersion. That seems to be the real issue. He also replaced it even though the warranty has just run out. He said, "Soooo... this started happening BEFORE the warranty expired, RIGHT?" "Sure did!"



    same with my wife, she just had an iphone 4 replaced with only one sensor tripped. the genius opened up the phone to verify that there wasn't water damage inside the phone
  • Reply 5 of 13
    Somehow, somewhere, this will lead to abuse.
  • Reply 6 of 13
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    Somehow, somewhere, this will lead to abuse.



    Yea, and since high humidity can trigger these sensors, more than a few people have probably had legitimate repair of their devices refused and suffered financially as a result. That is abuse of a different kind.
  • Reply 7 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post


    Apple has actually been doing this for a long time. They have repaired my phone under warranty, even with water damage. It is always a case by case situation. People just like a sensational story about how Apple refused repairs.



    People also like a policy that is fair, well-defined and equitably applied.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    ezduzitezduzit Posts: 158member
    it'll be interesting to find out how android owners get satifaction for their problems, and they will have problems.
  • Reply 9 of 13
    That makes sense. It is only in certain situation that applies but is good Apple relaxed the policy.

  • Reply 10 of 13
    Strange that of all the technological miracles that go into a an iphone, waterproof-ness never seems to make the cut. It's already a sealed unit. In the words of Top Gear -- "How hard could it be?"
  • Reply 11 of 13
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    Interesting - Someone apparently got a free replacement when an iPhone was dropped in the ocean: http://www.ankleskater.com/pagemaker...20110102153500.



    Yet someone else couldn't get a replacement when the glass cracked in cold weather: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Extre...r-178288.shtml



    Who to believe?
  • Reply 12 of 13
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post


    Yea, and since high humidity can trigger these sensors, more than a few people have probably had legitimate repair of their devices refused and suffered financially as a result. That is abuse of a different kind.



    I guess the other companies that also use these sensors never have any issues with them.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post


    I guess the other companies that also use these sensors never have any issues with them.



    Of course they do but their repair policy has likely not been as strict, hence no problem.



    There can always be abuse in a system that gives people the benefit of the doubt, but that does not mean such a system should not be used. The alternative is much worse for those people who have legitimate claims.
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